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Old 06-29-2005, 11:28 AM   #1
Fredstar
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Debian partition scheme


Debian partition scheme
--

Hello im new to debian but decided to give it a try. I just wanted to know with a pIII 1.something ghz, 256 ram, 60 GB 7200 Hard drive what is a good setup for the hard drive.

thanks
 
Old 06-29-2005, 11:32 AM   #2
trickykid
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Depends on what you want to use it for..

I always and even on desktops make a minimum of these partitions:

/
/boot
/usr
/home
/var
/tmp

That way it is easier to recover portions of your system, if /var logs get out of hand they don't fill up your hard drive and only fill up their partition.. and /tmp should always be on its own for security reasons and for the same reasons /var is on its own.. etc.
 
Old 06-29-2005, 12:18 PM   #3
Fredstar
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To specifie in more detail would it be best to set up the following..

/
/boot
/swap
/etc
/home
/usr
/sbin
/sys
/tmp
/var

My question is what size should i assign the following.

How large should boot, swap, etc, home, usr, sbin, sys, tmp, var be given its a 60gb hard drive. (for general setup)

thanks
 
Old 06-30-2005, 07:35 AM   #4
jonaskoelker
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The canonical guide would be http://www.pathname.com/fhs/

But the problem is that it's not newbie-friendly.

Plus: although the idea of splitting up /usr, /var, /boot and so forth is good, you need to know what you're doing, and you need to predict what you're gonna use each partition for. I couldn't predict that /var would be both apt-cache, www-files and DBs, and I find it too small. I also mispredicted usage of space on /usr (alloc 14g, use 3g).

My best suggestion for newbies is this:
Code:
/boot -- small; 100m should be enough
/swap -- small too
# if you don't plan on playing memory-hungry games, I'd say 256 is more than enough.
# If you want to be on the (too ultra-)safe side, go for 512.
# If it's more a workstation than a play(/entertainment-)station (i.e. abiword and gnumeric, no heavy media (video and games)), 128 could easily be fine.
# General advice: 256
/home -- most; I'd say 40g or more in your case
/ -- the rest; 20g or less (but not a lot less)--15 may be okay too, 10 a bit on the low side; 5 is prob. too little.
The reason I recommend this is that it's really annoying to have a full /var (so I have to shoot the apt-cache every now and then) and an almost-empty /usr (from where /var could safely be given 75% of the space). If one directory *does* `flood' your disk, you'll always have du(1) to find out what to clean up.

hth --Jonas

Last edited by jonaskoelker; 06-30-2005 at 07:37 AM.
 
Old 06-30-2005, 10:22 AM   #5
trickykid
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Quote:
Originally posted by Fredstar
To specifie in more detail would it be best to set up the following..

/
/boot
/swap
/etc
/home
/usr
/sbin
/sys
/tmp
/var

My question is what size should i assign the following.

How large should boot, swap, etc, home, usr, sbin, sys, tmp, var be given its a 60gb hard drive. (for general setup)

thanks
No need to make separate partitions for etc, sbin or sys unless you want a gazillion small partitions..

With a 60GB drive I'd do the following if I was setting it up:

swap = 512MB
/boot = 20MB make bigger if you plan to have a ton of compiled kernels to choose from.
/ = 1024MB or 1GB
/usr = 4096MB or larger, if you plan to install a lot of software that isn't already installed. 10GB would probably last a while unless your the type who likes to install and keep a bunch of everything.
/tmp = 1024MB or 1GB
/var = 1024MB or 1GB
/home = Rest of your space for user files unless you like having a /data partition in which I like having on my systems. Then I make my /home partition smaller and make a /data partition fairly larger to organize my files.
 
Old 06-30-2005, 02:47 PM   #6
Lleb_KCir
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personally i make it even simpler:

/boot
/
/swap
/home

keeps life simple, but does not give you the freedom of having more paritions if you need to start over and replace things or change distro etc...

for me i am happy with this as i do not lose my /home directory as that is were i keep 90% of my data, thus /home for personal *girns*
 
Old 07-09-2005, 09:42 PM   #7
jonaskoelker
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Quote:
personally i make it even simpler:

/boot
/
/swap
/home
*scrolls back two posts* hmm... that looks like a good idea
 
  


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