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Old 01-19-2003, 06:31 PM   #1
kidwired
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chmod u+s = numeric?


I have a file that needs to be set u+s. I dont know how this translates to numeric values.
I have it set owner is right and 755, is this right?
 
Old 01-19-2003, 08:49 PM   #2
wdingus
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Why convert it to a numeric value? You can do just as the example you give: chmod u+s filename works just fine...

u=user
g=group
o=other
+r +w +x +s +???
-r -w -x -s

all valid

Numerically you can take away w from group, add x to other, add s to user and other things all at once in one command where with + and - would take multiple commands.
 
Old 01-19-2003, 08:49 PM   #3
stickman
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Try 4755.
 
Old 01-19-2003, 11:27 PM   #4
finegan
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To break down the numbers:

1 - read
2 - write
4 - executable

add them together and you get the setting in order of: owner, group, else

So 755 is (1+2+4)owner, 7 who can do all three... group and world only have 5, readable and executable, 1+4.

If you're using a fourth number that first one refers to the sticky bit, a setting of 4 makes it so that the file, when executed, runs as the owner, not the user that executed the file. There are a bunch of stick-bit settings and I don't remember them all, but needless to say a file that is 4777 and is owned by root is a nuclear bomb because anyone can write the file and then execute it as root.

Cheers,

Finegan
 
Old 01-20-2003, 12:24 AM   #5
kidwired
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wdingus- so I can understand what I'm doing. I'm used to working w/ numeric values however the docs for the app I'm working w/ are all u+s etc. I dont want to chmod x+x 100 files if they are already chmod'd correctly.

finegan- ahh thanks for the explanation of sticky bit that helps alot. In this case 4755 is owned by the app.

Thanks everyone!
/kid
 
  


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