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Old 05-03-2006, 07:00 PM   #1
adrian_mx
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Registered: Oct 2005
Location: Cancún, Mexico
Distribution: Arch Linux 0.7.1
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About Slackware


I have tried some distributions, but always returned to Debian, (currently i'm testing Arch), and I have heard a lot about slackware stability, speed, etc.
So can anyone give me some information?
Also have these questions about Slack
1.- Does it comes with a 2.6 kernel?, because the 2.4 kernel doesn't work fine with SCSI discs, or at least in my case.
2.- Is it binary based or source based?
3.- What package management system uses, and it is good? Does it resolves dependencies and has a very complete software repository?
4.- Does it have a large community which could support me if needed?
5.- Does it have graphic tools, cool panels, or is it text-file based?
(I prefer text-file)
6.- Do you recommend it?
 
Old 05-03-2006, 08:19 PM   #2
ataraxia
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Registered: Apr 2006
Location: Pittsburgh
Distribution: Debian Sid AMD64
Posts: 296

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Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian_mx
I have tried some distributions, but always returned to Debian, (currently i'm testing Arch), and I have heard a lot about slackware stability, speed, etc.
So can anyone give me some information?
Also have these questions about Slack
1.- Does it comes with a 2.6 kernel?, because the 2.4 kernel doesn't work fine with SCSI discs, or at least in my case.
You get your choice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian_mx
2.- Is it binary based or source based?
Binary.
Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian_mx
3.- What package management system uses, and it is good? Does it resolves dependencies and has a very complete software repository?
It has its own package system, based on plain tgz files. It does not resolve dependencies, nor does it provide a large repository - mostly, it's just what's on the CDs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian_mx
4.- Does it have a large community which could support me if needed?
This site has the most Slack users I've ever seen.
Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian_mx
5.- Does it have graphic tools, cool panels, or is it text-file based?
(I prefer text-file)
It's the granddaddy of all text-file-based distros.
Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian_mx
6.- Do you recommend it?
Not really. It's awesome if you want to do everything yourself, and just want an installer to take care of the annoying base install for you. Otherwise, stick with Debian.

I have also tried many distros, and always gone back to Debian. Slack is one of the better ones out there, but it's not my style.
 
Old 05-03-2006, 08:49 PM   #3
drkstr
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Registered: Feb 2006
Location: Seattle, WA: USA
Distribution: Slackware 11.0
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I would like to post my own opinion to these questions since I use Slackware on a daily basis.

Quote:
Does it comes with a 2.6 kernel?, because the 2.4 kernel doesn't work fine with SCSI discs, or at least in my case.
For stability reasons, the default kernel is 2.4.x but it does come with the source to the 2.6.x kernel if you choose to install it. (frankly I just downloaded the latest 2.6.x version from kernel.org anyways.)

Quote:
Is it binary based or source based?
Source based! Slackware is a pure linux distro and uses the pure unmodified source to the official linux packages. I can see how some people might think it is binary based as it uses a package manegement system of sorts. All this is really for is the easy removal of source compailed packages. A Slacware package is the result of 'make install DESTDIR=<location>/builds/<program>/' Instead of installing all of the binaries to the / drive it puts it in a sub folder. You would then issue the command 'makepkg' and it zips it all up for you. All the package manager does is take the files in the .tgz file and installs them to the / drive. In fact, if you download the full slackware, it comes with all of the packages source as well as the package.

Quote:
What package management system uses, and it is good? Does it resolves dependencies and has a very complete software repository?
I love the package management system and think it is one of the best. I prefere to compile my own source as it allows for a greater number of software available and gives me more control over the system. The downside to compiling is it is hard to remove the install if you no longer want it or need to update. The Slack package manager easily allows you to build your own packages thus removeing this problem.

Quote:
Does it have a large community which could support me if needed?
My opinion is biased, but i have heard from other people/reviews that it is one of the best. FYI: the official slackware forum is on LQ

Quote:
Does it have graphic tools, cool panels, or is it text-file based?
As I mentioned before, Slackware is a pure Linux distro, you will learn the nuts and bolts of linux when using Slackware.

Quote:
Do you recommend it?
For me, a life without Slack is a life not worth living


To any users of other distros out there, please do not get offended by my response. This is just my opinion about what works best for me. I am not claiming that Slackware is superior to other distros in any way.

regards,
...drkstr

Last edited by drkstr; 05-03-2006 at 08:55 PM.
 
Old 05-04-2006, 12:06 AM   #4
zytsef
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Registered: Apr 2006
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Distribution: Slackware, Ubuntu
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I also use Slackware on a daily basis, and for a quick, clean, and fast system I personally believe nothing is better. The installer is very simple (especially if you use cfdisk to set up partitions), and completely ncurses based. The only complaint that I have is there is no cancel or back option when in the middle of the initial configuration. Not a big deal but has occationally led to wasted time when I screw something up. Hope you enjoy.
 
Old 05-04-2006, 06:25 AM   #5
Nylex
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Distribution: Slackware
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For information, Slackware will be shipping with a 2.6 kernel as the default as of version 11.0 (which should be out sometime soon ).
 
Old 05-04-2006, 06:42 AM   #6
ioerror
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I used to use Suse, and I've tried Fedora, Mandrake, Debian etc, but now I wouldn't use anything except Slack. It leaves me alone and lets me configure my system the way I want, without bloated tools like Yast getting in my face.

Quote:
Originally Posted by drkstr
(frankly I just downloaded the latest 2.6.x version from kernel.org anyways.)
Yeah, one of the things I like about slack is that Pat doesn't patch the bejeesus out of the kernel (or indeed anything else).

Regarding package dependencies, some enterprising Slack-ers have written slapt-get and swaret, which can ease installing/upgrading packages. I haven't used these myself yet so I can't comment on them, as I prefer to compile from source and build a package with checkinstall or makepkg, as drkstr explained above. For me, the package management is one of the best things about Slackware.

Quote:
The only complaint that I have is there is no cancel or back option when in the middle of the initial configuration.
This is one of the most irritating things about Slackware, you can't even see how much space the selected packages will take up, which is a pain when you have limited drive space. Another thing I'm not too keen on this that some configuration values are hard-coded into the rc scripts (e.g. mouse parameters in rc.gpm). I'd really like a BSD style /etc/rc.conf so everything is in one place. But these are minor issues, in use it's the spiffiest distro around.

Last edited by ioerror; 05-04-2006 at 06:47 AM.
 
Old 05-04-2006, 03:33 PM   #7
IceChant
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Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Israel
Distribution: Windows Xp, Slackware
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I tried many distro's before I came to Slackware and now I use it as primary OS, really like it but it isn't for anyone you better try it yourself or you'll never know.
 
Old 05-04-2006, 04:40 PM   #8
Michael_aust
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Location: Lancashire (United Kingdom)
Distribution: Debian Etch, on 686 machine.
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you can use slapt-get to do some dependency resolving cant you if you use repoistories set up for slapt-get.

My opinion would be before going to a full slack system give vector linux a go as thats based off of slackware 10.1 so anything packages for that will work in it. linuxpackages.net has slackware binaries as well.
 
Old 05-04-2006, 04:47 PM   #9
Ahmed
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Registered: May 2005
Location: München, Germany
Distribution: Slackware, Arch
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian_mx
3.- What package management system uses, and it is good? Does it resolves dependencies and has a very complete software repository?
There are very good 3rd party package managers that resolve dependencies. One of them is called slapt-get (surprise surprise) and has a graphical frontend called gslapt. There's also pkgtool which is good for installing and removing packages rather than downloading them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian_mx
4.- Does it have a large community which could support me if needed?
Hell yes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian_mx
5.- Does it have graphic tools, cool panels, or is it text-file based?
The 2 Slackware 10.2 CDs provide surprisingly many GUIs: KDE, Xfce, Fluxbox, Blackbox, Windowmaker, IceWM, TWM, and a couple of others. There's no official Gnome build, but there are 2 3rd party builds that are very nice (Dropline and Freerock Gnome). I am currently using a very nice and customized Gnome desktop for Slackware. But yet I always tend to edit text files rather than use the available GUI tools.
But I have good news for you: Once you install Slackware you boot into Runlevel 3 rather than 4 (In Slackware, 4 is for X..), so you can use it as a CLI straight away.

Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian_mx
6.- Do you recommend it?
By all means, yes

-A

Last edited by Ahmed; 05-04-2006 at 04:49 PM.
 
Old 05-04-2006, 08:05 PM   #10
Tinkster
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Distribution: slackware by choice, others too :} ... android.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adrian_mx
6.- Do you recommend it?
Not without knowing what you expect of it, and not without a word
of warning, and brief explanation why *I* love Slack...

If you want your hand held, and are bothered by source: forget it.
Slack comes with a sufficient but quite basic base of programs on
2 CDs. If you need more that that source is your friend. There are
other packages out there (e.g. on http://linuxpackages.net ), but
if you're a control freak you won't use those ;} ...

Control (TOTAL control) of your system is the primary reason
that I love slack. Apart from the sensible (secure and very
minimalistic) defaults that Pat sets, you're in charge from day 1.

And slacks simplicity; its init-script style for instance. where
my colleagues SuSE has about 580K of init scripts, my slack-box
has only 190K. They're plain, easy to read and modify.


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 05-05-2006, 07:50 AM   #11
BinJajer
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Registered: Sep 2005
Location: Warsaw, Poland
Distribution: Slackware 10.2, Caldera OpenLinux 3.1, Corel Linux (Thanks xhi!), Debian GNU/HURD etc...
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Rep: Reputation: 30
Slack is a real whatever-you-want distro. It's fast, stable and comes w. 2.4 kernel by default. It also has a binary package system and of course slapt-get, which is an equivalent to apt-get. On the 10.1 cd's you also have a 2.6 kernel. You can compile your onw programs and the package it to .tgz. I _STRONGLY_ recommend it.
 
  


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