LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 05-11-2009, 11:04 PM   #16
mmmichael
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Location: USA
Distribution: Ubuntu,Puppy,Zenwalk,FreeBSD
Posts: 9

Rep: Reputation: 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by cynicalpsycho View Post
This is exactly the direction I'd like to head in, Do you have any personal experience with LFS?
I have a working system that I built with LFS and BLFS. I found it educational and VERY time consuming. It will teach you about compiling from source, file system basics, applying patches, dealing with dependencies and more. There are easier ways to learn these things, but LFS pounds it into your head. The time it takes to compile programs and their dependencies and their dependencies' dependencies forces you to consider carefully what you want to install and why.
A major shortcoming of LFS is in the area of package management. If you want to learn Linux you ought to try different distros and see how they install and upgrade software. It would be instructive to compare, for example, Gentoo, Fedora, Debian, and (stepping out of the box here) FreeBSD.
LFS is a good learning tool, but is not for everyone, and does not replace the experience of using a production quality distro.
 
Old 05-12-2009, 11:34 AM   #17
cynicalpsycho
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: America
Distribution: Debian/Arch
Posts: 134

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmmichael View Post
I have a working system that I built with LFS and BLFS. I found it educational and VERY time consuming. It will teach you about compiling from source, file system basics, applying patches, dealing with dependencies and more. There are easier ways to learn these things, but LFS pounds it into your head. The time it takes to compile programs and their dependencies and their dependencies' dependencies forces you to consider carefully what you want to install and why.
A major shortcoming of LFS is in the area of package management. If you want to learn Linux you ought to try different distros and see how they install and upgrade software. It would be instructive to compare, for example, Gentoo, Fedora, Debian, and (stepping out of the box here) FreeBSD.
LFS is a good learning tool, but is not for everyone, and does not replace the experience of using a production quality distro.
so what would be your advice to someone who is trying to master a linux OS? where should they start and what should I be doing now to improve my understanding of linux? any particular reads that you would recommend?
 
Old 05-12-2009, 01:53 PM   #18
H_TeXMeX_H
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: $RANDOM
Distribution: slackware64
Posts: 12,928
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 1288Reputation: 1288Reputation: 1288Reputation: 1288Reputation: 1288Reputation: 1288Reputation: 1288Reputation: 1288Reputation: 1288
I would definitely recommend RUTE to anyone trying to figure out Linux:
http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz

Now if you wanted to learn more bash scripting you can try:
http://tldp.org/LDP/Bash-Beginners-Guide/html/
http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/
http://www.grymoire.com/Unix/

For the rest, just check the documentation and you should be able to figure it out. If not, search google or post here.

Also check the slackware suggestions link in my sig, it includes many good sites most are not slackware-specific.
 
Old 05-12-2009, 03:50 PM   #19
ECRocker
Member
 
Registered: May 2007
Distribution: RHEL 5, Ubuntu 9.10, Fedora 12
Posts: 85

Rep: Reputation: 17
@TexMex: Wow, Rute is a really good read! I wish I had this years ago!!
Thanks
 
Old 05-12-2009, 08:15 PM   #20
soleilarw
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2009
Posts: 107

Rep: Reputation: 19
Just a footnote: it's quite a stretch that LFS will teach C programming. It is certainly handy, but not really what LFS is about. Based on my own experience with LFS I would rather argue that LFS should be approached with some level of scripting skills. BASH scripting would be a good choice if learning Linux/UNIX is the goal, but even PHP scripts or other scripting languages used on the command-line will work. Anyway, using compiled applications to tweak LFS seems overkill to me.

Linux Archive

Last edited by soleilarw; 06-18-2009 at 04:46 AM.
 
Old 05-12-2009, 11:52 PM   #21
mmmichael
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Location: USA
Distribution: Ubuntu,Puppy,Zenwalk,FreeBSD
Posts: 9

Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynicalpsycho View Post
so what would be your advice to someone who is trying to master a linux OS? where should they start and what should I be doing now to improve my understanding of linux? any particular reads that you would recommend?
I second the recommendation to read RUTE. It's an excellent beginner-to-advanced tutorial.
My own advice, for what it's worth, is to install and configure several distros on different hardware. (The wonderful thing about Microsoft is that they have left so many people with pcs that are thought to be obsolete or broken. You'd be surprised how easy it is to find machines that can run Linux quite well for little or no money.) Give yourself some projects, like setting up dual boots on your friends' pcs, setting up a home network with file and print sharing, using an old pc as an ip router, etc. Finding out what you don't know how to do is the beginning of learning. This will teach you what to look for in Gentoo docs, LQ forum, Ubuntu forum, google, man pages, etc, etc. Read other people's forum posts and see if you can research their problems. It also can't hurt to learn bash and/or perl scripting and get an acquaintance with C, as these are ubiquitous in Linux.
 
Old 05-13-2009, 12:21 AM   #22
chrism01
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Location: Sydney
Distribution: Centos 6.9, Centos 7.3
Posts: 17,411

Rep: Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397
Here's a link to online books that cover just about everything Linux: http://www.linuxtopia.org/index.html
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LXer: New online class teaches basic Linux for free LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 11-22-2006 07:21 AM
LXer: Hardware/software kit teaches embedded Linux LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 08-19-2006 12:03 PM
Windows screensaver that teaches linux akudewan General 6 01-21-2006 06:18 PM
LXer: Obsidian teaches open source basics LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 01-10-2006 06:31 AM
LXer: Teen teaches Google to share LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 12-12-2005 02:31 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:39 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration