LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 10-15-2004, 02:32 PM   #1
jeopardyracing
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Posts: 175

Rep: Reputation: 30
Applications in Debian / Knoppix


I'm primarily an OS X user but use distros like RH9 and Fedora on my Dell as well. Recently I set up a hard drive install of Knoppix which I really like and I plan to use it alot more. I am trying to understand more broadly how applications are handled in Linux, mostly for my own learning.

In OS X, our applications are created in 'bundles' that reside in

/applications/

in our file system. Although they do create some files outside of that bundle (preference files mainly, in ~/libarary/preferences/) the application bundles are surprisingly self-contained.

In Redhat and Knoppix, if I install an application manually as opposed to using apt-get I will often just put it in my user account directory (ie ~/ or some such) but of course the basic applications that originally come with the install aren't there and I assume this really isn't best practice.

My question is a broad one: is the stuff in /usr/share/ part, all, or none of the parts of applications running on a Linux system? Or is the custom for Linux applications to put system-wide applications elsewhere, and if so, where? And how well bundled are they - do they tend to reside in one directy and be more or less self contained or do they have to do more of an "install" where they put stuff in different parts of the machine? When I speak of applications in this context I'm thinking of things like Mozilla, or Open Office, or Nano (which I used apt-get to put on my Knoppix install).
 
Old 10-15-2004, 02:51 PM   #2
crm
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Location: leeds - UK
Distribution: Gentoo Stage 1 on Riser FS 4
Posts: 204

Rep: Reputation: 30
as best i understand it...
windows isntalls everything in the folder you tell it to
OSX installs things where they are efficent but keeps the bulk of the code in /Applications
most linux distros store things where they are needed:

/usr/share will be the bulk of the code for the small programs installed by the user
/bin will be the BINary(executible) files for mostally all programs installed by the stystem
/usr/bin will be the binary files installed by the user
/usr/sbin will be the dangerous programs installed by the system for root only (fdisk etc...)
/opt will house all the really big applications (open office.. and mozilla (i think) )

im sure there are more... but i cant think of them... its all very confusing
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What's the difference between debian and other debian-based distro like knoppix? Akhran Debian 11 08-28-2005 07:07 PM
Stripping Debian down to only neccesary applications SetAbomination Debian 7 11-29-2004 02:51 PM
Applications crashing in KDE 3.2.2 (Knoppix 3.4/Kernel version 2.6.6) a slacker Linux - General 0 05-25-2004 09:06 AM
Autostarting applications on debian Gameon Debian 3 01-03-2004 08:55 AM
knoppix to go debian sockknitter Debian 1 12-18-2003 07:13 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:43 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration