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Old 08-20-2015, 04:23 PM   #16
Drakeo
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You want to learn Linux then use Slackware.
 
Old 08-20-2015, 04:37 PM   #17
JaseP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drakeo View Post
You want to learn Linux then use Slackware.
Spoken like a true Slackware enthusiast!!!

Seriously, though,... Slack is great, but the learning curve is unusually high (even for Linux). He's better off dipping his toes in the pool first, before jumping in the pool (in the middle of Winter).
 
Old 08-20-2015, 04:50 PM   #18
thetexan
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Thank you so much.

So my next question is this...

1. Is runing CentOS in a virtual machine maybe a good solution to dual booting. Keep in mind one of my projects is to set up XP under virtual machine. So I guess I could do both XP and CentOS. How much free disk space on the partition should I plan on beyond that taken up by Windows 7 so as to include XP and CentOS plus extra for growing?

I need about 40 g for Windows 7 and programs now. How much more for VirtualBox (or similar), XP, and CentOS?

tex
 
Old 08-20-2015, 04:54 PM   #19
rtmistler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thetexan View Post
Thank you so much.

So my next question is this...

1. Is runing CentOS in a virtual machine maybe a good solution to dual booting. Keep in mind one of my projects is to set up XP under virtual machine. So I guess I could do both XP and CentOS. How much free disk space on the partition should I plan on beyond that taken up by Windows 7 so as to include XP and CentOS plus extra for growing?

I need about 40 g for Windows 7 and programs now. How much more for VirtualBox (or similar), XP, and CentOS?

tex
I usually use 8 Gig for most Linux VM disks and I see zero reason why it would be any different for CentOS.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaseP View Post
Spoken like a true Slackware enthusiast!!!

Seriously, though,... Slack is great, but the learning curve is unusually high (even for Linux). He's better off dipping his toes in the pool first, before jumping in the pool (in the middle of Winter).
Laughing. Yeah, I thought that too, both the first part and the second part.
 
Old 08-20-2015, 04:57 PM   #20
suicidaleggroll
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drakeo View Post
You want to learn Linux then use Slackware.
Using slackware will teach you slackware...it will teach you nothing about configuring or administering a typical modern Linux distro.
 
Old 08-20-2015, 05:02 PM   #21
JaseP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thetexan View Post
Thank you so much.

So my next question is this...

1. Is runing CentOS in a virtual machine maybe a good solution to dual booting. Keep in mind one of my projects is to set up XP under virtual machine. So I guess I could do both XP and CentOS. How much free disk space on the partition should I plan on beyond that taken up by Windows 7 so as to include XP and CentOS plus extra for growing?
Answ: Yes. Make sure you are running a 64-bit version of XP, though... No??? If not, make sure your CentOS (or Scientific Linux) distro matches the architecture (32 bit) of the host OS (regardless of the architecture of the processor)...

Quote:
I need about 40 g for Windows 7 and programs now. How much more for VirtualBox (or similar), XP, and CentOS?

tex
rtmistler's suggestion of 8GB should be ok for a relatively minimal install...
 
Old 08-20-2015, 05:29 PM   #22
wagscat123
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Quote:
Make sure you are running a 64-bit version of XP, though... No???
You can virtualize 32-bit OSs under 64-bit OSs.

For XP, and just a simple XP with few utilties, 5 GB would probably be fine, although I'd go little higher than the 5 GB and 8GB minimums just in case to save you the hassle of expanding a virtual machine
 
Old 08-20-2015, 05:54 PM   #23
John VV
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also keep in mind
the NON free RHEL7.1
or the FREE clone of the redhat code
CentOS 7.1
or
Scientific Linux 7.1

is not a great choice for a HOME desktop install

i use scientificlinux all the time for the software that NEEDS to run on redhat

BUT I DO NOT !!! use SL6 as my DEFAULT operating system


for everyday use i run OpenSUSE 13
there is a Long Term Support version
OpenSUSE 13.1

or a SHORT term support
OpenSUSE 13.2 ( soon to be 13.3 )


RedHat is VERY!!!! conservative !!! in the version of software they use

it is VERY VERY VERY VERY WELL !!! tested
and as such is OLDER and the major versions will NEVER!!! change in the lifetime of the rhel series

the version in 6.0 will STILL be the same in 6.11 5 years from now

or
the MAJOR versions of programs in rhel7 will STILL be the SANE major version 9 years from now when it gose End of Life


redhat / cent /sl software is ROCK STABLE!!!!
there really are NO bugs to cause a crash

in the last 10 years i have only had cent crash ONE time and ONLY ONE TIME
and I !! my self CAUSED IT!! - yes i caused the crash and not the software

but the trade off for that is the software is older and NOT the newest
 
Old 08-20-2015, 06:53 PM   #24
JaseP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wagscat123 View Post
You can virtualize 32-bit OSs under 64-bit OSs.
But not the other way around...
 
Old 08-20-2015, 09:22 PM   #25
wagscat123
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Yes indeed JaseP.

Texan, something you're probably learning about Linux very quickly is that in the Linux world, it's all about freedom and choice. There's tons of options to achieve something. Many do things their own way, and it is good and normal you're getting many different recommendations. They're choices, as in the Linux world, you choose your UI, package management, and community.

Last edited by wagscat123; 08-20-2015 at 09:23 PM.
 
Old 08-21-2015, 03:27 AM   #26
fido_dogstoyevsky
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drakeo View Post
You want to learn Linux then use Slackware.
Quote:
Originally Posted by suicidaleggroll View Post
Using slackware will teach you slackware...it will teach you nothing about configuring or administering a typical modern Linux distro.
In this regard, Slackware is no different to OpenSuse, Fedora, Ubuntu and many others. Every distribution has its own idiosyncrasies and learning just one distribution will only teach you how to be comfortable with one distribution. None is any "harder" than any of the others (some do more hand holding than others so that they seem "easier"), every one is only a little different. If you want to learn "Linux" try all the flavours - it only costs some of your time to install several distributions on your computer.

And the important thing is to actually USE Linux as part of your daily computer use. You should only rely on Windows as a backup for when there is an urgent job to be done and you don't yet know how to do it using your Linux installation.

PS ignore the icons, I'm using Slackware but I forgot to turn Secret Agent off and it's making me look like a Windows user.

Last edited by fido_dogstoyevsky; 08-21-2015 at 03:34 AM.
 
Old 08-21-2015, 08:37 AM   #27
Ihatewindows522
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thetexan View Post
Thank you so much.

So my next question is this...

1. Is runing CentOS in a virtual machine maybe a good solution to dual booting. Keep in mind one of my projects is to set up XP under virtual machine. So I guess I could do both XP and CentOS. How much free disk space on the partition should I plan on beyond that taken up by Windows 7 so as to include XP and CentOS plus extra for growing?

I need about 40 g for Windows 7 and programs now. How much more for VirtualBox (or similar), XP, and CentOS?

tex
From first-hand experience:
A VM is not the ideal solution unless you plan on using more than one distro at a time. It's ironic that Linux distros play nicer with Windows on a given computer than with Linux or any other dialect of UNIX. (Linux distros conflict when it comes to the bootloader, for some strange reason one won't recognize the other's kernel updates)

I would not give Windows 7 40GB...I couldn't keep Vista on 80GB for over a year. It's due to a little misfeature called SXS, which I'm sure you know about. It slowly eats up your hard drive. (C:\Windows\winsxs) I would go no less than 160GB for Windows 7, and 80GB for XP.

Linux, however, doesn't need a lot of space. It can comfortably run on 8GB, provided you won't be installing much software. You're probably going to want to give it around 40GB, though, just to have room for your home folder and some extra applications.

For best performance, use the ext4 filesystem. Just know that Windows can't read that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fido_dogstoyevsky View Post
In this regard, Slackware is no different to OpenSuse, Fedora, Ubuntu and many others. Every distribution has its own idiosyncrasies and learning just one distribution will only teach you how to be comfortable with one distribution. None is any "harder" than any of the others (some do more hand holding than others so that they seem "easier"), every one is only a little different. If you want to learn "Linux" try all the flavours - it only costs some of your time to install several distributions on your computer.

And the important thing is to actually USE Linux as part of your daily computer use. You should only rely on Windows as a backup for when there is an urgent job to be done and you don't yet know how to do it using your Linux installation.

PS ignore the icons, I'm using Slackware but I forgot to turn Secret Agent off and it's making me look like a Windows user.
You haven't used Gentoo, have you? Not exactly "user friendly" if you ask me. These are all very different and are made for different purposes. Slackware is made for the enthusiast, OpenSUSE is made for easy configuration and tweaking, Fedora and Ubuntu both are made for a fast, workable desktop.

I do agree, though, try everything...after you find out what your company is using. You don't want to waste your time learning how to use Landscape and Juju when you'll actually need to know the JBoss middleware and Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization...or vice versa.
 
Old 08-21-2015, 08:44 AM   #28
rtmistler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ihatewindows522 View Post
I would not give Windows 7 40GB...I couldn't keep Vista on 80GB for over a year. It's due to a little misfeature called SXS, which I'm sure you know about. It slowly eats up your hard drive. (C:\Windows\winsxs) I would go no less than 160GB for Windows 7, and 80GB for XP.
That squishy, pumpkin exploding sound really was my head exploding, at this amazing, but obviously not unexpected, fact about Windows. This is why there are probably at least 521 other "ihatewindows" logons and I'm envisioning that poor 522 had to try and retry registering their username until they found a free number, because so very many people liked the name "ihatewindows".

Last edited by rtmistler; 08-25-2015 at 07:37 AM.
 
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