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Old 04-22-2011, 12:36 AM   #1
HeavenElite
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Question Difference of The base distributions


Question 1:
There is a picture discribed the relationship of all the linux distribution. Click Here

I can't understand why lots of distributions finally become one distribution??

It looks like that Slackware,Redhat and Debian have no relationship.
So what're the differences of them???
And what advantages do each of them have ??

Questions 2: (Maybe the same question an the frist one)
There is a list of the purposes of all the linux distributions.
Click Here

I find that some distributions are on the same purposer and some disrtibutions are on the same base distribution.
So are the base distributions are that ones which have no relationship as I said in questions 1?

Question 3:
I was told that "if you want to learn linux as deeper as you can,
you must learn the internel works and install the Slackware." by Anisha Kaul.

Slackware is sure the base distribution,but there are other ones such as Redhat Debian.
Why Slackware is better to use to learn the internel linuxOS???
So what do the other base ditributions are better to use to do??

Last edited by HeavenElite; 04-22-2011 at 12:41 AM.
 
Old 04-22-2011, 12:57 AM   #2
stickman
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In short, each distribution maintainer has different goals or philosophies on architecture, management, appearance, etc. The good thing about Linux is that anyone has the opportunity to create their own distribution to fit their needs. If it's worthwhile or interesting to others, then it will surge in popularity.
 
Old 04-22-2011, 01:03 AM   #3
Breeze
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The same question have been asked before.Google will be tell you what's the difference between distributions.
If you use these distributions,you will know about the difference by yourself.
 
Old 04-22-2011, 01:23 AM   #4
HeavenElite
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Breeze View Post
The same question have been asked before.Google will be tell you what's the difference between distributions.
If you use these distributions,you will know about the difference by yourself.
Yes,I asked before.But Why Slackware is better to use to learn the internel linuxOS???
 
Old 04-22-2011, 01:44 AM   #5
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenElite View Post
Yes,I asked before.But Why Slackware is better to use to learn the internel linuxOS???
Thats just Anisha Kauls opinion. (though lots of other people would share it).

Slackware makes you do things that other linux distros dont, its less automated than a lot of distros. So by installing slackware, you have to learn more about how the system works. But its not necessarily the best choice to "learn the linux internals", and its far from the only choice.
 
Old 04-22-2011, 02:14 AM   #6
TheIndependentAquarius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenElite View Post
But Why Slackware is better to use to learn the internel linuxOS???
If I compare Slackware with Ubuntu, I can say that the Ubuntu's package manager holds your hand, doesn't allow you get lost, on one click you'll get the things done/installed [by the package manager]

In case of Slackware,
1. You have to add a user by command line.
2. You have to yourself start the XServer, you'll know what is a XServer and how to start it..
3. You are not forced to install each and every damn thing on the installation DVD, you can choose to check/uncheck each and every single file during installation (which will in turn force you to understand what that file is meant for).
4. You can also create a tag file and then install from it and also learn how to create a tag file.
5. It asks you to partition your harddisk yourself either through cfdisk or fdisk.
6. While installing a new software, it doesn't resolve the dependencies itself, it assumes you are smart enough to do it yourself, though it does tell you what the dependencies are.
7. It doesn't hold your hand, even if you break your system.

again, if you have ample amount of time on your hands, I'll again recommend "Linux from scratch". In that case you'll be building a Linux distribution yourself.

Last edited by TheIndependentAquarius; 04-22-2011 at 02:15 AM.
 
Old 04-22-2011, 02:20 AM   #7
TheIndependentAquarius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenElite View Post
Question 3:
I was told that "if you want to learn linux as deeper as you can,
you must learn the internel works and install the Slackware." by Anisha Kaul.
I didn't say that Slackware is the only way you can lean Linux internally, I pointed out two other ways too (which you haven't mentioned here): http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...5/#post4327628
 
Old 04-22-2011, 03:14 AM   #8
Breeze
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What do want to get from Linux?
 
Old 04-22-2011, 03:47 AM   #9
cascade9
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@ Anisha Kaul- rereading what I posted, ("Thats just Anisha Kauls opinion.") I realise that it could have sound harsh. It wasnt meant that way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
If I compare Slackware with Ubuntu, I can say that the Ubuntu's package manager holds your hand, doesn't allow you get lost, on one click you'll get the things done/installed [by the package manager]
You've got a point about ubuntu (and slackware as well for that matter). I'm no fan of ubuntu, for various reasons, but I've got to point this out- what you are saying is only true if you do a full install.

If you do a minimal install of ubuntu, then add whatever you need on top of the base install you will learn a lot more than just doing a full install. If you dont add synaptic/software center than you will get the hang of using the command line to install packages as well.

I wouldnt bother myself, I'd rather do the same thing with debian over ubuntu, but like I said, I dont like ubuntu...

IMO it would be easier for most people to start of like that, then move onto distros like slackware once you have a better idea of what you want.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Breeze View Post
What do want to get from Linux?
And so, my fellow *nix users: ask not what linux can do for you - ask what you can do for linux.
 
Old 04-22-2011, 03:54 AM   #10
HeavenElite
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Breeze View Post
What do want to get from Linux?
MS Windows has separated me from the kerenel and hardware,I recognised that MS Windows just a software market.

So I think linux can let me know what's the computer and network and how do them work.
 
Old 04-22-2011, 03:59 AM   #11
HeavenElite
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by stickman View Post
In short, each distribution maintainer has different goals or philosophies on architecture, management, appearance, etc. The good thing about Linux is that anyone has the opportunity to create their own distribution to fit their needs. If it's worthwhile or interesting to others, then it will surge in popularity.
Oh!!The Linux world is discribed so beautiful,as if I can been the king of my computer!!

I will remember your words forever!!
 
Old 04-22-2011, 04:06 AM   #12
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenElite View Post
Oh!!The Linux world is discribed so beautiful,as if I can been the king of my computer!!

I will remember your words forever!!
And that is exactly the point. You can be the king of your computer. In fact, I see no point in being not the king of my machines.
 
Old 04-22-2011, 04:25 AM   #13
k3lt01
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This is a question that you can ask till the cows come home you will get a different answer from most people who answer. It basically comes down to personal choice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade9 View Post
And so, my fellow *nix users: ask not what linux can do for you - ask what you can do for linux.
Lol.

I answered a similar question a few minutes ago on UF. Sorry to all the purists out there I do still, sometimes, visit UF.

If you want to learn the inner workings of Linux you can without having to resort to Slackware or LFS. You do however need to get a good grip on CLI. If you cannot handle CLI you probably wont be able to get into the inner workings.

As for the difference between the base distros it has already been mentioned they each have different purposes, goals and philosophies.

Debian strives for stability and freedom and that's why I prefer it to the others. DPKG is a rock solid way to install packages. Cascade is correct when he says you will learn alot by doing a mini install of Debian (and its variants of which Ubuntu is one). When you go further you can mix dists (stable, testing, unstable, experimental) and build a system to your taste. I have a system in my study, it is now my server with a GUI, and it uses all 4 dists picking packages from different dists and apt-pinning them to get the system I want. If you do this YOU are required to know what dependencies are required so you will learn quickly. Another way of getting into the inner workings of Debian systems would be to check out DebianLive and learn to build your own using the options in the scripts supplied.

RedHat, for the life of me I can't like it, used to give options you could choose if you wanted Office applications and what one, likewise you could choose if you wanted Entertainment packages and what ones. I think, although I'm not sure, RedHat and Fedora don't give that level of choice anymore. RPM used to be a shocker for installation of applications although they have done alot of work on it and fixed up the "RPM Hell" that people used to go through.

Last edited by k3lt01; 04-22-2011 at 04:27 AM.
 
Old 04-22-2011, 04:40 AM   #14
HeavenElite
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
if you have ample amount of time on your hands, I'll again recommend "Linux from scratch". In that case you'll be building a Linux distribution yourself.
Yes, Sir or Mz ,Anisha Kaul.Since I began to input my first linux command ,I have keep using the terminal which instead by the command "init 3" later.I have no interests on beautiful image or video,I just like code,since I touch the keyboard of my first desktop computer.However, I have to work with the windows XP even now.....

I have time now, because I have one year and a half time before I leave the University.
Could I build my onw linux distribution ?
That sound delicious!!
But I just a newbie who can't see how the linux kernel works.I've compile a kernel,but just a few of the opitons I can understand.The options lists some modules which used as hardware drivers.But I know nothing about lots of hardware.

I just learned the C Language(I got the degree certificate of C Language with 85 in written examination in China)and Assembler Language when I learn the school course---<Principle of Microcomputer>.
I also have a six-year experinences of using computer (4 years with desktop,2 years with notebook)and I have done some student experiment in the cource of MicroControlUnit used the product of Microchip.
Is it enouth to learn to build my onw linux distribution ?

Could I build my onw linux distribution ? Please tell me~~

Last edited by HeavenElite; 04-22-2011 at 04:41 AM.
 
Old 04-22-2011, 05:00 AM   #15
TheIndependentAquarius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenElite View Post
Yes, Sir or Mz ,Anisha Kaul.
Does Anisha sound like a male's name?

Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenElite View Post
But I just a newbie who can't see how the linux kernel works.I've compile a kernel,but just a few of the opitons I can understand.The options lists some modules which used as hardware drivers.But I know nothing about lots of hardware.
Compiling the kernel by reading some instructions is one thing and "understanding" what and why you are doing, is another. The second task is not easy and won't be easy until and unless you can explain to yourself that why do YOU need to re-compile the kernel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenElite View Post
Is it enouth to learn to build my onw linux distribution ?
No its not enough to know how to build a distribution, in order to understand the kernel completely. But you need to start somewhere. And starting off from a point where you have ample amount of documentation on your hands which doesn't require you to mug up things, which doesn't bore you by telling you only the theory, which makes you to get your hands dirty, a little, is IMO a good point to start.

At the same time (if you have enough interest in knowing how kernel deals with the processes/threads/files etc.) you can refer to the books I have mentioned in that Sticky thread. And then there are interesting tasks like creating your own system calls, creating your own shell, writing interrupt handlers, writing device drivers, etc. and last but not the least: developing your own operating system: http://wiki.osdev.org/Main_Page

I think, LFS will give you a confidence and you'll be able to see a source of light. LQ even has a special forum for it: http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...om-scratch-13/

Last edited by TheIndependentAquarius; 04-22-2011 at 05:02 AM.
 
  


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