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Old 02-11-2013, 04:20 AM   #1
outofbrain
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Am new to linux


Wanted to use open Suse.. can any1 help me out..

thanks in advance.
 
Old 02-11-2013, 04:24 AM   #2
RaviTezu
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has everything you want.
 
Old 02-11-2013, 04:25 AM   #3
EDDY1
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What have you done so far?
Have you downloaded & burned iso?
Does your system boot from usb?
 
Old 02-11-2013, 04:43 AM   #4
outofbrain
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I have the dvd only.. not install yet..
 
Old 02-11-2013, 04:54 AM   #5
thelinuxist
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Well... Insert the DVD into your DVD-drive and reboot. Usually, if I remember it right, you can use it as a so-called "Live Distro" - You don't need to install it. That's good for beginners (I learned it that way, too), because no matter what you do, if you screw up something, you can just reboot and you have a "good as new" linux environment.
The downside of a live distro is that it is much slower than a hard drive install and it's quite difficult to save your data. But for that, you can use pendrivelinux.com's Live Stick installer, which allows you to install a linux image to a usb stick...
IMHO, this solution is better for beginners than installing to hard disk, as I said, if something is wrong, you don't put your computer/data at risk...

I can remember, when I was a beginner (~ 5 years from now), I wanted to install Ubuntu to hdd, but I done wrong with partitioning and... well, let's say, my hdd was Ubuntu only. (Wasn't the worst thing that could have happened to me - Still better than Win2k IMHO).

Anyway, always remember the "Tux's Creed":
1. Don't work as root. Just. Don't. Do. It.
2. Think before you press [Enter]. There is no "Do you really want to *?". You send the command = you want.
3. Experiment. Try stuff out. You don't learn by reading - you learn by doing things.

And most importantly: Have fun and happy linuxing. I hope my post didn't scare you off - Linux is great, if you go to it the right way.
 
Old 02-11-2013, 05:01 AM   #6
outofbrain
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i already have win xp on my pc..
can i install it on the same partition or should i create a new 1..
 
Old 02-11-2013, 05:17 AM   #7
EDDY1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by outofbrain View Post
i already have win xp on my pc..
can i install it on the same partition or should i create a new 1..
It depends on how much big your hdd is & how many primary partitions you have.
You would install to its own partition.
 
Old 02-11-2013, 12:27 PM   #8
DavidMcCann
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Ravi's reference really will tell you everything. Look here:
http://en.opensuse.org/SDB:DVD_installation_for_11.4
and it shows you the stages of installing.

Before you start, think about your partitions. You can shrink your Windows installation (defrag first) to make room for Linux. The best scheme is
1. Windows
2. Linux: the "root partition" (labeled /) that has your software. 10GB should do, or 15GB if you have a big disk and aim to use a lot of programs.
3. Home: the partition (labeled /home) where you keep your files. A separate partition means you can re-install a new version of Linux and keep your files safe.
4. Swap: used if the computer runs out of memory or to hibernate. If you want to hibernate, make it a bit bigger than your memory; if you don't, double the memory but not more than 1GB.
 
Old 02-12-2013, 02:42 AM   #9
kooru
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In addition to what said from other users, i suggest this link to learn more on linux.
 
  


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