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Old 12-24-2014, 08:21 AM   #1
Mitt Green
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Unhappy Some networking problems


Hi everyone,
I have some problems with networking.
1. I can't log in some sites:
duolingo.com - hitting both Enter and clicking Login after filling fields doesn't make the site loading;
justlinux.com - clicking Login makes a browser load but returns no answer;
linuxquestions.org - it's unable to login or post something;
linux.org - unable to post;
facebook.com
unable to login
and so on.
2. I can't view some FTP sites.
PS: I tried everything from above from Windows Phone and Windows - no problems. Net speed is about 3-5MB/s.
PPS: the problem starts when I moved to another house but with the same provider. Can my provider block something?
Thanks for any help.
 
Old 12-24-2014, 10:47 AM   #2
camorri
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I think you need to do some more problem determination. The sites you mention are OK. from here. If you have moved, you now have a different physical connection to the web, through your ISP. The modem/router has been moved, cables replugged etc.

It sounds like your path out from your end is OK, other wise you would not see the sites at all. The return path, your receive looks to be the problem.

If you can find spare cables, try swapping one at a time, and retest. If that finds nothing, have a look at your router configuration. If that's OK, try pinging the sites. For example, 'ping www.facebook.com' ( without the quote marks ) Ishould work without any time outs.

There is an outside chance this is ISP related. Call their support, and see if there are any know problems, and if they can help you out.

If you can not find the problem, post the output of the interface you are using; wired or wireless.
If you need help with the commands, just ask.
 
Old 12-24-2014, 11:10 AM   #3
Mitt Green
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camorri View Post
I think you need to do some more problem determination. The sites you mention are OK. from here. If you have moved, you now have a different physical connection to the web, through your ISP. The modem/router has been moved, cables replugged etc.

It sounds like your path out from your end is OK, other wise you would not see the sites at all. The return path, your receive looks to be the problem.

If you can find spare cables, try swapping one at a time, and retest. If that finds nothing, have a look at your router configuration. If that's OK, try pinging the sites. For example, 'ping www.facebook.com' ( without the quote marks ) Ishould work without any time outs.

There is an outside chance this is ISP related. Call their support, and see if there are any know problems, and if they can help you out.

If you can not find the problem, post the output of the interface you are using; wired or wireless.
If you need help with the commands, just ask.
Thanks. Pinging facebook.com had 15% packet loss (what does it mean?), linuxquestions.org with 20% packet loss, duolingo.com couldn't start, linux.org with no problems.
All websites are ok as I'm writing from the same wireless network and attempt from Windows Phone and Windows were also from this network.
The thing is I have different router, with different cables and there are no snare cables. My provider gives every their user a router and also tv adapter in lease.
So I think the problem is either in the router or with provider which is less likely, even though it is one of the worst providers out there, because these problems started exactly after I moved so I didn't change settings.

Last edited by Mitt Green; 12-24-2014 at 11:20 AM.
 
Old 12-25-2014, 03:26 AM   #4
camorri
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Packet loss is an indication there are network problems. it doesn't help determine where, it just shows you there are problems.

New router. Did you configure it? What type of connection is it to your ISP? cable? phone line?

Can you ping the router from a system that is giving you problems to internet sites?
without packet loss?
 
Old 12-25-2014, 06:55 AM   #5
Mitt Green
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camorri View Post
Packet loss is an indication there are network problems. it doesn't help determine where, it just shows you there are problems.

New router. Did you configure it? What type of connection is it to your ISP? cable? phone line?

Can you ping the router from a system that is giving you problems to internet sites?
without packet loss?
My provider sent somewhat "master" to configure the router. How to ping the router? I've just pinged these sites, only duolingo has 100% packet loss. Interesting is that I tried all these sites from Ubuntu native browser and they worked. On the same machine, with LiveCD.
 
Old 12-25-2014, 08:02 AM   #6
camorri
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www.duolingo.com does not respond to ping's here either. It is possible to turn off ping response in routers, I would guess that is the case with this site. I can get to the site, without problems, so I would just ignore that for the moment.

To ping your router, all that is needed is the IP address of the router, on the side your systems connect to. Most routers for home use are set up using NAT. The IP addresses they hand out are private class C addresses. If you look at your systems address, and it starts with 192.168.xxx.yyy, then the IP for the router is most likely 192.168.xxx.1. So for example, if your systems IP is 192.168.0.100, the IP address for the router would most likely be 192.168.0.1. This is not a rule, just the way most routers are set up. There are linux tools that can scan the lan. I use nmap for this sort of thing. ( the xxx.yyy are variable fields )

To find your IP address, open a command prompt. Run the command /sbin/ifconfig. The output will look something like this:

Quote:
/sbin/ifconfig
eth0: flags=4163<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
inet 192.168.1.26 netmask 255.255.255.0 broadcast 192.168.1.255
inet6 fe80::21d:7dff:fe20:f467 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x20<link>
ether 00:1d:7d:20:f4:67 txqueuelen 1000 (Ethernet)
RX packets 32090 bytes 39679887 (37.8 MiB)
RX errors 0 dropped 0 overruns 0 frame 0
TX packets 17443 bytes 1104414 (1.0 MiB)
TX errors 0 dropped 0 overruns 0 carrier 0 collisions 0

lo: flags=73<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING> mtu 65536
inet 127.0.0.1 netmask 255.0.0.0
inet6 ::1 prefixlen 128 scopeid 0x10<host>
loop txqueuelen 0 (Local Loopback)
RX packets 97 bytes 8356 (8.1 KiB)
RX errors 0 dropped 0 overruns 0 frame 0
TX packets 97 bytes 8356 (8.1 KiB)
TX errors 0 dropped 0 overruns 0 carrier 0 collisions 0
The field inet is the IPv4 address field and inet6 is the IPv6 address field. The name of the interface is the name on the first line, on the left. The above is my system, since your system is wireless, the name will be different, probably something like wlan0.

Give it a try and see if you can ping your router.
 
Old 12-25-2014, 08:23 AM   #7
Mitt Green
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camorri View Post
www.duolingo.com does not respond to ping's here either. It is possible to turn off ping response in routers, I would guess that is the case with this site. I can get to the site, without problems, so I would just ignore that for the moment.

To ping your router, all that is needed is the IP address of the router, on the side your systems connect to. Most routers for home use are set up using NAT. The IP addresses they hand out are private class C addresses. If you look at your systems address, and it starts with 192.168.xxx.yyy, then the IP for the router is most likely 192.168.xxx.1. So for example, if your systems IP is 192.168.0.100, the IP address for the router would most likely be 192.168.0.1. This is not a rule, just the way most routers are set up. There are linux tools that can scan the lan. I use nmap for this sort of thing. ( the xxx.yyy are variable fields )

To find your IP address, open a command prompt. Run the command /sbin/ifconfig. The output will look something like this:



The field inet is the IPv4 address field and inet6 is the IPv6 address field. The name of the interface is the name on the first line, on the left. The above is my system, since your system is wireless, the name will be different, probably something like wlan0.

Give it a try and see if you can ping your router.
I pinged my router IP and it has zero percent packet loss.
I logged into it, typing IP in address bar (passwords are the same almost everywhere) and the system time was Jan 1st 1970. Is it normal?
 
Old 12-25-2014, 02:12 PM   #8
camorri
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Quote:
and the system time was Jan 1st 1970. Is it normal?
No, I would fix that. It may be the source of some of your problems.

Change the password on your router, to something you know, and don't make it too trivial, or easily guessed. There are black hats out there that like to hack routers.

Have a look through the settings, and ask if you are not sure.
 
  


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