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-   -   Will old Oses work on new computer? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/showthread.php?t=4175444283)

kox444 01-05-2013 01:14 PM

Will old Oses work on new computer?
 
Hi. My old computer has bricked. I'm buying new mobo, cpu, gpu, ram. However I'm keeping my old hdd. I have debian squeeze, wheezy, slacko puppy and windoze xp installed. Will any of these OSes work on new configuration?

otoomet 01-05-2013 01:35 PM

Most of the stuff should work, given you use standard kernel with all the hardware support included. Custom-compiled drivers may not work, and some drivers for the new stuff may be missing (like proprietary graphics drivers). Some of your distros are quite new, but I am not sure if you can find drivers for all the newes hardware for XP. In case you have 32-bit non-PAE kernels, those will not support more than 4G memory.

You probably have to reinstall the bootloader.

kox444 01-05-2013 01:53 PM

I know about minor drivers. I just want to know if any of the oses can run at all. I hope the bootloader will work. I have ide dvd drive and the new mobo won't have an ide output. So I don't know if I buy the adapter until then and really hope that I will boot the os succesfully without using dvd drive. The bootloader is installed on ntfs windows partition, I installed it from puppy linux. It is some kind of grub. Grub... something or something...grub. I don't remember. Definately not standard Grub or Grub2. It has file like menu.lst and does backup of menu.lst everytime when I reconfigure it.
Edit: The bootloader is GrubforDos. Do you think it will work without reinstalling?

Shadow_7 01-05-2013 04:52 PM

You should have reverse compatibility if you were on an x86 and system and are going to an x86 system. Getting past secure boot and upgrading bootloader tech might prove a challenge. Assuming that your HDD isn't bricked and not so old as to be PATA (IDE) and your new system doesn't have the hardware. Sometimes goodwill is your friend.

lykwydchykyn 01-06-2013 12:17 AM

I've been swapping Linux-installed HDDs between systems for years, rarely ever had a problem. Mind you, I haven't encountered hardware with UEFI yet.

Windows XP will probably blue screen and need a repair-install run. At the very least it will want you to re-activate.

You should be able to boot a modern system off of a USB flash drive if the DVD doesn't work.

gradinaruvasile 01-06-2013 02:36 AM

I had 2 UEFI mobos and i had no problems with running my Debian Wheezy on them (swapped hdds from my Asus M3N78-VM/AM2+ mobo).
These were an Asus F1A75-M LE/FM1 socket and Gigabyte F2A85X-D3H/FM2 socket (my current build). Both UEFIs had the legacy options. As it seems that UEFIs are basically the same for a given manufacturer (except chipset/cpu/apu specific features - i installed a computer on an Asus P8H61-something 1155 mobo, the UEFI had the same legacy options as the F1A75-M), means that there will be no issues for the foreseeable future because of this on separately sold mobos.
Debian Wheezy ran with no issues (i had to remove the nvidia driver and install the amd one).
Only that for my current mobo (the Gigabyte) i have to use the 3.6 kernel because the stock 3.2 has some issues with the sound - it gives a kernel oops at startup. But with the 3.6 kernel it runs perfectly well.

Now for Windows xp - that will probably not run. If you have monumental luck, you will be able to maybe launch it in safe mode, but dont count on it.

cascade9 01-06-2013 04:02 AM

Win XP should run on most anything you can buy now. Yeah, its old, but I'm yet to see any manufacturers who dotn offer win XP drivers for current hardware.

Two possible issues though. Windows in general hates having its hardware changed. You *might* be able to run windows without reinstalling.... I wouldnt count on it. XP also has no native SATA drivers installed, so it might run with the drives in 'IDE mode' but fail to boot in 'Native SATA mode'. Or if it wont boot at all, trying to install XP with HDDs in native SATA mode will just make windows wonder where the HDD is.

It ispossible to use nLite (and other tools) to get the SATA drivers installed to XP so you can then install in SATA mode (I'd much rather use SATA mode over IDE mode)

Quote:

Originally Posted by kox444 (Post 4863565)
I have ide dvd drive and the new mobo won't have an ide output. So I don't know if I buy the adapter until then and really hope that I will boot the os succesfully without using dvd drive.

I woudlnt bother with getting a IDE-> SATA converter. I'd just buy a new SATA DVD drive. They are cheap, not much more than a converter.

kox444 01-06-2013 08:02 AM

Thanks for replies. I will see.

snowpine 01-06-2013 09:42 AM

I believe you will need to reactive your Windows XP operating system (if you're out of licenses, contact Microsoft and explain the situation, they may gift you a new one).

gradinaruvasile 01-06-2013 10:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by snowpine (Post 4863951)
I believe you will need to reactive your Windows XP operating system (if you're out of licenses, contact Microsoft and explain the situation, they may gift you a new one).

Lol fat chance. First, Windoze XP will 99.99% bluescreen, secondly the gift.

Windows has to be reactivated anyway sometimes even if you change the video card. The most annoying situation i found is that i had to reactivate it by telephone (which works best at night because there is an automated system doing the stuff, no unnecessary talking required). This is assuming that the Windows copy in question is genuine. If you lost your product keys, its easy to download a key finder program and it will find it for you. Or, if you dont have the keys and cannot boot Windoze, boot with Linux or live disk, save your registry (the %systemdrive%\Windows\System32\Config folder) on another partition and after reinstall you can get the keys from the System, SAM or Software registry file.
Anyway, Windows is best to be reinstalled from scratch in these cases because tends to mess itself partially up even if you succesfully boot it and install the new drivers.
In case where multiple OS es are installed (as is this) you will be extra careful because the GRUB bootloader will be overwritten with the Windows one and subsequently you will have to restore it with a live disc - until then the rest of the OSes will not be able to boot. There is a chance that the Windows installer will crap out because of the "unknown" file systems (happened to me with vanilla Windoze installer).

jefro 01-06-2013 08:13 PM

Might have to run all of those in a vm. About the most easy way to get stuff like xp to work and maybe some of the older linux.


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