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Old 12-10-2012, 01:37 PM   #1
prasunjit
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Registered: Dec 2012
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* expansion


Hello

i have two text files in the current directory: lserror.txt lsouput1.txt

while executing the below command to find files without double quotes as "*.txt" it is throwing error
find . -type f -name *.txt
But the below command without double quotes as "*.txt" is giving correct result
ls *.txt

pls explain
 
Old 12-10-2012, 01:43 PM   #2
colucix
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You have to pass a literal asterisk to the find command, otherwise the shell expansion brings to a wrong command line. Since the .txt files are in the current working directory, the shell substitutes their name in the command line, givin'
Code:
find . -type f -name lserror.txt lsouput1.txt
which is wrong. On the other hand, two (or more) arguments are accepted by the ls command, so that the shell substitution
Code:
ls lserror.txt lsouput1.txt
bring to a correct command line. To pass a literal * to find, either escape it or use single or double quotes:
Code:
find . -type f -name \*.txt
find . -type f -name '*.txt'
find . -type f -name "*.txt"
All the lines above are equivalent.
 
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Old 12-11-2012, 11:55 PM   #3
prasunjit
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Smile

@colucix..thnks for the stuff..
But it seems all the below commands are going to recursion giving text files within sub directories as well...

f u can help

Quote:
Originally Posted by colucix View Post
You have to pass a literal asterisk to the find command, otherwise the shell expansion brings to a wrong command line. Since the .txt files are in the current working directory, the shell substitutes their name in the command line, givin'
Code:
find . -type f -name lserror.txt lsouput1.txt
which is wrong. On the other hand, two (or more) arguments are accepted by the ls command, so that the shell substitution
Code:
ls lserror.txt lsouput1.txt
bring to a correct command line. To pass a literal * to find, either escape it or use single or double quotes:
Code:
find . -type f -name \*.txt
find . -type f -name '*.txt'
find . -type f -name "*.txt"
All the lines above are equivalent.

Last edited by prasunjit; 12-12-2012 at 12:12 AM.
 
Old 12-12-2012, 12:30 AM   #4
colucix
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Registered: Sep 2003
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find is recursive by its nature, but you can limit the level of recursion (that is how much it descends into subdirectories) using -maxdepth (and eventually the related -mindepth) expression. In order to limit the search to the current working directory, you can try:
Code:
find . -maxdepth 1 -name \*.txt
Anyway, in this case is more convenient to use
Code:
ls *.txt
unless you want to use some more strict search criteria or apply some action on the results by means of the find command facilities.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-12-2012, 07:10 AM   #5
prasunjit
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Registered: Dec 2012
Posts: 17

Original Poster
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Thanks a lot....this was really helpful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by colucix View Post
find is recursive by its nature, but you can limit the level of recursion (that is how much it descends into subdirectories) using -maxdepth (and eventually the related -mindepth) expression. In order to limit the search to the current working directory, you can try:
Code:
find . -maxdepth 1 -name \*.txt
Anyway, in this case is more convenient to use
Code:
ls *.txt
unless you want to use some more strict search criteria or apply some action on the results by means of the find command facilities.
 
  


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