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-   -   Change IPv6 to IPv4 for faster internet browsing? (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/change-ipv6-to-ipv4-for-faster-internet-browsing-4175575441/)

Higgsboson 03-20-2016 02:44 PM

Change IPv6 to IPv4 for faster internet browsing?
 
I have Debian 8 (jessie) recently installed. Despite increasing RAM and using a fast ethernet cat 6 cable, internet browsing is still slow.

I've found that new linux distros run on IPv6 for browsing by default.
However, it seems that the older IPv4 standard enables faster browsing and is also more secure for the user.

There seem to be many methods of changing the OS to browse back in IPv4 mode.
Can anyone please confirm the merits of IPv4 and the best way to change the OS to this version? Thanks in advance.

hydrurga 03-20-2016 03:51 PM

These may interest you:

http://superuser.com/questions/18160...ster-than-ipv4 - speed

https://www.sophos.com/en-us/securit...h-to-ipv6.aspx - security

Have you ensured that you use a fast DNS server?

https://www.howtoforge.com/tutorial/...tion-on-linux/

Higgsboson 03-21-2016 02:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hydrurga (Post 5518785)

Thank you. These are interesting links. The first link shows people favouring the new IPv6 standard.
Sophos (software security company) however says:
'Donít enable IPv6 until youíre fully ready. Many platforms come with IPv6 enabled by default, but make sure itís switched off until properly configured. Many current firewalls focus exclusively on IPv4 and will not filter IPv6 traffic at all...'
It then goes on to advertise its wares.

I read on Wikipedia that IPv6 is less secure because it more easily shows your MAC address https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv6#Privacy.
Yet no-one seems to know that.

Quote:

Have you ensured that you use a fast DNS server?

https://www.howtoforge.com/tutorial/...tion-on-linux/
Yes, it looks like using OpenDNS may be a good idea.
This link is dodgy as hell! The guy tells you to use Google Public DNS. He then tells you to switch off your firewall to get better internet speed!

There's a lot of conflicting ideas about how to efficiently use the net and preserve your anonymity. Quite unbelievable really.

hydrurga 03-21-2016 02:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Higgsboson (Post 5519278)
This link is dodgy as hell! The guy tells you to use Google Public DNS. He then tells you to switch off your firewall to get better internet speed!

:) Oops, I didn't notice that, although it was a bit more nuanced than just "switch it off". I hope no-one would be that stupid.

Personally I use the OpenDNS 208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220.

jpollard 03-21-2016 02:46 PM

IPv6 only reveals a MAC address if it is directed to do so, and normally, would not. As I remember it only uses a MAC address if it is directed to generate IPv6 addresses... and would then use a MAC address as the point of last resort.

Some methods use an IPv4 address as the last 32 bits... and the upper 32 bits is the local network number.

The usual problem with speed and IPv6 is the name lookup. Once the connection is established it
depends on whether you are using IPv6 over IPv4 links (really slow).

jefro 03-21-2016 02:47 PM

I've never seen any tests that would indicate that ipv4 would perform at different speeds than ipv6. I've never heard of any suggestion that the two were different in terms of security either.

If I were to desire changing off of IPv6 then I'd disable it in my router, disable in OS and disable in browser.

Higgsboson 03-21-2016 03:16 PM

Wikipedia says:

'IPv6 is not foreseen to supplant IPv4 instantaneously. Both protocols will continue to operate simultaneously for some time'.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv6#T...ion_mechanisms

Since new linux installs have IPv6 running by default, perhaps it may be appropriate to change back to IPv4 to see if there is faster browsing speed.
If there is no difference, then you have the option of returning to IPv6.

jefro 03-21-2016 04:59 PM

IPv4 has to continue to run for a very long time. Sure there are 4to6 sort of things out but for backward compatibility you'd need to keep ipv4.

If your isp doesn't have support or limited support for ipv6 then you have no need for it.

Shadow_7 03-21-2016 07:39 PM

If you make the connection manually.

# dhclient -4 -v wlan0

Where -4 says to use IPv4 (initially). By default it tries IPv6 first. There's also a number /proc/sys/net/ipv6/ stuff that you can disable to force ipv4. But if the thing you are connecting to ONLY does IPv6, then you don't really have the option. And other options as well.

# iw dev wlan0 set 4addr on

YMMV

Higgsboson 03-21-2016 09:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shadow_7 (Post 5519420)
If you make the connection manually.
# dhclient -4 -v wlan0

Where -4 says to use IPv4 (initially).

By default it tries IPv6 first.

Wow, that's amazing! I didn't know that. Thank you!

Quote:

There's also a number /proc/sys/net/ipv6/
What's the number?

Quote:

stuff that you can disable to force ipv4.
Wow. What's the 'stuff'?

Quote:

But if the thing you are connecting to ONLY does IPv6, then you don't really have the option.
The 'thing' I'm connecting to is a Debian operating system. I think it will give me the choice to run either IPv4 or IPv6.
The internet is mostly IPv4.

Quote:

# iw dev wlan0 set 4addr on

YMMV

I hear you, dude.
# ab cde fghijk000 fck ske sm ppl!

Shadow_7 03-22-2016 07:18 PM

Hmmm. Seems most of the /proc/sys/net/ipv6 stuff is settings, not the enable/disable (1/0) options they used to be. So ignore that. The iw one is to make bridging work (sort of), with brctl stuff and promisc mode enabled which had defaults change between 2.6.32 and 2.6.34-ish. I really haven't been able to make bridging work (without masquerading) since 2.6.32. Outside of -4 on dhclient, which is mostly for speed since IPv6 has to timeout before it tries IPv4 on my network, I'm not sure anymore, soo many changes. It seems like ifconfig has some options to set/unset things, although we're supposed to use "ip" for a lot of that stuff these days. Not that I have any useful knowledge of ip outside of showing current settings. Perhaps this might help.

http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Linux+IPv6-HOWTO/x1073.html


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