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Old 08-11-2004, 11:17 PM   #1
FreakboY
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Whats faster Coaxial Cabling or CAT5 Cabling!??


Whats faster Coaxial Cabling or CAT5 Cabling!??
I want to network my home!
 
Old 08-11-2004, 11:30 PM   #2
ppuru
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More of a hardware related issue.

I would go with Cat-5. Coax has problems like a cablefault around one T-connector, be it a BNC problem or a faulty T connecter itself can bring your entire network down.
 
Old 08-14-2004, 12:02 PM   #3
FreakboY
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then i'll use CAT6...
whats the difference between stranded and solid!??

Thanks!

Last edited by FreakboY; 08-14-2004 at 12:11 PM.
 
Old 08-14-2004, 08:14 PM   #4
TheTweaker
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you mean Cat-5...and the their are two types. STP and UTP. STP (Sheilded Twisted Pair) has a metal sheild around each pait of wires redsing cross talk of the wires. UTP (Unsheilded Twisted Pair) has no sheilding between the 4 or 2 pairs of wires. UTP is perfectly fine and is the most commonly used. STP is much more expensive and is used around server that carry massive amouts of data or if their are a lot of cables next to each other...just go with UTP. go to best buy or Frys or something and get some... and Cat-5 is faster
 
Old 08-14-2004, 08:31 PM   #5
JCdude2525
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Dalco.com

A good place to buy CAT-5 cables is www.dalco.com, you can get 100 ft. of it for like $24.

-Jim
 
Old 08-14-2004, 10:12 PM   #6
michaelk
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Actually there is a CAT6
CAT5 - 100MB
CAT5e - 200MB
CAT6 - 1000MB
http://compnetworking.about.com/od/cat5cables/
 
Old 08-15-2004, 12:34 PM   #7
FreakboY
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so if I buy CAT6 STP ... and I get a 1Gb Hub/Router i'll get 1 Gb speed!??
will i get a reliable network!??
 
Old 08-15-2004, 11:12 PM   #8
1337 Twinkie
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Don't forget, you also need a 1Gb NIC in each of your PC's, too

Anyways, for a home network, you probably don't need a gig. What I've seen Cat 6 used for is to connect T1's and routers and switches. In the machine room is where you really need to speed. Gigabit to the desktop is not unheard of, though.

As for network reliebility, the network is probably more likely to go down at the router or server.

If you need cable, Lowe's sells Cat 5 by the box. I think it comes 100'+.

-----------------------------------------------------------

PS- If you really want gig, there's always fiber, too.
 
Old 08-15-2004, 11:24 PM   #9
Rydog2987
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buying a cat6 or fiber optic is like buying a 18 wheeler truck for personal use because u need some extra cargo room. Eventhough the capability is there it is unpractible for the very few times ur ever going to actually need a gig per second transfer rate. the only time u would really need it is in a large corporate network.
 
Old 08-16-2004, 12:24 AM   #10
FreakboY
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1337 Twinkie: I won't forget!!... i'm thinking on what NIC's to get!
any suggestion!??

Rydog2987: yes... i want a corporate network...
i need to show my customers how good i'm networking!
;-)


fiber optics...
please tell me more!!
i'll be amazed if you guide me... on this...



Regards,

Last edited by FreakboY; 08-16-2004 at 12:28 AM.
 
Old 08-16-2004, 03:22 PM   #11
mi6
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We use Fiber where I work and I just don't think it would be cost effective to run on a home network. We have to use some extremely long runs that cat 5 is not capable of. If it wasn't for that we wouldn't use it on as much equipment as we do. Cost of setup, training and maintenance of our Fiber runs has been quite high when compared to that of twisted pair networks.

Fiber isn't like RJ-45 connectors that anyone can crimp to a cable. It takes a decent amount of time (and expense) to terminate runs. By all means, if you have the money and are wanting to attract clients that may need it, learn about fiber.
 
Old 08-16-2004, 05:47 PM   #12
chort
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Just to clear a few things up about GigE, simply using a 1000BaseT NIC with Cat-6 and a 1000BaseT switch won't get you gigabit speeds. A normal ethernet frame is only 1518 bytes and it's nearly impossible to send that size frames rapidly enough to fill the bandwidth of a Gigabit interface. You need jumbo-frame support in order to send data in huge frames and all the components involved must support jumbo-frames: The NIC, the OS/NIC drive, and the switch.

There are very few things that could exist in a home environment that could even benefit from GigE support. Conceptually, GigE over copper is no different from 100BaseT, so it won't really demonstrate any abilities to set it up (it sure will cost you a pretty penny though, especially if you use STP cables).

Fiber is much different from Cat-5/6 cables. Cat-5/6 work by sending electrons over copper wires. The desipation of engery is pretty rapid with this method and your signal starts to degrade after about 100 yards, and you'll probably lose the signal anywhere between 125 yards and 200 yards.

The difference with fiber optic networking is that it uses light beams sent over glass tubes. It turns out that the desipation is much, much less and depending on the type of fiber optic run you can get miles and miles of distance. This is why fiber is often used in large offices and data centers (i.e. places where a single cable has to run more than 100 yards). The downside is that most fiber networking cables are inflexible, easily damaged, and they are waaaaaaaaaaay more expensive than copper Cat-5/6. Fiber also has different termination than the copper RJ-45, so you need a different kind of switch port (and NIC, if you're using fiber-based NICs).

For the reasons mentioned above, fiber generally isn't used to connect workstations; it's used to connect switchs and routers.
 
Old 08-16-2004, 05:54 PM   #13
1337 Twinkie
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You really don't need Cat6 or Fiber at home, but if you want to learn more,
These guys sell fiber supplies, as well as all manner of networking stuff.
 
Old 08-17-2004, 02:24 AM   #14
nysethe
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If I had to buy NICs and cables for 2+ PC's right now, I would buy the following:

1. Gigabit NIC's for each PC
2. Cat6 Cabling
3. Either a 10/100 switch (for now) or if you can afford it, a Gigabit switch

Reason:
The cost of a Gigabit NIC right now is not much more than 10/100. You can get a decent gig nic for under 30 bucks. Cat6 is also not that much more expensive than Cat5e, and handles gig better.

To answer your question:
Coaxial is history, wipe it from your memory!

-Erik
 
Old 08-18-2004, 07:12 PM   #15
FreakboY
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nysethe:
thats all i needed to know!!!
 
  


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