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Old 10-19-2019, 05:23 PM   #1
toddly
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After purging lightdm and installing lxdm, cinnamon disappeared, major controls gone


Please Note: My previous three threads have either been closed as being resolved, or were erroneously shut down as being duplicates. None of my past threads are duplicates, although as new issues pop up that are unrelated to the original post, I have closed those threads and attempted to start new threads. So far my efforts have been stymied by people who think I have no business looking for solutions to my Linux issues. Perhaps they are absolutely correct, and I am in way over my head. But I at least would like to be allowed to give it a shot.

So anyway, after my light display manager died (an earlier thread), I tried numerous fixes; ultimately purging lightdm, removing leftovers (autoremove), then installing a different dm (lxdm).

(This was all dealt with in a previous thread: https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...33#post6048233 ) Because the new dm basically resolved the matter of the dead lightdm, that thread has been marked as SOLVED, with the new problems created hopefully to be elucidated here.

Initially, after the lightdm purge, autoremove, and lxdm installation, the computer didn't work because cinnamon was apparently completely gone, so I had to reinstall cinnamon; then I got my desktop back minus many critical programs. For instance, I cannot gain access to terminal, have no program manager, firefox is missing, and so on.

So it seems I finally resolved one problem but now have several new problems. Do I need to do an update at this point? Do I need to purge then reinstall other things, like xorg, greeters, gnome? As usual, I am clueless about the causes and how to proceed.

NOTE: I am a bonified newbie and do not understand Linux lingo (terminology), and haven't a clue about how Linux works. Any assistance or guidance would be appreciated. And yes, I do realize that a reinstall may be my best option. I'm just not quite ready for that, yet. Thanks.
 
Old 10-19-2019, 08:23 PM   #2
wagscat123
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1) The link to your previous thread didn't work.

2) My guess is that you're running Linux Mint. If that's the case, running "sudo apt-get install mint-meta-cinnamon" should get you all the default packages installed again. Running "sudo apt-get update" first would probably help.
 
Old 10-19-2019, 08:50 PM   #3
scasey
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Only you as the OP can mark threads SOLVED. And marking them solved doesn’t close them...they can still be added to.

Your thread titles, at least, are duplicated. That is very confusing.

And your questions/problem statements are not clear (to me). But here’s what I think I’m seeing:
You had problems with Cinnamon and/or light DM. You uninstalled one or both of them, and now what you have is not what you want.

Right? Then re-install what you want. Maybe?

Less talk about what you think is happening here and moreabout what your problem is would help us help you better.
Tell us exactly what you did, why you did it and what’s wrong now.
 
Old 10-20-2019, 03:41 AM   #4
ondoho
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This is OP's only thread that's still open (from that series at least), for reference.

toddly, you have to hunt down the consequences of that autoremove.
It is confusing for people who want to help you if they don't have all that information.
Or double and triple work for you if you have to explain it all again.
Please, also learn to link correctly.

These closed threads may or may not be duplicates, but it is apparent that you did not add any new information, you are basically just calling "Anybody? Anybody?".

So I suggest you go back to this (and any number of requests for actual information, not paraphrasing), roll up your sleeves and dive into the bowels of your OS.
 
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Old 10-24-2019, 03:58 PM   #5
toddly
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thanks, and need help accessing my log

Okay.
First, thanks all for your input. It seems there's a bit of clarifying that I may need to do. But first things first: The log for the autoremove.

Presently I am unable to access that log. Because I am accessing my laptop via booting from a USB drive, I cannot gain permission. Ideally, there should be at least 3 ways for me to access the log, but I can't do any:
1) If I hit Esc at bootup, I can get to recovery mode, but it does not let me log in
2) If I load my problematic Linux on my laptop, it lets me log in, but it has no way to access the terminal to type the command
3) If I get in thru the USB, I am not asked to log in, and I do not know how to get to the terminal for the laptop from the USB Linux
4) I've read that I should be able to type Ctrl + Alt +F2 or F3 to get a log in screen, but all I get are boot options

So, for now, that is why I have not posted the log.
Previously, when I was advised to purge my dead lightdm, I was told to use autoremove to get rid of any lingering bits. I asked whether it was a safe procedure and was told it was a perfectly safe housekeeping command. I had no idea it would remove cinnamon and so many of my other Linux controls. (I then reinstalled cinnamon.)

As for previous threads, when it seemed I had exhausted all my options, I would choose a course of action and post the results. After doing the autoremove and the installation of a new dm, my old problem of a blank screen was gone, and now I found myself with new problems. So I started a new thread. I felt that the new thread dealt with a new situation, and new information, not the old irrelevant information of an earlier thread.

I did not mean to keep open multiple threads. I could find no way to close the other threads I started, but I assumed that solving the threads would close them.

I apologize for the periodic paraphrasing, but I realize from other threads that some people would skip over my longwinded descriptions and then ask me for a particular bit of info that was actually included within my longwinded description. Thus I decided that if people are not actually going to read my descriptions, it might be more effective for me to paraphrase.

And yes, many of my threads did have duplicate titles. That is because each time I would find a thread having been closed without first being resolved, I would ask for it to be re-opened. When my request was denied, I would relaunch a new thread with the same title, because it was intended as a continuation of the previous, but now closed, thread.

Because it seems that running autoremove after removing lightdm was the likely cause of my current problems, I really need to get access to my history logs. Any advice about how to do that would be greatly appreciated. So far, I have only been able to get a cursor/prompt to type the command in the Recovery Mode, and that mode does not give me permission because it does not ask me to log in.

I hope I have succeeded in providing some useful clarification about previous areas of confusion. Let me know if you still have any questions about the present situation. Now I'm ready to roll up my sleeves and get this thing resolved...

Thanks.

Last edited by toddly; 10-24-2019 at 04:32 PM.
 
Old 10-24-2019, 08:01 PM   #6
rokytnji
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Quote:
NOTE: I am a bonified newbie and do not understand Linux lingo (terminology), and haven't a clue about how Linux works. Any assistance or guidance would be appreciated. And yes, I do realize that a reinstall may be my best option. I'm just not quite ready for that, yet. Thanks.
I see a re-install in your future. You seem lost using live usb to access hard drive.
A re-install is probably the quick fix for you.
Save themes, movies, or just copy /home to a one terra byte external hard drive and grab files from there.

If this link don't help. Oh well. I tried. I know it says Windows. You should not need linux knowledge to transpose .

https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/wind...dows-computer/

https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/1704...buntu-live-cd/

https://www.pcworld.com/article/2147...-distress.html
 
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Old 10-25-2019, 03:32 AM   #7
ondoho
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yep.
Clean slate. Save personal data. Then wipe everything.
Reinstall, make more careful choices in the future.
 
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Old 10-29-2019, 03:57 PM   #8
toddly
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Okay, so it seems unanimous; nobody is interested in helping me to access my history log? And nobody can explain why a supposed 'safe' autoremove would wipe away my cinnamon and most functions? Well, if I could be assured that I could save my firefox sessions, then a clean wipe certainly seems the way to go. Still, there are so many avenues I have not even tried yet. Such as, why not do an update or repair in the recovery mode? It may give me back some of my missing functionality? My computer has been effectively dead since April, so I really don't have a problem with trying other possible fixes first, before opting for the most drastic measure of a reinstall.
 
Old 10-30-2019, 11:01 PM   #9
wagscat123
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1. "nobody is interested in helping me to access my history log" - there are better ways to word that to make people want to help you. I'm a nerd and like talking about Linux things at any opportunity, so I'll keep going.

2. If I were in your situation, after months of squabbling with the package manager, doing a clean slate install is what I most likely would do. It's probably the path of least resistance. An installation isn't always worth salvaging. You won't have to do anything below if you keep your /home partition and home directory intact:

You can in fact save your Firefox sessions, since you have command line access, if you go under your regular user's home directory "~/.mozilla/firefox/", you will find a directory with a random alphanumeric name. If you copy this (beware there will be a bunch of little files here that will make copying to flash storage rather slow).

Once you've reinstalled your OS, run "firefox -P" and select "Create New Profile". Then select your the folder you copied earlier to get your profile back.

If you want to be less fancy, just copy the whole .mozilla directory and put it in your new home directory before your run anything from Mozilla the first time.

Last edited by wagscat123; 10-30-2019 at 11:51 PM.
 
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Old 10-31-2019, 10:08 AM   #10
JeremyBoden
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As I recall, you didn't use a safe autoremove.

Didn't you remove a package which said it would cause the removal of piles of stuff (including Cinnamon) - if you proceeded.
You chose to proceed.

This is a removal preceded by a warning.
Any time you get an option to remove dozens of packages, you should think very carefully.

The machine didn't 'know' that you didn't really want to remove Cinnamon.

You could use a live Mint USB/DVD to look at or alter your history files etc
You just need to mount the appropriate disk partition.
But you already know the cause of your problems.
 
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Old 10-31-2019, 10:37 AM   #11
hazel
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You need to understand a bit about how the apt system, and package managers in general, work.

Apt takes dependencies very seriously. It keeps a separate dependency database to ensure that all the packages on your machine are mutually consistent. That can be very useful. It means, for example, that when you remove a package, other packages dependent on it are not left hanging. But this is a complex system and complex systems can be fragile. Apt is like the little girl in the nursery rhyme: when it's good, it's very very good but when it's bad, it's horrid.

One feature of all Debian-based distros, including Mint, is the "metapackage". A metapackage exploits the dependency system to ensure that all the bits and pieces of a complex system such as a desktop get installed together. The name of the desktop (e.g. cinnamon) represents a completely empty package that comes with a lot of dependencies. These include the desktop applications, the display manager (e.g. lxdm) and any necessary libraries. When you install the desktop, all these other packages are installed along with it.

Now what happens if you remove one of those dependencies, for example the display manager? This means that the dependency requirements of the desktop are no longer met, so it gets removed too. That in itself might cause no trouble because the desktop is an empty package. But it means that all the packages that came with it as dependencies are now "orphans". None of them were installed explicitly; they just came along with the desktop. And when you give the autoremove command, all such orphans are removed. That is the situation in which you now find yourself.

You were misled by the source that told you "autoremove" was safe. It is usually safe because normally the only orphan packages around are odd libraries that were once required by some obsolete application. Autoremove is not safe when you have previously done something that caused a metapackage to be removed because that leaves a whole slew of orphans that can disappear instantly.
 
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Old 10-31-2019, 11:39 AM   #12
beachboy2
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Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by rockytnji View Post
I see a re-install in your future.
A brilliant comment!

I don't suppose you are any good with lottery numbers?
 
Old 10-31-2019, 05:58 PM   #13
rtmistler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toddly View Post
Okay, so it seems unanimous; nobody is interested in helping me to access my history log? And nobody can explain why a supposed 'safe' autoremove would wipe away my cinnamon and most functions? Well, if I could be assured that I could save my firefox sessions, then a clean wipe certainly seems the way to go. Still, there are so many avenues I have not even tried yet. Such as, why not do an update or repair in the recovery mode? It may give me back some of my missing functionality? My computer has been effectively dead since April, so I really don't have a problem with trying other possible fixes first, before opting for the most drastic measure of a reinstall.
This all started, I believe with a bunch of updates and then problems following it. Next steps were some forms of attempted recovery, culminating with the attempted purge of lightdm.

Reinstall.

As far as this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by toddly View Post
Okay, so it seems unanimous; nobody is interested in helping me to access my history log? And nobody can explain why a supposed 'safe' autoremove would wipe away my cinnamon and most functions? Well, if I could be assured that I could save my firefox sessions, then a clean wipe certainly seems the way to go.
Did you not review this former reply?
Quote:
Originally Posted by berndbausch View Post
Firefox sessions are stored in your profile. This webpage provides details. Though it has a bit of a Windows focus, you should be able to do the same on Mint.
You've said you're very much a newbie.

I see you doing things like Timeshift and autopurge, etc.

In spite of my many years of Linux experience, I'm not a crazy updater/installer person. I'll do a fresh install, customize it where I want, and then I leave it, literally for a very long time the way it is. I do accept updates, but I also read what's going on and I don't just do a blanket update all, I choose the security ones, the ones I review and deem necessary.

Anyways, recommend you back things up, and re-install.
(1) you can back up things without being specific by booting from a live media and using clone software, or the dd command to grab a disk or partition image
(2) you can back up things specifically, by doing things suggested like in bernbausch's post

Above all, recommend you find a way to establish a stable point, and tread lightly if you propose to change it, for instance ask your questions before you do changes.

A fresh install, works. In fact, do that, do the updates right after it is freshly installed, so you have all the latest live stuff, and then start installing extra stuff you want. But do so cautiously. Then you can get to a final stable point. Recommend you back that up, or do several backups along the way, and then continue being cautious with making system changes.

You're saying you're a Newbie, we get that, well most recommendations are to enhance your capability to, get to, and establish stable install points, and lower your risk as you try to make changes. If I read that you've done some very lengthy list of autoremove, purge, etc, etc. Well, I roll my eyes and give up because you've sort of been advised from several persons, forget the fact that documentation says this a lot too.

Not laughing, not trying to demean, agreeing that it gets frustrating.

If you teach your kid to drive and the first thing they do is press both pedals to the floor and start swinging the wheel around left/right fully, without stopping, you're sitting there going, "stop, stop, Stop, STop, STOP!!!!!" Because it's dangerous, it's wrong, it's not how to drive. And you try to fix their understanding of the topic. Same thing here, for me, I hear/see someone installing, purging, auto-removing, moving fast, faster, FASter, FASTER!, I start chanting stop, stop, stop! But I can't recover when someone taps and clicks a ton, causes a system to virtually implode, and then they hand it to me saying, "fix it!", sometimes you can't.

I get it, you're not doing exactly that, but please do understand that this really should be a time for caution, but actually it will be once you have a reset, and stable point.
 
Old 11-01-2019, 03:06 AM   #14
ondoho
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We're going in circles now, repeating suggestions.
Much has been said, OP reacted (as in providing actual output) to almost none of it.
 
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Old 11-01-2019, 01:04 PM   #15
rtmistler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ondoho View Post
We're going in circles now, repeating suggestions.
Much has been said, OP reacted (as in providing actual output) to almost none of it.
Fair, but to a degree. Let us please all remember that new member toddly has been with LQ since April of this year. They clearly have a problem situation. They are learning, they are also participating. Maybe not as effectively as people may wish, but we do need to account for differently paced learning curves, and sometimes cultural and language barriers (those latter ones do not seem to be any problem here at all). While I realize that repeating advice may be frustrating, we all have seen numerous threads where an OP asks a question, the OP sometimes never returns, and many members offer continued replies citing help, even to the points of dwelling off topic, or even modifying the OPs problem by way of assumptions. Toddly is participating, if their responses are repeated or inadequate, and not helping things to move forwards, then we tell them specifically, but politely. Analysis that this is going no where is, once again, a valid point, and if your continued point is that you have no further advice under the current status, then my recommendation would be to make that clear by way of saying, "Sorry, but there's little I/we can help you with here due to ...".
 
  


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