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Old 03-03-2014, 03:01 AM   #1
benten01
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Question An aspiring Ubuntu systems administrator


hello everyone, i am currently doing my computer science degree and though software development is not my thing i have a hidden love for Linux systems and would like to learn more about Linux systems and Linux system administration. Could you be so kind as to being my guide on what is should read to one day be a GURU in Linux systems?
 
Old 03-03-2014, 04:26 AM   #2
chrism01
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Start with
http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz

then refer to these manuals/books
www.linuxtopia.org

You definitely need to install and play with Linux; its the only way...
 
Old 03-03-2014, 06:33 AM   #3
Habitual
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https://help.ubuntu.com/community/CommandLineResources
http://www.tldp.org/guides.html
 
Old 03-03-2014, 06:47 AM   #4
Mankind75
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There used to be an "Ubuntu Certified Professional" certification from Canonical a few years ago. You can still buy some of the books for the certification to learn what an "Ubuntu" person had to know.
 
Old 03-03-2014, 06:48 AM   #5
brianL
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Another good site/book:
http://linuxcommand.org/
 
Old 03-03-2014, 12:17 PM   #6
snowpine
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Hang out on LinuxQuestions.org, see what kind of questions real-world people are actually asking, try to answer the questions, research if you don't know the answer.

Bonus: You will be helping people as you learn.

---------- Post added 03-03-14 at 01:17 PM ----------

Hang out on LinuxQuestions.org, see what kind of questions real-world people are actually asking, try to answer the questions, research if you don't know the answer.

Bonus: You will be helping people as you learn.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-03-2014, 03:09 PM   #7
jefro
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Almost any of the classes, books and courses in other distro's could help. I'd consider the Red Hat and Suse stuff and maybe some BSD stuff before ubuntu. Those 3 would tend to be used or useful in larger companies. The BSD helps toward unix systems.
 
Old 03-03-2014, 06:01 PM   #8
byau
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From a sysadmin point of view, I really like referenes. However from a newbie point of view, you are only getting commands and such and it's not always practical for real life. One good book i read a long time ago was "The Sorceror's Apprentice" which was a newbie sysadmin guide. Even though it did not apply to Ubuntu, the lessons were in a very practical order as to what you'd find as you gained experience as a sysadmin. You could then take the lesson subject matter and find out how to do it in Ubuntu.

I don't think the book is out there anymore. Another great guide that is like this are the Evi Nemth authored "System Administration Handbooks". Thick thick books, written in a thoughtful order.
 
Old 03-04-2014, 12:56 PM   #9
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http://www.amazon.com/Essential-Syst...l+system+admin
 
  


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