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Old 05-09-2007, 06:35 PM   #1
jacatone
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Can you just boot into root


I can see the whole root thing as very useful in a network environment where you wouldn't want your users tinkering with system files and such. But as a single user, it becomes a real pain after a while. Is there a way to configure Linux to just boot into root? Thanks.
 
Old 05-09-2007, 06:49 PM   #2
jay73
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Depending on the distribution you are using, yes. Some allow you to log in as "root" with the root password. Still, on a non-networked system, it's the worst decision you could make. As a regular user, you will be working in a limited environment most of the time; any errors you make can be undone by switching to root. If you are root already, however, you're pretty much lost.
 
Old 05-09-2007, 07:51 PM   #3
bouchecl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jacatone
I can see the whole root thing as very useful in a network environment where you wouldn't want your users tinkering with system files and such. But as a single user, it becomes a real pain after a while. Is there a way to configure Linux to just boot into root? Thanks.
Listen to the teachings given to Moses on Mount Sinai, my son:

"Thou shalt not take the name of the Root in vain".

It even takes precedence over "Thou shalt honor Linus and RMS"!

Last edited by bouchecl; 05-09-2007 at 11:04 PM.
 
Old 05-09-2007, 09:24 PM   #4
jacatone
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I'm just learning Linux, so any errors I make aren't earth shattering.

I always thought logging in with my username (root) and password just allowed access to the desktop. How would I configure say the latest Mepis distro(KDE)to automatically give me root privileges? Thanks.
 
Old 05-09-2007, 09:35 PM   #5
jay73
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You can't . Afaik, Mepis is one of those that categorically refuses to give root access to the graphical desktop.

And why do you need root permissions all that much? Whenever you need to do anything as root, you can simply launch a terminal and type in:l
su -
followed by your root password
and to become a regular user again:
exit
You can also set up sudo by running visudo (as root)

btw, it's precisely beginners that are liable to make earth-shattering errors.
 
Old 05-09-2007, 10:47 PM   #6
SlowCoder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jacatone
I'm just learning Linux, so any errors I make aren't earth shattering.

I always thought logging in with my username (root) and password just allowed access to the desktop. How would I configure say the latest Mepis distro(KDE)to automatically give me root privileges? Thanks.
Good admin practice is to NOT use root unless you NEED to, and you should limit your access as much as possible to reduce the probability of blowing your computer up.

When I was new, I thought it was a pain also, having to su to root. But as time went on, it became second nature, and not a bother at all. I actually feel more secure knowing that right now, writing this post as a normal user, I cannot do any damage to the system, except to the files in the account I am logged into. It's a good feeling, once you get used to it.
 
Old 05-09-2007, 10:55 PM   #7
sidney.harrell
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The sudo environment of Ubuntu might fit your style easier. It just annoys you for your password before you make system changes. But you should have to think twice before you do anything that could nuke your system.
 
Old 05-09-2007, 11:03 PM   #8
rickh
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The very idea is disgusting!
 
Old 05-09-2007, 11:08 PM   #9
vtel57
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Graphical login to Root is a very, very bad idea. As a matter of fact, this was always one of the greatest downfalls of the Windows operating system, where Windows users could login and destroy their system as Admin. This is NOT a good idea at all. Take it from the more experienced Linux users here... don't be Root if you don't need to be. A friend of mine from another forum has a very appropriate sigline about Root:

Root, the power to destroy over and over again.

I've trashed entire systems with one inadvertent terminal command as Root. Be smart. The OS is designed this way for a reason.

Have FUN!
 
Old 05-09-2007, 11:30 PM   #10
AceofSpades19
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always being logged in as root is a bad idea especaillz if your a newbie
 
Old 05-09-2007, 11:31 PM   #11
bouchecl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jacatone
I'm just learning Linux, so any errors I make aren't earth shattering.

I always thought logging in with my username (root) and password just allowed access to the desktop. How would I configure say the latest Mepis distro(KDE)to automatically give me root privileges? Thanks.

Sorry if my previous post dubious humor offended you, but the big letter warnings about running as root is something I read so often when I first started using Linux a couple of years ago. The lesson stuck.

There are some good reasons for not invoking root unless it is really essential. As previous posteres mentioned, it protects you from some mistake while learning the intricacies of Linux. Browsing as root is also a bad idea, because it potentially exposes your whole system to the nastiness outside (when you browse or execute a nasty program as a regular user, it only exposes your files, not the whole filesystem).

In fact, running as a super-user by default is one of the biggest criticisms made against Micro$soft's operating systems. That's a big reason why viruses, worms and assorted nasties proliferate on that platform. Of course, you need these administrative privileges all the time on Windoze, because of their flawed architecture; in Linux you don't.

If I were in your shoes, I'd learn how to use the commande su and sudo in Mepis to access those godly privileges, but only when the wizardry is really needed.

Last edited by bouchecl; 05-09-2007 at 11:36 PM.
 
Old 05-09-2007, 11:32 PM   #12
syg00
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Quote:
I've trashed entire systems with one inadvertent terminal command as Root.
Learning opportunity.
Never seen a trashed system a re-install and/or restore couldn't fix.
 
Old 05-09-2007, 11:34 PM   #13
vtel57
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The re-install did fix it. Still, it was a PITA.
 
Old 05-10-2007, 12:16 AM   #14
masonm
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Newbies ask this same question or something similar on a regular basis and the answer is always the same. It's a very bad idea.

But it's your system, if you want to trash it that's your business. Just be aware that not running with admin permissions is one of the biggest reasons Linux is more secure out of the box than Windows. Kinda defeats the idea of running a more secure OS doesn't it? But then, everyone has a right to do stupid things.
 
Old 05-10-2007, 02:05 AM   #15
jacatone
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I can understand what your saying. I managed to screw up Puppy Linux today and I have no idea what I did. Puppy automatically boots as root.
 
  


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