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-   -   networking OSX 10.2.8 (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-networking-3/networking-osx-10-2-8-a-212555/)

alancook 08-02-2004 02:11 PM

networking OSX 10.2.8
 
Hello, Relatively new to Linux and I would like to know if it's possible to network my SuSe 9.1 system with my Mac running 10.2.8. Both computers are in a lan behind a dsl router.

I've started file sharing and installed and started samba but I cant see anything from the mac side and I've no idea how the SuSe system goes about discovering the mac disk.

Any help greatly appreciated.

Alan :scratch:

demian 08-02-2004 04:41 PM

samba is the windows way of making local disks accessable over a network (or really smb is and samba is the reverse engeneered implementation on linux). So, unless there are windows boxes involved I wouldn't use samba at all: While it does work it's alien to both Mac OS and Linux.

Why not try nfs. I'm not a hundred percent sure (not a suse user) how suse sets up nfs but I guess it's done via yast. If not just install an nfs server and enter the directories you want to share in /etc/exports. You add a line like

/data 192.168.1.10(ro)

to export everything below /data to the host with IP 192.168.1.10 (read-only in this example). In Mac OS go to the finder hit CMD-K (or Go->Connect to Server) and enter "nfs://hostname/path/to/exported/dir". So, if the nfs server with the example exports file from above had IP 192.168.1.1 enter nfs://192.168.1.1/data. That's it. Now you can browse the /data dir from the linux box on the mac. (Works on OSX 10.3.4)

This, of course, works the other way round too, though you might have to install an nfs server on OS X first. An even easier way to see your mac HD on the Linux box is to use fish in konqueror. This is an implemetation of an ssh filesystem and it totally rocks. (Might be KDE 3.2 only). So, say your mac has ssh access enabled an has IP 192.168.1.10 just enter

fish://user@192.168.1.10

enter the password (or make yourself a passphrase less ssh key to skip this) and you can browse the mac filesystem just like any other local volume (through an encrypted ssh connection). Transfer rates seem to drop a little when using fish (for me it's 5-6MB/s vs 10-12MB/s when using nfs) but that's good good enough for most tasks.


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