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Having trouble installing a piece of hardware? Want to know if that peripheral is compatible with Linux?

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Old 08-05-2006, 09:25 PM   #1
conanm4
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Why all the problems?


Why do people use linux if everyone is having hardware problems? I realize that hardware is not supported because of drivers only being made for Windows, but what do you say to someone that wanted to use linux and a piece of hardware isn't supported? It seems kinda dumb to use an OS that needs specific hardware. Oh wait, Apple does that to, but Apple is one of the bad guys.
 
Old 08-05-2006, 09:43 PM   #2
rickh
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Most people have no hardware problem, after perhaps a few glitches getting something set up. My experience has been that hardware works better on Linux than Windows. That's not to denigrate the problems newbies sometimes have because it's not as simple as double clicking a file. But once you get a little experience, and develop a little common sense regarding harware purchases, it's not an issue.
 
Old 08-05-2006, 10:38 PM   #3
lazlow
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The other way to look at this is: How bad are the alternatives if this many people are willing to go through such an initiation?

Lazlow
 
Old 08-06-2006, 02:02 AM   #4
conanm4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lazlow
The other way to look at this is: How bad are the alternatives if this many people are willing to go through such an initiation?

Lazlow
I agree, it's just kind of an annoyance. I'm probably gonna buy a sub $300 pc because that's where the linux market shines in my oppinion.
 
Old 08-06-2006, 02:03 AM   #5
conanm4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickh
Most people have no hardware problem, after perhaps a few glitches getting something set up. My experience has been that hardware works better on Linux than Windows. That's not to denigrate the problems newbies sometimes have because it's not as simple as double clicking a file. But once you get a little experience, and develop a little common sense regarding harware purchases, it's not an issue.
Some hardware I do agree works better, but for example ATI cards run at around 60% the speed on linux compared to Windows.
 
Old 08-06-2006, 09:15 PM   #6
pdgardin
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Cool

I purchased an internal hard drive recently and a case to use it through usb. Of course the drive was unformatted... and Windows couldn't find it. Not in My Computer, nothing showing up in the device manager, not found in the System Administration menu where you are supposed to format a new drive from... I figured it was broken.

Oh, except Linux found it and formatted it no problem.

Hardware issues work both ways. In this case, Linux saved me a long attempt at trying to get a refund from someone on eBay.

-Paul
 
Old 08-07-2006, 10:17 AM   #7
ColonelPanic
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I reckon the problem lies especially in the fact that most development efforts are scattered and not as coordinated as they would be if everything was done under one roof. This then results in a kernel patchwork that only functions out of the box on hardware configs which are very close to a config out of one of the 1000s of developers out there. M$ or Apple don't have this issue since everything happens in a more or less coordinated environment. Their situation also allows them to put enormous pressure on the hardware market.

Linux seems to kind of cruise behind the fat cats and they probably have to stay rather reactive to new hardware, as opposed to being proactive. It also seems that releasing drivers for the latest hardware - quickly that is -has never been a high priority for Linux developers. It's much easier to find rock-solid Linux drivers for hardware that's 3+ years old than dodgy ones for the latest stuff. Unlike M$ who take the other way around, ie. they release something that works so-so but then never make an effort to make it more stable. And then one day with a new release it won't work anymore at all. The show must go on and the $$$$ must flow, innit?
 
Old 08-07-2006, 02:12 PM   #8
conanm4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColonelPanic
I reckon the problem lies especially in the fact that most development efforts are scattered and not as coordinated as they would be if everything was done under one roof. This then results in a kernel patchwork that only functions out of the box on hardware configs which are very close to a config out of one of the 1000s of developers out there. M$ or Apple don't have this issue since everything happens in a more or less coordinated environment. Their situation also allows them to put enormous pressure on the hardware market.

Linux seems to kind of cruise behind the fat cats and they probably have to stay rather reactive to new hardware, as opposed to being proactive. It also seems that releasing drivers for the latest hardware - quickly that is -has never been a high priority for Linux developers. It's much easier to find rock-solid Linux drivers for hardware that's 3+ years old than dodgy ones for the latest stuff. Unlike M$ who take the other way around, ie. they release something that works so-so but then never make an effort to make it more stable. And then one day with a new release it won't work anymore at all. The show must go on and the $$$$ must flow, innit?
I actually in experience have found linux drivers to be very flaky, but that's just in my experiences.
 
Old 08-07-2006, 02:26 PM   #9
masonm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by conanm4
Some hardware I do agree works better, but for example ATI cards run at around 60% the speed on linux compared to Windows.
Really? Funny, mine doesn't.

So, why exactly did you post this? Just trolling, or is there something specific you need to know?

I've been using Linux for better than 10 years and don't seem to have the problems you describe. But then, I'm not dumb enough to buy a winmodem either.

I've run Linux on dozens of different machines from custom built to off the shelf at Wal Mart and they work just fine. Most of the problems people have are based in a lack of knowledge, not any problem with Linux.

Certain hardware, like some wireless cards and printers are still lacking in Linux support from the manufacturers but there are ways around that including simply not buying their crappy equipment in the first place.

I have yet to run across a machine that I couldn't install and run Linux on, so I really don't understand the point(lessness) of your post.
 
Old 08-07-2006, 02:28 PM   #10
Penguin of Wonder
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I don't have hardware problems.
 
Old 08-07-2006, 02:28 PM   #11
masonm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by conanm4
I actually in experience have found linux drivers to be very flaky, but that's just in my experiences.
Judging by this statement alone I'd say your "experience" is probably pretty limited.
 
Old 08-08-2006, 04:12 AM   #12
ColonelPanic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by conanm4
I actually in experience have found linux drivers to be very flaky, but that's just in my experiences.
I don't know about that one mate. I've had quite a few software crashes in Mandriva or the infamous KDE popup but NEVER ever seen the 'yellow exclamation mark' type of thing that M$ got so famous for. And hey, plus it comes out of the blue when you'd least expect it. Or then after applying a 'service pack' you get the 'red cross' (ironic they used that icon isn't it?) until M$ specialists eventually recommend you remove the card, reinstall the OS from scratch, plug it back in and hope it'll work this time...

That said you might not get the latest 24 channel pro audio firewire interface to work at all on Linux (unless you know how to write drivers) but everything that's considered worth investing an effort by Linux developers will get their drivers that just function the way they're supposed to function.

easy
CP
 
Old 08-08-2006, 05:04 AM   #13
davcefai
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My 2cents worth:

1. Drivers flaky? My system is rock solid except for when I do something to mess it up.

2. Support? Any problems I have with Linux are resolved *much* faster than any Windows ones thanks to sites like this.

3. Recently I had to clean up a scanned drawing (A1 size, tiff file). At work, on a Win2K machine with 512MB RAM Windows choked and could not do the job (Paintshop pro or Gimp). At home, using Linux and Gimp with 512MB I cleaned up the image in about 15 minutes, completely flabbergasting my colleagues at work.

Conclusion: Linux is more efficient.
 
Old 08-08-2006, 06:33 AM   #14
drkdick
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I too have been using Linux for a while...

(remember downloading about 60 1.44M disk images for slackware with all the X server goodies and then carrying them home from the university on disks for installation)

... and I still haven't encountered a hardware issue I could not overcome on any of my machines. This is of course because I am extremely picky about what hardware I buy. This is one way to make the situation better: vote with your wallets. Don't buy hardware that isn't compatible with linux, ever. Don't buy it even if it is not intended as a linux platform. I use Linux and MS Windows but I only buy linux-compatible hardware for both platforms, both personally and professionally.

Put pressure on the vendors who in turn may put pressure on the manufacturers.

If you don't know compatibility issues yourself, ask the vendors.
If the vendors can't find out (meaning they aren't qualified for their jobs), say you'll return the product if it doesn't work with linux.

PS: I'm talking mostly PC hardware here, but the same thing applies to other things as well, portable media players for example.
 
  


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