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Old 04-18-2010, 09:16 PM   #1
TedCleggett
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File Transfer using Ethernet Cross Over Cable


Hello,

I am running Ubuntu Linux 9.10 on my laptop and desktop. I would like to transfer files from one to the other using an Ethernet Cross Over Cable. Is there software already installed in the bundle, that would allow me to setup network drives for each machine when the cable is connected. Also how would I setup the configuration.

Thanks.
 
Old 04-18-2010, 09:41 PM   #2
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TedCleggett View Post
Hello,

I am running Ubuntu Linux 9.10 on my laptop and desktop. I would like to transfer files from one to the other using an Ethernet Cross Over Cable. Is there software already installed in the bundle, that would allow me to setup network drives for each machine when the cable is connected. Also how would I setup the configuration.

Thanks.
You can do it via FTP, SFTP, SCP, Samba, or NFS. All are available to use, and all require different setup/configuration steps.

What do you WANT to use? Are you going to use a static IP address for your systems, set up manually? How many files? How big? Directories too? Some details would be helpful.

If I had to do a quick-and-dirty, plug in the crossover cable, manually configure your interfaces with whatever addresses you want, fire up SSH (if it isn't running already), then just use SCP to copy things over. All you need is a user ID on both boxes.
 
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Old 04-18-2010, 09:43 PM   #3
kbp
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Are you looking for a permanent setup ? ... otherwise I'd just use rsync
 
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Old 04-19-2010, 12:00 AM   #4
TedCleggett
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne View Post
You can do it via FTP, SFTP, SCP, Samba, or NFS. All are available to use, and all require different setup/configuration steps.

What do you WANT to use? Are you going to use a static IP address for your systems, set up manually? How many files? How big? Directories too? Some details would be helpful.

If I had to do a quick-and-dirty, plug in the crossover cable, manually configure your interfaces with whatever addresses you want, fire up SSH (if it isn't running already), then just use SCP to copy things over. All you need is a user ID on both boxes.
I want to be able to plug in the cable and have the laptop reconnect to shared folders and the same for the desktop. I would like the drive to reconnect as a network drive. I am not looking to run an FTP program every time I need to transfer a file.

Thanks
 
Old 04-19-2010, 12:58 AM   #5
damgar
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Ubuntu has tools for setting up shares and connecting to servers under "places". It also has a network discovery tool. You can probably get by simply with the sharing tools and connecting the machines.

I like samba because it's portable. I define my samba shares, and then add the shares to /etc/fstab which will cause the shares to appear as local directories on each machine. The downside to using Ubuntu is that there is a goofy bug where if you go the fstab route and shutdown the machine when the remote shares are unavailable then it will hang for as long as 30 seconds on shutdown. I've been able to work around it on some machines and not others running 9.04 with the only difference being 32 vs 64 bit architectures.
 
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Old 04-19-2010, 01:29 PM   #6
TedCleggett
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Quote:
Originally Posted by damgar View Post
Ubuntu has tools for setting up shares and connecting to servers under "places". It also has a network discovery tool. You can probably get by simply with the sharing tools and connecting the machines.

I like samba because it's portable. I define my samba shares, and then add the shares to /etc/fstab which will cause the shares to appear as local directories on each machine. The downside to using Ubuntu is that there is a goofy bug where if you go the fstab route and shutdown the machine when the remote shares are unavailable then it will hang for as long as 30 seconds on shutdown. I've been able to work around it on some machines and not others running 9.04 with the only difference being 32 vs 64 bit architectures.
Ok, I believe I am not being clear on what it is I am trying to accomplish. I do not have a server. I only have a desktop PC and a laptop PC. I want to connect them using the Ethernet card in each PC using a "Cross Over" cable. I would like to have both systems recognize each others shared folders when the cable is connected.

Is this possible? I did setup Samba on both machines, but I can not get them to SEE each other. I have not setup up any IP addresses because I am not sure; 1) What to set. and 2) Where to set it.

Thanks for your help.
 
Old 04-19-2010, 01:43 PM   #7
damgar
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In your set up you will have 2 servers. Any machine sharing it's resources is a server.

Set an IP on each computer's ethernet port, if there's only one than that is eth0, to be in the same subnet. Like :
Code:
desktop
IP address 192.168.1.5
subnet mask 255.255.255.0
gateway 192.168.1.6

laptop
IP address 192.168.1.6
subnet mask 255.255.255.0
gateway 192.168.1.5
The gateways may not even be neccessary, but can't hurt. You'll have to make sure that they are in the same workgroup, at my house I call it "workgroup" because I'm lazy and it's easy.

The IP addresses can be set in NetworkManager (the little computer icons on the panel)if you don't see it, use the "add to panel" feature to enable it.

Then in places go to network and if it doesn't see the other machine try clicking on "windows network" or something to that effect, use context clues.

Post back if you can't get it from there.

Last edited by damgar; 04-19-2010 at 01:47 PM.
 
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Old 04-19-2010, 02:16 PM   #8
brucehinrichs
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Quote:
I do not have a server. I only have a desktop PC and a laptop PC.
I think some of your confusion stems from this. It is a little difficult to wrap your mind around at first (it was for me ). Focus on damgar's statement:
Quote:
In your set up you will have 2 servers. Any machine sharing it's resources is a server.
Pay particular attention to the second sentence. When I started linux, I had a picture in my mind of a servser being some big, black box with no terminal, etc. In this instance both of your machines are sharing resources (your stated goal), therefore they are both servers and they are both also host and client to each other.
 
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Old 04-19-2010, 02:36 PM   #9
damgar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brucehinrichs View Post
I think some of your confusion stems from this. It is a little difficult to wrap your mind around at first (it was for me ). Focus on damgar's statement: Pay particular attention to the second sentence. When I started linux, I had a picture in my mind of a servser being some big, black box with no terminal, etc. In this instance both of your machines are sharing resources (your stated goal), therefore they are both servers and they are both also host and client to each other.
What he said. A server is really just a program and the machine that program is running on is also frequently called a server. On your Ubuntu machines you will have to make sure that you have the "samba server service" <-- just a more precise choice of words, as well as the "samba client" running in order for each machine to see the other. This is the equivalent in windows of "enable file and print sharing".
 
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Old 04-19-2010, 03:16 PM   #10
TedCleggett
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SUCCESS! Thanks everyone!

Quote:
Originally Posted by damgar View Post
In your set up you will have 2 servers. Any machine sharing it's resources is a server.

Set an IP on each computer's ethernet port, if there's only one than that is eth0, to be in the same subnet. Like :
Code:
desktop
IP address 192.168.1.5
subnet mask 255.255.255.0
gateway 192.168.1.6

laptop
IP address 192.168.1.6
subnet mask 255.255.255.0
gateway 192.168.1.5
The gateways may not even be neccessary, but can't hurt. You'll have to make sure that they are in the same workgroup, at my house I call it "workgroup" because I'm lazy and it's easy.

The IP addresses can be set in NetworkManager (the little computer icons on the panel)if you don't see it, use the "add to panel" feature to enable it.

Then in places go to network and if it doesn't see the other machine try clicking on "windows network" or something to that effect, use context clues.

Post back if you can't get it from there.
I setup the system as you suggested and it works fine. It is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks for everyones help.
 
Old 04-19-2010, 03:41 PM   #11
damgar
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Glad to help. Don't forget to mark the thread as solved.
 
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Old 03-24-2012, 08:58 AM   #12
ravidborse
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Connect 2 Fedora Linux Machines Using CrossOver Cable

Hi I am try to connect 2 Fedora Machines and Following is the Procedure I done
I use name for Machines are A and B

Step 1: Edit File
Code:
vim /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0
and Enter Details For Machine A
Code:
DEVICE="eth0"
HWADDR="<NIC HW ADDR OF MACHINE A use ifconfig>"
BOOTPROTO="static"
ONBOOT="yes"
NM_CONTROLLED="yes"
TYPE=Ethernet
NETMASK=255.255.255.0
IPADDR=192.168.1.1
BROADCAST=192.168.1.255
IPV4_FAILURE_FATAL=yes
IPV6INIT=no
Step 2: Edit File
Code:
vim /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0
and Enter Details For Machine B
Code:
DEVICE="eth0"
HWADDR="<NIC HW ADDR OF MACHINE B use ifconfig>"
BOOTPROTO="static"
ONBOOT="yes"
NM_CONTROLLED="yes"
TYPE=Ethernet
NETMASK=255.255.255.0
IPADDR=192.168.1.2
BROADCAST=192.168.1.255
IPV4_FAILURE_FATAL=yes
IPV6INIT=no
Step 3: Connect Both Machines With Ethernet CrossOver Cable.

Step 4: [Optional] reboot.

Step 5: ping 192.168.1.1 from machine B and ping 192.168.1.2 from machine A

Following steps are the steps in case if you are still not able to Ping. It might be possible that because of network card's speed difference your machines are not able to ping. Set both machines speed constant then it might work.

Code:
	-  On Machine A enter command:
		ethtool -s eth0 speed 10 duplex half

	-  On Machine B enter command:
		ethtool -s eth0 speed 10 duplex half
Then repeat Step 5

If your machines still not able to Ping each Other then do the following

Code:
[root@localhost ravidborse]# lspci 
00:00.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation Mobile 915GM/PM/GMS/910GML Express Processor to DRAM Controller (rev 03)
00:02.0 VGA compatible controller: Intel Corporation Mobile 915GM/GMS/910GML Express Graphics Controller (rev 03)
00:02.1 Display controller: Intel Corporation Mobile 915GM/GMS/910GML Express Graphics Controller (rev 03)
00:1b.0 Audio device: Intel Corporation 82801FB/FBM/FR/FW/FRW (ICH6 Family) High Definition Audio Controller (rev 03)
00:1d.0 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801FB/FBM/FR/FW/FRW (ICH6 Family) USB UHCI #1 (rev 03)
00:1d.1 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801FB/FBM/FR/FW/FRW (ICH6 Family) USB UHCI #2 (rev 03)
00:1d.2 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801FB/FBM/FR/FW/FRW (ICH6 Family) USB UHCI #3 (rev 03)
00:1d.3 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801FB/FBM/FR/FW/FRW (ICH6 Family) USB UHCI #4 (rev 03)
00:1d.7 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82801FB/FBM/FR/FW/FRW (ICH6 Family) USB2 EHCI Controller (rev 03)
00:1e.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 82801 Mobile PCI Bridge (rev d3)
00:1f.0 ISA bridge: Intel Corporation 82801FBM (ICH6M) LPC Interface Bridge (rev 03)
00:1f.2 IDE interface: Intel Corporation 82801FBM (ICH6M) SATA Controller (rev 03)
00:1f.3 SMBus: Intel Corporation 82801FB/FBM/FR/FW/FRW (ICH6 Family) SMBus Controller (rev 03)
06:08.0 Ethernet controller: Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. RTL-8139/8139C/8139C+ (rev 10)
06:09.0 CardBus bridge: Texas Instruments PCI7420 CardBus Controller
06:09.2 FireWire (IEEE 1394): Texas Instruments PCI7x20 1394a-2000 OHCI Two-Port PHY/Link-Layer Controller
06:09.3 Mass storage controller: Texas Instruments PCI7420/7620 Combo CardBus, 1394a-2000 OHCI and SD/MS-Pro Controller
06:0a.0 Network controller: Intel Corporation PRO/Wireless 2200BG [Calexico2] Network Connection (rev 05)
Check which drivers are loaded in
Code:
	dmesg | grep Ethernet
	lsmod | grep 8139
I entered lspci command and look at the which ethernet controller is using your machines.
My A Machine is using RTL8101E/8102E and Above lspci output is of Machine B
Download the respective linux drivers from the Ethernet Card Provider and install them. These drivers are very easy to install. Read readme in the drivers folder.

Then Do
Code:
ssh username@192.168.1.2
From Machine A. You can View and copy files

Best Of Luck
ravidborse
 
  


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