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Old 04-13-2007, 09:01 AM   #1
shipon_97
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Question Difference between /root and /


Dear Friends ,

I have the following Two questions :

1) In Linux concept , What is the difference between '/root' and '/' .

2) My 2nd question is network related . Can any one plz tell me , is it possible to share a single IP (Like : 192.168.1.1) within two or more pc . i.e., I want to know if I have a single IP and I want to use this IP aganst the three 'hostname', then is it possible to do ?
 
Old 04-13-2007, 09:11 AM   #2
pixellany
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The word "root" has a minimum of four meanings:
  1. The name of the super-user
  2. The name of the super-user's home directory (/root)
  3. The top node of the filesystem (/)
  4. The place that GRUB is told to look for the kernel (in the GRUB "root (hdX,Y)" command)

On the second question, I would say no. If I send a packet to 192.168.1.1, how would I know which pc it went to??
 
Old 04-13-2007, 10:34 AM   #3
forrestt
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Just to add my 2 cents: "/" is the root directory. It is the highest level directory of the first partition to be mounted when the system boots. If there is a problem with the system, and it can't boot all the way, the "root" user needs to be able to log in and fix things. Therefore, it is convenient to have the root user's home directory on the same (root) partition. Many years ago, / was where the root user's home directory was. However, this caused a lot of files that didn't need to be in the / directory to be there (and some that other users shouldn't see). So, to resolve that problem, a /root directory was made, and that was assigned to be the root user's home directory. That way, the root user could have all the tools and settings in the root partition but not visible to other users.

As far as the filesystem goes, when you hear the root directory the person is referring to "/" and when you hear "slash root" they are referring to /root (or at least they should be).

As far as pixellany's #4, that isn't limited to GRUB, that is the concept of the "root partition" which is the first partition to be mounted at boot time, and therefore has to be where the kernel lives.
 
Old 04-13-2007, 11:03 AM   #4
dickgregory
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany
The word "root" has a minimum of four meanings:
  1. The name of the super-user
  2. The name of the super-user's home directory (/root)
  3. The top node of the filesystem (/)
  4. The place that GRUB is told to look for the kernel (in the GRUB "root (hdX,Y)" command)
Number 5 use for "root"

The root group. Files can be assigned to the root group so that other users who are also assigned to the root group can access them even though they are owned by root. There's lots of reading material on this subject.
 
Old 04-13-2007, 05:29 PM   #5
AdaHacker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shipon_97
2) My 2nd question is network related . Can any one plz tell me , is it possible to share a single IP (Like : 192.168.1.1) within two or more pc . i.e., I want to know if I have a single IP and I want to use this IP aganst the three 'hostname', then is it possible to do ?
Depends on what you mean.

It's certainly possible to have 1 external IP for multiple systems - connect them to a router that does NAT. Each system will have its own internal IP, but systems outside that private network will see them all at the same IP.

Now if you want to have three systems on your internal network all use the same IP without setting up a sub-network, I don't think you can do that. But then again, if it's on your private network, I can't think of any reason why you'd need to. It seems kind of pointless.
 
  


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