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Old 09-15-2015, 04:03 AM   #1
Harshit_24
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Build kernel and packages to iso image


Currently I have a floppy disk which contains the OS. After installing OS, it asks for the MODs. MODs contains the basic Linux rpm packages like python, apache, etc. Now I want them to bind all the MODs & floppy into a single image ISO file.

Now it asks for MODs after inserting floppy disk. If I put floppy disk's data & all the MODs data into a USB, then how can I prevent it from asking floppy disks & just search in the USB itself or better how can I bind all files into a single ISO files

Thanks.
 
Old 09-15-2015, 09:55 PM   #2
theAdmiral
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harshit_24 View Post
If I put floppy disk's data & all the MODs data into a USB, then how can I prevent it from asking floppy disks & just search in the USB...
Thanks.
I understand that you don't get asked for data from the floppy until you insert the floppy. If you do not want to have the computer ask for data from the floppy, then don't insert the floppy.

By the way, which distro are you running?
 
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Old 09-15-2015, 09:57 PM   #3
jefro
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An iso is normally meant to be an optical disc copy in a special way. Not sure it is what you mean. But one might be able to create a cd that has a floppy as track one. Then data can be at track 2. I used to do that in BeOS.

I suspect that you can clone this finished install in a different way. Letting us know what it is may help but usually you can use G4U to clone it off by a bit by bit copy of your hard drive.
 
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Old 09-15-2015, 11:11 PM   #4
Harshit_24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theAdmiral View Post
I understand that you don't get asked for data from the floppy until you insert the floppy. If you do not want to have the computer ask for data from the floppy, then don't insert the floppy.

By the way, which distro are you running?
I am using siemens industrial linux version 2.4.36

It is a very old system which I want to update. I want to remove the floppy installation system to USB based installation system.

May be you didn't understand my question. My Linux is distro is divided into parts i.e. main OS in floppy disk & other basic softwares which comes with Linux like apache, python, perl, etc presents in MODs. So, I want all these to become a single part in a USB, not in different disks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jefro View Post
An iso is normally meant to be an optical disc copy in a special way. Not sure it is what you mean. But one might be able to create a cd that has a floppy as track one. Then data can be at track 2. I used to do that in BeOS.

I suspect that you can clone this finished install in a different way. Letting us know what it is may help but usually you can use G4U to clone it off by a bit by bit copy of your hard drive.
How can I do that ? What's the process ? How can I I combine all the different parts of the MODs & floppys.
 
Old 09-16-2015, 08:56 AM   #5
theAdmiral
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harshit_24 View Post
How can I do that ? What's the process ? How can I I combine all the different parts of the MODs & floppys.
I hate to say this, but I do not know. I do not even know what is an MOD.

But, based on my limited experience (with creating a bootable USB from an ISO) I would imagine that to create a bootable USB from an ISO you would generally speaking first have to start with creating the ISO. You would have to know enough about software programming to edit the source files that are going to make up the ISO, so that the source files behave as if they are going to make up a different medium (one unified ISO file). Essentially an ISO is a lot like an archive file containing folders, files within folders, and other assorted files. Once you have edited the sources files that are going into the ISO, then you create the ISO from the source files. Then once you create the ISO, then you create the bootable USB. It is not impossible, but just may be beyond the scope of most of the general knowledge in this forum. I've been registered in this forum for a few years, and I have to say that your question poses the most challenging task that I have yet to see.
 
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Old 09-16-2015, 09:33 AM   #6
translator1111
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Dear Harshit25,
theAdmiral is right.
Assuming that MOD are parts of programs or application that are not the kernel and are not the "essential nucleus" in order linux to work, you could make an iso with an application called
growiso
You can find what is does in the internet if you wiite "man growiso"
you can add all the files of the futire iso to the command growiso,
once you have an iso file,
you can put it in an usb
In order to put in an usb you can use available software or another command called dd
dd (disk destroyer) does not warn you when you have made a mistake, so you better understand how it works looking up "man dd"
What it does it takes the iso image and put it in the media you chose using a bit mode.
you have to be patient after inputting the command your terminal will not react to anything except CTRL+C (break the command and exit)
It can take almost 30 minutes to save an ISO image into a USB disk with dd.
dd usage is
dd if=/home/mylinux.iso of=/dev/sdc
if=(means input file, that is the file and path where you iso image is saved)
of: is the device name where your usb is plugged in.
you can find your device name using
dmesg -tail

Regarding your request stopping the cumputer to ask the disquette it could be related to the fact that some commands in the kernel and loooking for libraries with a path in a disquette device.
After putting everything in an ISO you might need to look about this place and rewrite it, if possible, otherwise the kernel might not find the place where the library has to be found.
Feel free to ask more,
M.
 
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Old 09-16-2015, 08:56 PM   #7
jefro
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Not sure you will get the usb results you expect. That is a bit old and I don't recall what the usb boot ability is on that. Might be possible to fool it or add stuff.

What I meant was to create your finished install and then clone it off. That clone can be placed on a CD if you wish and you could use a G4U floppy to restore it.
 
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Old 09-16-2015, 11:24 PM   #8
Harshit_24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theAdmiral View Post
I hate to say this, but I do not know. I do not even know what is an MOD.

But, based on my limited experience (with creating a bootable USB from an ISO) I would imagine that to create a bootable USB from an ISO you would generally speaking first have to start with creating the ISO. You would have to know enough about software programming to edit the source files that are going to make up the ISO, so that the source files behave as if they are going to make up a different medium (one unified ISO file). Essentially an ISO is a lot like an archive file containing folders, files within folders, and other assorted files. Once you have edited the sources files that are going into the ISO, then you create the ISO from the source files. Then once you create the ISO, then you create the bootable USB. It is not impossible, but just may be beyond the scope of most of the general knowledge in this forum. I've been registered in this forum for a few years, and I have to say that your question poses the most challenging task that I have yet to see.
MOD is Magneto-optical drive. I don't know where the files exists in the floppy disk which contains the path to ask for MODs. If I could know, I can change it to local USB path only.

Quote:
Originally Posted by translator1111 View Post
Dear Harshit25,
theAdmiral is right.
Assuming that MOD are parts of programs or application that are not the kernel and are not the "essential nucleus" in order linux to work, you could make an iso with an application called
growiso
You can find what is does in the internet if you wiite "man growiso"
you can add all the files of the futire iso to the command growiso,
once you have an iso file,
you can put it in an usb
In order to put in an usb you can use available software or another command called dd
dd (disk destroyer) does not warn you when you have made a mistake, so you better understand how it works looking up "man dd"
What it does it takes the iso image and put it in the media you chose using a bit mode.
you have to be patient after inputting the command your terminal will not react to anything except CTRL+C (break the command and exit)
It can take almost 30 minutes to save an ISO image into a USB disk with dd.
dd usage is
dd if=/home/mylinux.iso of=/dev/sdc
if=(means input file, that is the file and path where you iso image is saved)
of: is the device name where your usb is plugged in.
you can find your device name using
dmesg -tail

Regarding your request stopping the cumputer to ask the disquette it could be related to the fact that some commands in the kernel and loooking for libraries with a path in a disquette device.
After putting everything in an ISO you might need to look about this place and rewrite it, if possible, otherwise the kernel might not find the place where the library has to be found.
Feel free to ask more,
M.
I could create the ISO file of multiple folders by any software, but as I said above I don't know where the files exists in the floppy disk which contains the path to ask for MODs. If I could know, I can change it to local USB path only, then it will copy & install rpm packages from the local USB only rather than asking for MODs. Then I could bind all of them in a single ISO to be installed via USB.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jefro View Post
Not sure you will get the usb results you expect. That is a bit old and I don't recall what the usb boot ability is on that. Might be possible to fool it or add stuff.

What I meant was to create your finished install and then clone it off. That clone can be placed on a CD if you wish and you could use a G4U floppy to restore it.
After installing whole OS & rpm packages, they would be installed files. It would be difficult to install on other systems.
 
Old 09-17-2015, 06:46 AM   #9
translator1111
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Dear Harshit_24
you seem to know about industrial use of computers more than me.
However if siemens industrial linux has a kernel and there are config files, maybe it would help whether you paste a tree of the file structure of the OS disquette
or
you can try to contact a forum specialized in siemens industrial linux like this from higher versions (https://forum.acronis.com/forum/1428...c2dMowGJ5e-giA)

I have never seen the kernel file before today https://www.kernel.org/, but as Linus said once all in Linux is a file.
You probably know what happens when the installation runs (http://askubuntu.com/questions/54093...under-the-hood)
so, you only have to find the files and the scripts in the kernell that are asking for the MODs
You might ask in the fotum above (acronis.com) how does it work in higher versions and assume that it will work in previous versions in a similar way.
once you have figured out everything and copied in a directory, you might be able of cloning and making the ISO.
Install it in the USB you already know.
Faithfully,
M.
 
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