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Old 02-24-2014, 07:58 PM   #1
malcarada
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Question Can Linux damage my screen when setting up the resolution? My screen is broken


I recently decided to try a new Linux distribution for my old Asus EeePC. The distribution's name is an Android port called Android-x86 (http://www.android-x86.org/), and specially designed for netbooks.

I tried this distribution as a live CD first and my screen started to blink like crazy, I had to reboot a few times and finally I got to play for a few seconds with the new distro until the screen blinked again like crazy and I am now left with a working netbook (drive spins) but a permanent black screen, when I boot the computer the disk spins according to the lights but nothing is visible, the installed Puppy Linux no longer comes up and because the BIOS messages are not visible I just believe that the screen is forever broken.

This was an old netbook, around 5 years old, I was wondering if it is possible that the new Android Linux distro I tried damaged my screen by testing new frequencies or if it is just a coincidence that the screen broke while I was testing this new distro.

The bottom line is to find out if testing a new Linux distribution could damage a screen if it sets the wrong screen frequency while it is automatically being set up.

Thank you

Last edited by malcarada; 02-24-2014 at 08:04 PM.
 
Old 02-24-2014, 08:22 PM   #2
Emerson
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All contemporary hardware protects itself from incompatible video modes. Furthermore, EDID contains all needed information to run in a compatible video mode. Both Linux and Xorg read EDID.
Conclusion. If you even cannot see BIOS screen then your monitor definitely is dead.
 
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Old 02-24-2014, 09:40 PM   #3
malcarada
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Does the hardware protection means that the screen probably died of old age and not because of the new Linux distribution I was testing? This was a 5 year old computer so I am not sure how contemporary that is, it was one of the first EeePC in the market.

But it is good to know that I can test new distros in new laptops without fear of causing any screen damage.

Thank you

Last edited by malcarada; 02-24-2014 at 09:44 PM.
 
Old 02-25-2014, 05:29 AM   #4
roy_lt_69
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Sorry to hear your screen maybe dead, but have you tried removing the internal battery (CMOS) in order to reset the setting to factory defaults?
The computer might have function keys to change the display settings outside of an actual O/S.
Also does it have an external display port (VGA)?
If yes then you can try plugging in an external display!

Just a thought, since you have nothing to lose!
 
Old 02-25-2014, 07:17 AM   #5
malcarada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roy_lt_69 View Post
Sorry to hear your screen maybe dead, but have you tried removing the internal battery (CMOS) in order to reset the setting to factory defaults?
The computer might have function keys to change the display settings outside of an actual O/S.
Also does it have an external display port (VGA)?
If yes then you can try plugging in an external display!
The EeePC does have a VGA port but this is not practical, netbooks are meant to be portable and they have a tiny keyboard, I can't use it as a desktop. Removing the internal CMOS battery is also not practical in a sealed netbook, there is not that easy to get access to it without breaking anything. I am writing off the loses, the computer is 5 years old so already did its service.
 
Old 02-25-2014, 08:57 AM   #6
Soadyheid
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I think that plugging a display into the VGA port would be more diagnostic measure than permanent. If you get a display then, Yes, your screen may be dead but you may be able to reset the BIOS to cure it and/or rescue any data on the netbook if it boots.

It's worth a go. (I've still got my original EeePC 701 4Gb netbook!)

Play Bonny!

 
Old 02-25-2014, 12:23 PM   #7
RockDoctor
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Not sure about the EeePC, but my Acer Aspire One ZG5 has a key combination (Fn-F6, or something like that) to toggle the netbook's display. You didn't by chance happen to hit such a key combo?
 
Old 02-27-2014, 06:18 PM   #8
roy_lt_69
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Some portables have a function key switch to activate display to an external monitor either mirroring what is on the built-in screen or turns off the built in screen and only displays via the external screen especially if the resolution is greater than the built-in screen's resolution.
Check your user manual!
In fact a quick google returned:
Asus support

As for the cmos battery, well you did say you were writing the asus off as a loss, so what do you have to lose? There are youtube videos to help even.
 
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Old 02-27-2014, 06:50 PM   #9
malcarada
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I am starting to think that maybe I got rid of a working netbook... it is too late now to test anything else.

I learned my lesson, but I am not happy that EeePC would turn off the monitor without any warning and expect the user to find out that the problem might be that certain key was clicked on. I actually clicked all of them to get the image back, which is what most people would do. Never mind, let's consider this thread solved since the netbook is no longer around.

BTW: I accessed the CMOS after breaking the keyboard.

Thank you for your help.

Last edited by malcarada; 02-27-2014 at 06:53 PM.
 
  


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