LinuxQuestions.org

LinuxQuestions.org (/questions/)
-   Linux - Newbie (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/)
-   -   ci command (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/ci-command-520950/)

JRink 01-19-2007 03:24 PM

ci command
 
I just installed freeradius on a CentOS machine, and the instructions tell me to peform the following after the installation..

--------
$ cd /etc/raddb
$ mkdir RCS
$ ci -l *
Type a commit message, anything will do.
------

What is the ci command? I don't seem to have it installed when I try using it or doing a 'man ci'. is this something that I can install from yum? What is ci anyways? Thanks!

JR

[KIA]aze 01-19-2007 03:33 PM

I don't know, but google/linux told me this:
http://node1.yo-linux.com/cgi-bin/ma..._command=ci(1)
:rolleyes:

haertig 01-19-2007 04:14 PM

ci is an RCS command ("Revision Control System"), used for source code control. i.e., it keeps track of older versions of files as you modify them over time. You can go back to previous versions easily should you accidently screw-up the most recent version.

Read up on RCS at: http://www.faqs.org/docs/Linux-HOWTO/CVS-RCS-HOWTO.html

Back in the "old days", it was "cp file file.bak". Then came SCCS ("Source Code Control System"). Then RCS. Then CVS (I think that one means "Concurent Versioning System"). CVS adds to RCS the ability of multiple people to be doing simultaneous editing, among other things. If it's just YOU using the system, CVS is overkill. RCS is just fine. There are other source code control systems out there as well. "subversion" being one such example you may have heard of.

Many people don't use source code control. For the life of me I can't figure out why. They often times come here asking "I accidently blew away this critical file, how do I get it back?"


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:22 PM.