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Old 05-31-2004, 06:22 PM   #1
bitpicker
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Registered: Jul 2003
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Description of standard groups


When adding a new user in SuSE Linux, I get the choice of adding the new user to an extensive list of groups. As I didn't create them they seem to follow some set of standards - I know for instance that 'wheel' is a group of users allowed to sudo. But I am completely ignorant of what most of the other groups do. Is there any comprehensive list of typical user groups available on the internet? Googling didn't get me very far (probably I'm not using the best search terms), and my books are strangely silent on the matter...

Robin
 
Old 05-31-2004, 09:23 PM   #2
adamwenner
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in standard linux, every user created is also added to a group of the same name, specified in the /etc/group file

not sure if this is what you are talking about
 
Old 06-01-2004, 04:03 AM   #3
bitpicker
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What I meant is that SuSE gives me a list of maybe 20 groups I can add the user I am creating to, such as 'users' (obviously), but also cdrom, wheel, postfix, dialout and lots of others; what I am looking for is a kind of glossary telling me what a given group can do so that I can assess which groups the user should be in and which he shouldn't. Some of the names give me a vague idea, but some are completely arcane to me.

Robin
 
Old 06-01-2004, 08:45 AM   #4
adamwenner
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this may be able to help you

http://openskills.info/view/boxdetai...boxtype=distro

http://www.groupsrv.com/linux/viewtopic.php?p=39805

http://www.eservercomputing.com/iser...dex.asp?id=736

hope this helps, btw, these groups are called "system groups"
 
  


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