LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 05-29-2017, 10:49 AM   #1
lighter973
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2016
Posts: 34

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Distro for regular non-computer type people?


Hello,

Im thinking of Ubuntu or Mint.

What is the difference between Ubuntu and Mint?

Last edited by lighter973; 05-29-2017 at 10:50 AM.
 
Old 05-29-2017, 11:24 AM   #2
DavidMcCann
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: London
Distribution: PCLinuxOS, Debian
Posts: 5,793

Rep: Reputation: 2153Reputation: 2153Reputation: 2153Reputation: 2153Reputation: 2153Reputation: 2153Reputation: 2153Reputation: 2153Reputation: 2153Reputation: 2153Reputation: 2153
Every 2 years, Mint takes the long-term support version of Ubuntu after any obvious bugs have been reported and removed, makes some alterations, and turns it into Mint. Then for the next two years, they update it themselves, a bit more cautiously than Ubuntu. The result is that Mint is slightly more reliable: I can remember the Ubuntu with the crashing installer and the one with broken usb sound support, both of which Mint headed off at the pass.

The other difference is the GUI. The default for Ubuntu is Unity, which will be replaced by Gnome. The joint defaults for Mint are Cinnamon and Mate. Unity makes your computer look like a phone, Gnome makes it look like a tablet (and is actually the best bet if you actually have a tablet) Mate (plainer) and Cinnamon (fancier) are more traditional. You can obviously use almost any GUI with almost any distro, but the defaults are the ones that most people use and so are often better maintained.

People tend to love or loath Ubuntu, but most people who pick Mint seem contented enough.
 
3 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-29-2017, 03:36 PM   #3
jefro
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Posts: 21,008

Rep: Reputation: 3408Reputation: 3408Reputation: 3408Reputation: 3408Reputation: 3408Reputation: 3408Reputation: 3408Reputation: 3408Reputation: 3408Reputation: 3408Reputation: 3408
You really need to try different stuff. It may be that some distro works for you. It may be that windows or Mac works. Only you can tell what appeals to your needs.

The mission and target audience for distro's are almost always posted on the distro's web pages. Sometimes information can be recovered from distrowatch.com and web searches.

If you are only interested in Mint or Ubuntu then I'd call them a draw to some extent. Mint may have more mediacentric abilities by default. Ubuntu may have more documentation.

Knowing the hardware may play a part in this.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-29-2017, 03:50 PM   #4
hydrurga
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2008
Location: Pictland
Distribution: Linux Mint 20 MATE
Posts: 8,048
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918
If you're only looking at Ubuntu and Mint then I would suggest that the desktop environment that you choose is of more importance.

My preference is for the "classic desktop metaphor" (think Windows XP/7) and so I've chosen the MATE desktop flavour of Mint 18.1 (MATE is also available in Ubuntu).

Also similar, and available as flavours in either/both Ubuntu and Mint, are Cinnamon (Mint), Xfce (both), and LXDE (Ubuntu).

Don't spend too much time choosing. Dive in and boot from a few live distros and see which one you feel more comfortable with, then install that one.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-29-2017, 04:20 PM   #5
sundialsvcs
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 9,240
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 3265Reputation: 3265Reputation: 3265Reputation: 3265Reputation: 3265Reputation: 3265Reputation: 3265Reputation: 3265Reputation: 3265Reputation: 3265Reputation: 3265
There's a marvelous Unix distribution called Macintosh OS/X ...
 
Old 05-29-2017, 05:33 PM   #6
syg00
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Australia
Distribution: Lots ...
Posts: 19,794

Rep: Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575
Brought to you by the people who stole the concepts of mouse and windows as computer interfaces from the folks at PARC and then tried to sue the rest of the world for using similar.
Pricks.

Personally I steer new Linux people towards Mint.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-29-2017, 06:26 PM   #7
!!!
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2017
Location: Fremont, CA, USA
Distribution: Trying any&ALL on old/minimal
Posts: 759

Rep: Reputation: 330Reputation: 330Reputation: 330Reputation: 330
People seem to pay (loose approximation) TEN times as much (1,000 percent more)
for an iPhone vs. Android, iPad vs. cheap tablet, Mac/MacBook vs. economy PC/laptop,
with the same *basic* functionality. ("regular, non-computer type people", I guess.)
Something must be "insanely" great about Apple'$ User Interface/User eXperience
(Not for me tho; my insanity is: cheapest minimal basics.)

So, what's the feasibility/recommendation of a Linux distro which duplicates
the UI/UX of iPhone/iPad/Mac (..ick)yApple.com$$$ most closely?

Last edited by !!!; 05-29-2017 at 06:47 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-29-2017, 07:07 PM   #8
AwesomeMachine
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: USA and Italy
Distribution: Debian testing/sid; OpenSuSE; Fedora; Mint
Posts: 5,513

Rep: Reputation: 1010Reputation: 1010Reputation: 1010Reputation: 1010Reputation: 1010Reputation: 1010Reputation: 1010Reputation: 1010
One of the best distros for having the hardware all working out of the box, and having a bootable system regardless of the hardware, is opensuse. The downside is less available software (less than Debian), and older packages.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-29-2017, 07:59 PM   #9
syg00
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Australia
Distribution: Lots ...
Posts: 19,794

Rep: Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575
Hmm ... haven't looked at them in years. I have a similar requirement for a new user. Maybe time to have a look again. Tx.
 
Old 05-29-2017, 09:23 PM   #10
frankbell
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Ubuntu MATE, Mageia, and whatever VMs I happen to be playing with
Posts: 17,526
Blog Entries: 28

Rep: Reputation: 5452Reputation: 5452Reputation: 5452Reputation: 5452Reputation: 5452Reputation: 5452Reputation: 5452Reputation: 5452Reputation: 5452Reputation: 5452Reputation: 5452
Many distros offer "Live" versions. They can be installed to a CD/DVD or USB stick and booted directly from that media without being installed to bare metal.

I would suggest trying some of those and then deciding which one you find most comfortable.

I generally recommend Mint MATE (Cinnamon's okay, I just prefer MATE), Magiea, or OpenSUSE, though I myself started using Linux with Slackware.
 
Old 05-29-2017, 09:52 PM   #11
Shadow_7
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Distribution: debian
Posts: 4,137
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 873Reputation: 873Reputation: 873Reputation: 873Reputation: 873Reputation: 873Reputation: 873
Elementary OS
Solus

And others that target "new" users. I'm not really a fan of ubuntu, but if it's someone else's computer and I don't want my phone to ring, I tend to install that one for others.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-30-2017, 04:52 AM   #12
mrmazda
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2016
Location: USA
Distribution: openSUSE, Debian, Knoppix, Mageia, Fedora, others
Posts: 3,358
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132
Quote:
Originally Posted by AwesomeMachine View Post
One of the best distros for having the hardware all working out of the box, and having a bootable system regardless of the hardware, is opensuse. The downside is less available software (less than Debian), and older packages.
Less software: Curious assertion. Got anything to back it up?

Older packages?:
Latest stable Debian release: 25 month old Jessie/8 with standard repos: kernel 3.16.7, Xorg 1.16.4, Plasma 4.11.13, Thunderbird 31.6.0, libreoffice 4.3.3, Gimp 2.8.14, QT 4.8.6
Latest stable openSUSE release: 6 month old 42.2 with standard repos: kernel 4.4.47, Xorg 1.18.3, Plasma 4.8.2, Thunderbird 45.4.0, libreoffice 5.1.5, Gimp 2.8.18. QT 5.6.1
openSUSE also has rolling release Tumbleweed with standard repos: kernel 4.11.2, Xorg 1.19.1, Plasma 5.9.2, Thunderbird 45.7.1, libreoffice 5.3.0.3, Gimp 2.8.20, QT 5.7.1

openSUSE not only has its Build Service able to build almost any software anyone wants, but will do it for distros other than openSUSE, e.g. Fedora, Debian, Ubuntu, SUSE Linux Enterprise and other distributions.
 
Old 05-30-2017, 04:57 AM   #13
syg00
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Australia
Distribution: Lots ...
Posts: 19,794

Rep: Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575
I just downloaded the 14.2 DVD - I might be less than inclined to suggest such a complex arrangement as snapper to a person new to Linux. I'll do a build tomorrow and see if I'm mistaken.
 
Old 05-31-2017, 02:48 AM   #14
syg00
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Australia
Distribution: Lots ...
Posts: 19,794

Rep: Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575Reputation: 3575
Well openSUSE is (still) an unmitigated disaster IM(NS)HO. There is zero chance of me recommending that to a new user.
Screen constantly flashing with the radeon driver - but every other distro has no issue.
No locale for AU got installed, and nor is one available - and yast crashes without message on any update. journalctl shows a pam error for root session being already active. But it isn't.
Yast was probably the reason I abandoned {open}SUSE years ago. SUSE insist on not providing decent stand alone CLI tools. (lspci/hwinfo/whatever for example before you ask).

What is a new user going to think - especially if some tells them to post their fstab ...
Mint it is if anyone happens to ask me.
 
Old 05-31-2017, 03:21 AM   #15
mrmazda
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2016
Location: USA
Distribution: openSUSE, Debian, Knoppix, Mageia, Fedora, others
Posts: 3,358
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132Reputation: 1132
Quote:
Originally Posted by syg00 View Post
Well openSUSE is (still) an unmitigated disaster IM(NS)HO. There is zero chance of me recommending that to a new user.
Screen constantly flashing with the radeon driver - but every other distro has no issue.
No locale for AU got installed, and nor is one available - and yast crashes without message on any update. journalctl shows a pam error for root session being already active. But it isn't.
Yast was probably the reason I abandoned {open}SUSE years ago. SUSE insist on not providing decent stand alone CLI tools. (lspci/hwinfo/whatever for example before you ask).

What is a new user going to think - especially if some tells them to post their fstab ...
Mint it is if anyone happens to ask me.
openSUSE is the only distro I've ever run 24/7, up for past 47 days since last kernel update, in use to type this. I have more openSUSE installations than I can keep track of, more than all other distros (Fedora, Debian, Mageia, Kubuntu, AntiX, Mint, Gentoo and others) combined, probably at least 90, all in multi- multiboot. Several machines have ATI video of various vintages, including the one I'm in the middle of updating Tumbleweed on, and no openSUSEes have any trouble with Xorg. They have always included lspci. I can't remember ever needing to explicitly ask for hwinfo to be installed. Best cmdline package manager anywhere is SUSE's zypper.

openSUSE's installer provides far and away the most overall flexibility of those I've ever used, doesn't use mousetype as some do, yet for a first time user is plenty simple and straighforward.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Installing Ubuntu: On Which Computer & Which Download (Computer Type) Ntvu Linux - Newbie 2 06-09-2008 04:05 PM
Distro + WM for Kiosk-type box for old people Jimmy The Clown Linux - Distributions 1 11-02-2005 08:56 PM
Can my linux computer be a router AND a regular computer? DJOtaku Linux - Wireless Networking 4 06-09-2005 07:22 AM
You people can't even type... opioid Linux - Software 3 06-08-2004 06:35 AM
regular imcp echo requests (type 8's)? yocompia Linux - Security 12 09-14-2003 07:36 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:09 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration