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Old 07-08-2003, 04:47 PM   #1
utterconfusion
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Tennessee
Distribution: tenatively mandrake 9.0
Posts: 6

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Unhappy completely lost mandrake 9.0




ok i just got mandrake 9.0 haven't even installed it yet, i have never dual-booted or used linux before and need to know what i'm in for so here is what i'd like to do:

i currently run :
1.3 Ghz
384 MB sdRAM
1, 30 gig HD NTFS
1, 40 gig dynamic HD split into 2, 20 gig partitions: 1 is NTFS the other is FAT32
onboard video and sound
1, 52x CD-rom
1, 40x12x40 CDRW
win2k pro

I would like to install mandrake to the FAT32 drive without screwing up anything else and would appreciate any instructions or advice

thank you,
utterconfusion


 
Old 07-08-2003, 05:04 PM   #2
fancypiper
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Registered: Feb 2003
Location: Sparta, NC USA
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.04
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Note that without a fat32 partition to write to, you won't be able to write files from Linux that Windows can see.

In the install, choose to delete (if you want all the space)/resize (if you want to be able to have some left) the fat32 partition to make room for Linux and install from there.

Proper Linux Filesystem Layout

# Mandrake links
Mandrake home page
Mandrake Users website
Easy urpmi config for Mandrake
urpmi mini-HOWTO
Easy software management: Red Carpet
Maximum RPM
rpmfind
You didn't install the developmental packages? As root, command:
urpmi gcc
An Introduction to the Midnight Commander. You can install it by commanding:
urpmi mc
Midnight Commander home page
 
Old 07-08-2003, 06:05 PM   #3
utterconfusion
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Tennessee
Distribution: tenatively mandrake 9.0
Posts: 6

Original Poster
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uuuuum ok , i do have a fat32 partition, what i want to know is how to install mandrake 9.0 to it without screwing up win2kpro (i need win2kpro for work and school but want to learn linux) and i need the cpu to give me a choice of win2kpro or linux on boot up, sorry if my original question was confusing, or if iam misunderstanding the answer
 
Old 07-08-2003, 06:34 PM   #4
fancypiper
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Registered: Feb 2003
Location: Sparta, NC USA
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.04
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I'm sorry, but I have no Windows 2000 experience, but I have seen these mentioned, so become familiar with the Windows 2000 bootloader see Microsoft's Computer Management and familarize yourself with the Windows 2000 Recovery Console.

Some references for you about Linux
GNU/Linux pre-installation checklist
Installation Help Files

Mandrake uses LILO as the bootloader by default
LILO mini HOWTO
Multiboot with LILO HOWTO
LILO, Linux Crash Rescue HOW-TO
Installing a bootloader

Mandrake Docs:
Quick Startup Guide
Chapter 3. Installation with DrakX
Starter Guide
Chapter 1. Installation with DrakX

Last edited by fancypiper; 07-08-2003 at 06:46 PM.
 
Old 07-09-2003, 09:08 AM   #5
matchpoint04
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2003
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dual boot

What you are eesentially trying to do is a dual boot. I was exactly in your shoes about two weeks ago with XP and wanting linux and I got through it fine. Basically all you need to do is install linux (I use mandrake but red hat is good too i've heard). If you install linux it should automatically set up the dual boot for you or you put in a few little settings. The problem is with your setup i'm not sure you're ready for the penguin. Linux really should have its own partition and unless you're willing to part ways with your fat32 i think you are going to have to do some repartitioning.
Here are some really good articles that i found helpful:
http://www.techtv.com/screensavers/a...346823,00.html
http://www.techtv.com/screensavers/l...397093,00.html

Hope this helps and have fun!
Scott
 
Old 07-09-2003, 10:24 AM   #6
chakkerz
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Registered: Dec 2002
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Distribution: RedHat (RHEL, FC, CentOS), openSuSE, Mac OS X
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whatever you do, backup your data before you try anything. It's easy to reinstall windows, so long as you have your work on CD ROM to reload.

Mandrake won't hurt you when you install it to a FAT32, just read the instructions on the screen, you'll be fine.

oh, before i forget, backup your data.
 
Old 07-09-2003, 10:27 AM   #7
MasterC
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Registered: Mar 2002
Location: Salt Lake City, UT - USA
Distribution: Gentoo ; LFS ; Kubuntu
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Unless you are referring to something that has (AFAIK) long since been abolished? You used to be able to install Mandrake into a Fat32 partition. It would create a folder as the entire partition and install there, then to remove linux all you had to do was delete your folder that was created.
I don't think the idea worked all that great, it was mainly only good for 'points on the board' and for showing/displaying linux to friends. lnx4win I believe it was called (someone correct me if I'm wrong on that) and it was an image on your Mandrake disc. I think it was around 7.2 or 8.0 when they cut this option out. You could get an old image if this is what you want to do, but be aware it's highly restricted and is not considered a great idea.

HTH

Cool
 
Old 07-09-2003, 12:16 PM   #8
JaseP
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2002
Location: Eastern PA, USA
Distribution: K/Ubuntu 12.04/14.04, Scientific Linux 6.3/6.4, Android-x86, Pretty much all distros at one point...
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Installing Mandrake (or any Linux distro) to a FAT32 partition is a huge mistake. FAT32 does not support the kind of things that you typically need in a filesystem, particularly the root filesystem.


Linux is not like your typical Windoze operating system. From the ground up it is designed to be a multi-user enabled system. There is a super-user called "root" and there are individual user accounts. If you install to a FAT32 filesystem, you undercut one of the key elements of the protections that the OS has, namely the ability to set permissions based upon both users status and partition/directory. You also loose the advantages of a journalized filesystem. So strongly reconsider what you are planning to do.

My advice is that you allow Mandrake to re-partition that FAT32 partition with a couple of journalized filesystems (reiserFS or EXT3) [ for the /, /usr & /home partitions] and keep a small FAT32 partition in order to transfer data between the two OSes. Also you want to make sure that your user information, kept in the /home directory or partition is a seperate partition so that if you need to re-install Mandrake, you can do it without reformatting and destroying your user data in that partition(usually, you want to do this in expert mode install).

Also, you might want to consider installing Mandrake 9.1 instead of 9.0. 9.1 supports bettern NTFS filesystem support and can move NTFS partitions around with DiskDrake (which eventually you will get to know) much more cleanly.
 
Old 07-09-2003, 12:48 PM   #9
slakmagik
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Registered: Feb 2003
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My experience:

I bought a used computer with W2K on a single partition on a 20 gig HD. I've dual-booted a lot of older DOS/Win situations but never messed with an NT dual boot before and didn't feel like messing with the NTFS filesystem, so bought a second used hard drive. I wasn't paying attention and grabbed a free connector and plugged it in. Weird stuff happened. Then I realized the single hard drive had been plugged into the middle of the cable, so I had connected the slave to the end. I switched the connections around and it went fine. But in playing with this, I disabled PnP in the BIOS which was probably a good thing as well. Anyway - both drives present, the second with crap on it.

So I put the Slack disk in and it gives me a prompt where I can run fdisk or cfdisk. I'm more familiar with fdisk, so I use that. I slice out a root and home partition and a swap and FAT transfer region that both OSes can use. Thus my four primaries. All I had to do was toggle the label from 82 to 83 and c on the last two, since it defaults to 82.

So then I return to the Slack install and choose Reiser for the first two partitions. When it comes to setting up LILO, I put it in the MBR of the primary master with a "Slack" label to default after five seconds and a "NT" label to choose the other OS. Continue on with the install.

Reboot and Slack is good. Reboot and NT thinks I have two unformatted partitions on "G:" and "H:" and asks me if I want to format them. Um, no, I don't, actually, but I'm guessing it thinks all three Linux partitions are "G:" and the FAT is "H:" and I format "H:" with the NT tool as FAT32. Reboot and everything's good on both systems. I set the FAT partition to be mounted under /doswin and Slack comes up by default, mounts it, and /dev/hdb is all Slack from it's point of view. While NT thinks the primary master is all for it and "G:" is also for it. Which is incorrect but it can think what it likes. I don't intend to use the NT much and I'm actually happy with them not really recognizing the existence of each other. The transfer partition will get files from one to the other if I need. If I run out of room, I'll reclaim the master drive but there's no reason to delete it at the moment, I don't guess.

So that's what I did. Your mileage may vary. Especially with that NTFS on the second drive and even more so if it has any part of the system on it. If possible and you don't need it, you might want to do away with it just for simplicity.

But anyway - I didn't mess with anything weird or the NT loader or trying to make a UMSDOS Slack or anything. I never ever let anything but LILO boot my systems and never had any problems that weren't easily fixed. It was actually pretty simple once the drive was recognized and, if yours already is, you're halfway there.

And guys - I think he's saying he wants to install Mandrake TO the FAT partition, but not AS a FAT partition. He just wants to use the space that's currently FAT. That can be changed in the partitioning and reformatting to Reiser or whatever.

And yeah - always back up your data.

- Holy $%#@. I just mounted /dev/hda1 on /mnt/hd for the hell of it and it turns out Slack has NTFS read-support (at least) built in, because I can see it all there. I didn't care, but it's still cool.
 
Old 07-09-2003, 04:01 PM   #10
utterconfusion
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Tennessee
Distribution: tenatively mandrake 9.0
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0


thanx you've all been helpful, i am more than willing to part with the fat32 in favor of linux, my question now is how to insert lilo into the MBR



thanx,
utterconfusion
 
Old 07-09-2003, 04:06 PM   #11
fancypiper
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Registered: Feb 2003
Location: Sparta, NC USA
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.04
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Mandrake's Installing a bootloader
 
Old 07-09-2003, 04:18 PM   #12
JaseP
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Registered: Jun 2002
Location: Eastern PA, USA
Distribution: K/Ubuntu 12.04/14.04, Scientific Linux 6.3/6.4, Android-x86, Pretty much all distros at one point...
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The Mandrake install utility will give you the option of setting up Lilo for you (I think it DOESN'T give you that as an option but does it automatically unless you use expert mode). Let the install routine set up Lilo with all the defaults...

Second, as to your FAT32 partition that you are giving over to Linux,...

Let's assume you are starting with a 10 GB partition. I would select 1-2 GB for for the / partition (assuming you have it contain /var as well), maybe 250 MB for /swap, sellect maybe 3-4 GB for the /usr partition, sellect about an equal amount for the /home partition (if you intend to do a lot of stuff such as run games in WineX, or edit large files), and any remainder for a /mnt/winswapper partition (maybe as large as 1 GB). Double the sizes here if you are going to give all 20 GB over to Linux...

You will be able to SEE everything on the NTFS partition, just not write to it safely. If you need to EXCHANGE data between Windoze and Linux, then you do it with the /mnt/winswapper partition...

Just a suggestion.

Last edited by JaseP; 07-09-2003 at 04:21 PM.
 
Old 07-09-2003, 04:57 PM   #13
utterconfusion
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Tennessee
Distribution: tenatively mandrake 9.0
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
ok thanks JaseP that was what i needed to know
everyone has been great i appreciate the help

thank you,
utterconfusion
 
  


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