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MauiB 10-06-2017 01:35 AM

Command list
 
I am very new to linux and read a lot of forums and reviews and decided to take a stab with Fedora. I want to make one of my office PC's a file server and is looking for a command list, it will be greatfully appreciated. I tried NDG free linux essentials course via Cisco NETACAD, but don't really have time to finish.

pan64 10-06-2017 01:40 AM

it will be really hard if you have no time....
here you can find the list of commands, but I don't think is is usable: http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/dir_all_alphabetic.html

MauiB 10-06-2017 01:48 AM

Thank you pan64. I will go through and have a look

JJJCR 10-06-2017 01:49 AM

Command list is one thing, understanding how the system works is a good thing.

Quite a few sites on the web that offers command list on Linux.

Links:
https://www.tecmint.com/60-commands-...administrator/
https://files.fosswire.com/2007/08/fwunixref.pdf

Welcome to LQ!

ondoho 10-06-2017 01:54 AM

i've never heard of a linux user who first learned all commands, and then started using it.
so maybe you tell us what sort of "commands" you need, or, more precisely, what you are trying to accomplish and where you fail?

Turbocapitalist 10-06-2017 01:59 AM

You can get a full list of the programs available on your particular machine using apropos

Code:

apropos -w '*'
apropos -w '*' | less

However, like with anything else, you will need to invest a little time regularly to learn.

Code:

man apropos
man less
man man

One point about learning is that these are not "commands" to be memorized in advance. There are way too many and way too many options. That is still true even if you limit yourself to ones you use frequently. What you can do to ensure your success it to learn to navigate the manual pages and deal with everything from a "just in time" approach rather than "just in case".

Another point is that the shell is not just an advanced interface that has been refined and streamlined over more than four decades. It is also a full scripting language. So my main suggestion would be to approach the task as one of learning a programming language. You'll save a lot of time and headache that way.

MauiB 10-06-2017 02:13 AM

@ondoho. What I did was installed Fedora on my laptop, dual boot with windows. I am familiar on how linux works, as I explained, I was busy with an essential course via NDG. I want to start making myself familiar with the commands and what they do.

MauiB 10-06-2017 02:16 AM

@Turbocapitalist. Thank you for the information. I am going to start spending more time with linux. It is one of the things I must specialize in.

Turbocapitalist 10-06-2017 02:41 AM

No problem. As you see in the manual page, the utility apropos can use additional options. So if you want to just look at the manual pages for only the programs themselves and no configuration files, libraries, or specifications you can tell at it to list only pages from sections 1 and 8.

Code:

apropos --sections 1,8 -w '*'
apropos --sections 1,8 -w '*' | less

The manual pages are good references, usually. They do vary in quality but the goal is to be a technical reference. Tutorials are done on the web. So expect that the manual pages can be used to look up some concise details but that you'll have to turn to the web for tutorials. You'll alternate between the two methods a lot.

MauiB 10-06-2017 02:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Turbocapitalist (Post 5766851)
No problem. As you see in the manual page, the utility apropos can use additional options. So if you want to just look at the manual pages for only the programs themselves and no configuration files, libraries, or specifications you can tell at it to list only pages from sections 1 and 8.

Code:

apropos --sections 1,8 -w '*'
apropos --sections 1,8 -w '*' | less

The manual pages are good references, usually. They do vary in quality but the goal is to be a technical reference. Tutorials are done on the web. So expect that the manual pages can be used to look up some concise details but that you'll have to turn to the web for tutorials. You'll alternate between the two methods a lot.

Great help thanks a lot. I appreciate it. I owe you a couple of beers

jlinkels 10-06-2017 04:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Turbocapitalist (Post 5766843)
You can get a full list of the programs available on your particular machine using apropos

I agree it is useless to "learn commands". However it is useful to see now and then which commands are available to do something in a smarter or more efficient way.
Like apropos itself. I remember that I have seen it mentioned before, but I totally forgot it existence. I feel it is getting recursive here. You need apropos to list the existence of apropos. :)
It is a good addition to filter only on (5) manual pages. For interacting with the shell usually only those commands are relevant. So
Code:

apropos -w -s 5 '*'
This yields a list of 400 commands. Still too many to learn. But in total (all sections) almost 4000 man pages are available.

jlinkels

chrism01 10-08-2017 11:45 PM

... and quoting from the man page
Quote:

-k Equivalent to apropos.
;)

Turbocapitalist 10-08-2017 11:50 PM

apropos and man are fairly close but the former allows the -w option for a 'wildcard' pattern. In the latter it does something else and the trick with the asterisk won't work.

onebuck 10-09-2017 09:34 AM

Member response
 
Hi,
Welcome to LQ!

Quote:

Originally Posted by MauiB (Post 5766829)
I am very new to linux and read a lot of forums and reviews and decided to take a stab with Fedora. I want to make one of my office PC's a file server and is looking for a command list, it will be greatfully appreciated. I tried NDG free linux essentials course via Cisco NETACAD, but don't really have time to finish.

Sure, you can use 'man command' but there are other means to learn;

Quote:

Just a few links to aid you to gaining some understanding.

I would start at 1,2 &3 or 9 while the other links will enhance your experience;

Some of the material may seem dated but you will get the basics.

Quote:

"Knowledge is of two kinds. We Know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information upon it."- Samuel Johnson
Hope this helps.
Have fun & enjoy!
:hattip:

frankbell 10-09-2017 08:55 PM

There are thousands of Linux commands, many of which have variations depending on the command line arguments and switches. It's likely better to start with a few basic commands, then learn the others as you need them.

I just looked at my BASH history, The commands I use most commonly are "ls," "rm," "pwd," "man [topie]" and "apropos [subject]," "cp," "cd," and "mv."

A web search for basic Linux commands will turn up a number of helpful links.


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