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Linux - Laptop and Netbook Having a problem installing or configuring Linux on your laptop? Need help running Linux on your netbook? This forum is for you. This forum is for any topics relating to Linux and either traditional laptops or netbooks (such as the Asus EEE PC, Everex CloudBook or MSI Wind).

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Old 12-10-2008, 07:45 AM   #16
nsp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dive View Post
My thinkpad gets very hot when compiling code so I installed gtk fan control which I can run and boost the fan a bit.
Maybe you can try SlowCoder's method mentioned above, buying a laptop stand. There are many types of them, some with usb-powered cooling fans.
 
Old 12-10-2008, 08:11 AM   #17
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There were a batch of one sort of laptop whose batteries would spontaneously catch fire and flare up. Wouldn't like to have one of those on my lap
 
Old 12-10-2008, 09:45 AM   #18
nsp
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Originally Posted by dive View Post
There were a batch of one sort of laptop whose batteries would spontaneously catch fire and flare up. Wouldn't like to have one of those on my lap
I am thinking about unplugging my battery pack..... :-)

I had been always thinking that batteries in laptop are not necessary. At least for me, the battery pack is cumbersome and of no great use. In most time it is just a UPS. My personal suggestion is that the battery pack should be designed as an optional accessory, which can work beside the power adapter.
 
Old 12-10-2008, 10:24 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nsp View Post
I am thinking about unplugging my battery pack..... :-)

I had been always thinking that batteries in laptop are not necessary. At least for me, the battery pack is cumbersome and of no great use. In most time it is just a UPS. My personal suggestion is that the battery pack should be designed as an optional accessory, which can work beside the power adapter.
If you never use your laptop in a location where external power is unavailable, sure, go ahead and remove the battery. But one of the major functions of laptops is using them where a desktop can't be used, where there is no outside power available.
 
Old 12-11-2008, 07:06 AM   #20
nsp
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Originally Posted by SlowCoder View Post
If you never use your laptop in a location where external power is unavailable, sure, go ahead and remove the battery. But one of the major functions of laptops is using them where a desktop can't be used, where there is no outside power available.
Yes, usually my laptop is used as a normal desktop, 24-hour plugged. And my former two laptops were the same. Usually the batteries pack works as a UPS, for protecting the motherboard. I was told that if batteries were removed, the motherboard would be exposed to voltage impulse. I thought the possibility of damaging the motherboard was tiny since there is an adapter, but that guy was a professional. And I do have a batteries pack.

Last edited by nsp; 12-11-2008 at 07:10 AM.
 
Old 12-11-2008, 07:13 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nsp View Post
Yes, usually my laptop is used as a normal desktop, 24-hour plugged. And my former two laptops were the same. Usually the batteries pack works as a UPS, for protecting the motherboard. I was told that if batteries were removed, the motherboard would be exposed to voltage impulse. I thought the possibility of damaging the motherboard was tiny since there is an adapter, but that guy was a professional. And I do have a batteries pack.
If you use your laptop as a desktop, why not just buy a desktop next time? They're usually less expensive for the same specification and easier to upgrade.

I bought a laptop last time, but found it was too heavy for me to be bothered to transport it all the time, so it just sat in its dock the whole time. I've now bought a desktop (albeit a mini-itx desktop) since there was no advantage to having a laptop, and it doesn't get as hot nor make as much noise as the laptop does.

Last edited by pwc101; 12-11-2008 at 08:16 AM. Reason: damn typo
 
Old 12-11-2008, 08:14 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nsp View Post
Yes, usually my laptop is used as a normal desktop, 24-hour plugged. And my former two laptops were the same. Usually the batteries pack works as a UPS, for protecting the motherboard. I was told that if batteries were removed, the motherboard would be exposed to voltage impulse. I thought the possibility of damaging the motherboard was tiny since there is an adapter, but that guy was a professional. And I do have a batteries pack.
I've never heard of a laptop battery that protects the laptop like a UPS. Yes, it will keep the laptop running in case of a power loss, but I don't think any normal laptop power system will protect your equipment from major power fluctuations the same way a real UPS does.
 
Old 12-11-2008, 10:37 AM   #23
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by pwc101 View Post
If you use your laptop as a desktop, why not just buy a desktop next time?
Good question. I have asked myself several times. All three computers I bought for myself ware laptops. All desktops and workstations I have used are provided by my bosses. And several times I have asked my boss for laptops, of which two succeeded. Now one can say that I am a laptop addict.

It's glad to know there are small laptops now, even with lower noise than laptops. And it also remind me Apple's mini-box. But I think I still like laptops. I am not sure about the reason. Maybe just because laptop is simple.

A story may explain some: Once when I was in a business trip, after a short meeting with the co-operative company, I went back to the hotel, thinking about the issue, and said to myself: if only I had gotten my computer here, I could give them answers that very afternoon! From that day on, I tried to establish my laptop workstation. I dreamed one day I could point at my suitcase and say: here is my numerical laboratory, library, entertainment center, image and video diaries, and the gate to all my internet friends.

Last edited by nsp; 12-11-2008 at 10:39 AM.
 
Old 12-11-2008, 10:45 AM   #24
nsp
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Originally Posted by SlowCoder View Post
I've never heard of a laptop battery that protects the laptop like a UPS. Yes, it will keep the laptop running in case of a power loss, but I don't think any normal laptop power system will protect your equipment from major power fluctuations the same way a real UPS does.
I didn't think so too. So I emphasized that it was because the guy was a professional. I have no plan to test it, so I simply accept his suggestion, with a little bit doubt. :-)
 
Old 12-19-2008, 07:33 PM   #25
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Now sum up what I did. It may be useful to others.

To reduce heat producing:
1. Load modules: thinkpad_acpi, acpi_cpufreq, cpufreq_ondemand, thermal, fan, etc.
2. Turn the cpu frequency down manually.
3. Turn the gpu frequency down manually.
4. Removed the second inner hard disk, but found it made very little difference.

To reduce the chances of activating the fan:
Use "tp-fancontrol" to control it, with higher temperature thresholds.

To reduce the noise of fan:
1. Opened and dusted it.
2. Lubricated the fan. Note that this is a disputed method. I didn't have a reliable test, so I can't decide whether it's right or not.

Finally I think I made peace with my T60, but keep thinking about a new X200. Say thanks to those replied.
 
Old 03-17-2009, 07:32 AM   #26
eridout
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I stuck quarter-inch felt pads onto the four existing rubber pads on the underside of the Inspiron 8000 hoping that would help.
 
  


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