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Old 06-06-2017, 12:17 PM   #1
alanv
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Question Does a router automatically work as a LAN?


I am not well-versed in networking, so I might not be asking the right question.

I have wifi access through a router (which is connected to a modem, which is connected to the wall). Two of my computers are connected to the router using wifi (compA and compB), so I can ssh between them easily.

The problem is that the speed transfer between my computers seems to be at most the speed I am given by my ISP (which is slow). I thought that the connection would be compA -> router -> compB (so as fast as the router allows), but I feel that it is compA -> router -> modem -> ISP -> model -> router -> compB (or something like that).

Why is the speed between computers on the same wifi network not the maximum allowed by the router?

Thanks
 
Old 06-06-2017, 12:32 PM   #2
wpeckham
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alanv View Post
I am not well-versed in networking, so I might not be asking the right question.

I have wifi access through a router (which is connected to a modem, which is connected to the wall). Two of my computers are connected to the router using wifi (compA and compB), so I can ssh between them easily.

The problem is that the speed transfer between my computers seems to be at most the speed I am given by my ISP (which is slow). I thought that the connection would be compA -> router -> compB (so as fast as the router allows), but I feel that it is compA -> router -> modem -> ISP -> model -> router -> compB (or something like that).

Why is the speed between computers on the same wifi network not the maximum allowed by the router?

Thanks
LAN is your Local Area Network, which will include all of the machines BEHIND the router (ie: in your home). The router acts as a gateway from your LAN to the the internet. Your first idea on the routing should be correct, your internal traffic should not be travelling outside your LAN unless you address it using an external address. This assumes that both LAN nodes involved are in the DHCP subnet presented by the router.

HOWEVER, the speed of a network transfer is, at most, the speed of the SLOWEST component or link in the LAN path. If the router, either WIFI link, either WIFI NIC, or either NODE is slow then the transfer will be slow. In addition, if all of that is fast but something starts to cause Radio Interference that effectively slows the WIFI throughput, your transfer will BECOME slow. (My old router let me know when our Microwave was in use! Dragged to a crawl!)

If in doubt, if you can, use Cat-5 wire and the physical ports. Native speed is faster, and it is more difficult to mess it up. (I know, much less convenient, but generally much faster and far more reliable.)
 
Old 06-06-2017, 12:43 PM   #3
michaelk
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There are several factors that determine speed and your correct that a WiFi connection is only between the computers and the router.

What is the make/model of the router What are its capabilities? What is its bandwidth?
What type of wireless adapters are installed in your computers?

What type of wireless i.e. 802.ll a/b/g/n/ac etc. The slowest type will ultimately determine the fastest possible speed but there are other factors. The greater the distance from the router the slower the speed. Any steel, concrete, brick or other major obstacle will also cause the connection to be slower.

Typically internet speed is stated in bits per second but transfer speed is reported in bytes per second. So while transfers appear to be slower they are really not. 1 Byte = 8 bits.

Last edited by michaelk; 06-06-2017 at 04:52 PM.
 
Old 06-06-2017, 02:35 PM   #4
suicidaleggroll
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Your understanding of the situation is correct, I think what we're missing are some specifics with regards to router/NIC model numbers and the actual speeds you're seeing.

What may be happening is that your router/NIC is ultimately the bottleneck due to outdated technology, poor signal strength, etc. In that case it's not that your LAN speed is being throttled to the speed of your ISP, but that ALL traffic, LAN and WAN, are being limited to the same speed by your router/NIC.
 
Old 06-07-2017, 09:35 PM   #5
sundialsvcs
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Perhaps it might be useful for me to try to explain ... "exactly what 'a router' is!"

Consider this:
  1. Within your home, you have "a local network" ... "your LAN" ... which consists of two computers ... compA and compB ... but which might well also consist of your tablets or phones. In short, "several computers."
  2. And yet, how many cables are coming out of your router and plugging into the wall? Only one. Obviously this is the one and only connection that somehow enables many distinct computers (within your home) to individually "reach The Internet.™"
"Your router" is the Piece of Magic that allows this to happen. Here's how it works.

First of all, "there are two networks here." Your local network, and The Internet.™ And, the only network that any of your devices can directly reach is ... "your local network." Any device on that (local) network can directly reach any other device without any further assistance from your router, but none of them can directly reach The Internet!

Your "Router" acts as "a route," or "a gateway," to The Internet.™ Any network traffic that is destined for any address that is not "within your local network" ... that therefore represents anywhere and everywhere in The Internet™ ... must be sent to your Router first, for final delivery to The Internet.™

And so, any reply that might be received from The Internet™ must necessarily flow back through your Router, so that your Router can deliver it to the proper machine on your local network.

Your Router acts as the ever-faithful switchboard operator between the two.

Here's the trick: "The Internet™" knows nothing(!) about "the individual computers within your house!" It knows of only one address, which corresponds to "your Router." But, thanks to a bit of network magic called NAT ("Network Address Translation"), as performed by your Router, it never has to know any details whatsoever about your internal network – or even, that "an internal network" exists. Your Router does it all.

(And, all this time, you thought that the thing just consisted of blinkenlights ...)

. . . . . .

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 06-07-2017 at 09:43 PM.
 
Old 06-07-2017, 10:40 PM   #6
frankbell
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This is the best tutorial on subnetting that I've seen: http://www.ralphb.net/IPSubnet/index.html

Don't be put off by the HTML v. 3 formatting. When I first encountered this tutorial, it was on a university website. What I think happened is that the author left academia and put this up, unchanged, on his personal site.

If you want well-written, clearly explained explanation of how subnetting works, give it a read.
 
  


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