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Old 06-08-2017, 03:24 PM   #1
Harnando
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Question Compiler Complications, (Trying to use 2 different ones in 2 different OS's Win 10|~Ubuntu/Mint)


So I'm working with a roommate in starting our venture to studying Programming, (In my case Java, and his python, I believe,) and I'm trying to fix up a laptop, that is having it's own complications, but that's on a different thread. As well as a Window's 10 Professional Desktop Computer I have for really keeping all my hard work backed up to, if not use better as a CAD device. (I mean as much as I can push it to, but yeah.) Now the problem/area we're trying to work on for this code is for Window's 10, and the laptop which currently is running Ubuntu, but I may install mint, if this WLAN's more readable on that, but more on that later.

I have a lot of compiler's downloaded, and to what my roommate says, he recommend using Emacs, however being that some of the files I'm trying to modify to test out my knowledge that I happen to load, (as embarrassing to say, I wanted to utilize my first experience in knowledge in java to mod MineCraft with the MineCraft's Coder Pack, (the 1.11.2 Directed Compatible one,) which, after observing the downloaded files, seemingly is more made for the Eclipse Compiler instead, and there is an plugin it appears for Eclipse to emulate Emacs, but as I am new to, well everything, I can't help but feel I'm overcomplicating something.

So I just want to know which is more recommended, Emacs, (As it is on Ubuntu, at least what my friend says, and am eventually going to use, as the laptop I'm fixing up I plan on putting whatever Linux OS that can actually read the internet through my current WLAN card) or Eclipse? (I did download the Java version, and then download the plugin, but as with MCP, contains little Executables to automatically "cling on to the mother program," if you will.

So yeah to be fair I am at the very beginning of understanding programming, and I want to share code between 3 devices, one of which is Window's 10, and the other 2 is Ubuntu related. So Yeah...
 
Old 06-08-2017, 04:14 PM   #2
wpeckham
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Just so you understand, your question has nothing to do with compilers. You issue is with code editors or an IDE (Integrated Development Environment).

Eclipse is supposed to be good for that. EMACS is not an IDE, but can be configured to act as one due to the power of the configuration options available.

I use different IDEs for different compilers (Lazaruth for Pascal, as an example) but do most of my coding in vim and compile on the command line (using make and often GCC/G++). Very old-school. You will want IDE advice from someone who does more work with the newer languages and current styles in education.

Remember, it is not the IDE choice you make, it is what you DO with it that counts. Choose one that seems powerful, natural, and fits your work flow so that you WANT to code more and better projects.
 
Old 06-08-2017, 04:41 PM   #3
Laserbeak
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Those are editors, not compilers. Although in some cases (like Xcode on the Mac), the editor is tied into the compiler so it can show real-time problems or hints with your code as you type.
 
Old 06-08-2017, 05:21 PM   #4
AwesomeMachine
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I think pinning down the terminology might be a good first step.
 
Old 06-20-2017, 07:59 AM   #5
Laserbeak
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Python isn't a compiled language, it's more like Perl, compiled on-the-fly. Java is a semi-compiled language, as it is compiled into a specialized byte-code that is interpreted by the java interpreter. By comparison, languages such as C are compiled directly into the target machine language code that is saved and runnable by any computer with a compatible architecture with no extra software required.
.

Last edited by Laserbeak; 06-20-2017 at 08:00 AM.
 
Old 06-20-2017, 12:21 PM   #6
wpeckham
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laserbeak View Post
Python isn't a compiled language, it's more like Perl, compiled on-the-fly. Java is a semi-compiled language, as it is compiled into a specialized byte-code that is interpreted by the java interpreter. By comparison, languages such as C are compiled directly into the target machine language code that is saved and runnable by any computer with a compatible architecture with no extra software required.
.
To be even more correct, almost any language can be implemented as an interpreted language (ala most common BASIC,PERL, PYTHON, and JAVA), or as a fully compiled language ( ala gcc, Pascal, FORTRAN ). I have used Pascal interpreters and compilers as well as BASIC interpreters and compilers.

What Laserbeak said is generally true for the most common implementations of those languages on the platforms in question.
Some languages have several different implementations, and you may need to pick and choose between them.
The important thing in your specific case is to pick implementations of your target language that are pretty compatible (at least source compatible) between your development platforms and that support your target hardware.

Java is an excellent choice for that. I dislike it, but it is very popular for good reason. Java interpreters have been ported to MANY hardware platforms.
 
Old 06-20-2017, 01:58 PM   #7
Laserbeak
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There are some languages that simply can not be fully compiled to machine code because they rely on things that can only be determined at run-time not compile-time. Some languages where it's not too big of a deal are mostly compiled but have a small helper program running alongside it that can "interpret" source code or some byte code of it when necessary (like Objective-C), while others have to just interpret the source code line by line every time the line is executed.
 
Old 06-20-2017, 03:08 PM   #8
suicidaleggroll
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Emacs is a text editor, not unlike Notepad or Wordpad. It is not an IDE, it's not a compiler, all it does is edit text files. You can use some plugin functionality to add support for other things and make it act more like an IDE, but at its heart it's just a text editor.

Eclipse is an IDE, still not a compiler. An IDE is basically a text editor and wrapper for the compiler built into one program. Like a text editor that's designed and only used for programming.

In either case you still need a compiler, which will depend on the language you're writing in (python doesn't use a compiler, its an interpreted language).

As for what you should use, that's up to you, a text editor is a text editor. I like Emacs, it has good support for syntax highlighting, auto-indenting, etc. I switch between Emacs and VI when I'm programming, Emacs for large development, VI for quick changes or touch-ups. I don't use IDEs because I don't like IDEs, I much prefer a text editor for writing the program, and manually compiling on the command line with a make file or build script.

If you're going to share your program between Windows and Linux, you are GOING to run into problems with line termination. Time to become intimately familiar with the Linux tools dos2unix and unix2dos, which can convert the line endings in ASCII files between the two formats.
 
  


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