LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Hardware
User Name
Password
Linux - Hardware This forum is for Hardware issues.
Having trouble installing a piece of hardware? Want to know if that peripheral is compatible with Linux?

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 12-10-2006, 09:38 PM   #1
OstermanA
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Location: Seattle, WA
Distribution: CentOS 8
Posts: 99

Rep: Reputation: 20
R/W to NTFS w/ Fedora Core 6


I'm trying to move some files from my iPod to an NTFS partition using Fedora Core 6, but Fedora isn't showing the NTFS partitions. I can read files off the iPod, but the HDD partitions aren't anywhere I can find.

I know almost nothing about Linux, so any help would be appreciated.
 
Old 12-10-2006, 10:12 PM   #2
sadiqdm
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: openSUSE, Ubuntu
Posts: 358

Rep: Reputation: 35
I can't remember where it is in FC, but you should have in the System menu a Disk Partition tool, or something similar. If you can run that it will show you what's on your hard drive, including any Windows partitions.

Be careful, but if you seen any NTFS partitions, you should be able to set them to mount. Linux puts everything into one directory tree, so you don't get network disks like Windows. All partitions have to be mounted before they can be accessed.

If you highlight an NTFS partition, you should be able to find an Edit function (either a button or right click to get a context menu). Then make sure it is set to "Don't Format" (or something similar). It should have an entry for "Mount point". Put in something like "/windows/c". Make sure you have the forward slashes "/". Do this for all the NTFS partitions you want to access - "/windows/d", "/windows/e", etc. At the end you click "OK", or "Finish", or "Accept", or whatever, and it will then ask if you "really want to do this". Make sure the message has nothing about formating and click "Yes". The new info gets written to a file called "fstab" which keeps a list of which hard drive partition gets mounted to which directory.

The new directories should show up without rebooting.

I use Suse, Kubuntu and Slackware and they all have a tool like this. So far I've had no trouble formating, reading, writing or resizing NTFS partitions for NT4, Win2000 & XP. I even had Thunderbird on a dual boot XP/Linux laptop, and used a directory on the XP partition to store my mail folders for both versions. That way I could run whichever OS I needed, and still have access to all my mail.

Once the partitions are mounted you can read from them as any user, but you may need to be root to write.
 
Old 12-10-2006, 11:07 PM   #3
OstermanA
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Location: Seattle, WA
Distribution: CentOS 8
Posts: 99

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 20
Ok, I am root (or as close as you can get on FC6), but I'm not sure how to run console commands as root. I found a "Logical Disk Manager" utility in system, which shows the name and mounts of each of the three partitions, but can't change them. I can "initialize" them, which loses all data (format, I assume) but then still reads as unitialized.

In the console I think I can mount the drive, now that I know what it's called, but it tells me "Only root can do that" and I'm not sure how to run the command as root.

Again, I'm running Fedora Core 6, downloaded as a torrent two days ago.

Edit: Ok, I tried mounting the partition in my GParted live CD, which runs the root account, and discovered that I can't figure out how to make that work either.

Recap:
I'm trying to write to a partition with an NTFS file system using Fedora Core 6.
The partition exists, though I don't know if it's formatted correctly (the Logical Volume Management tool shows it as having an HPFS/NTFS (0x7) partition type, but "no filesystem".
The console 'mount' command requires it be run as root, but I don't know how to do that. (I do know the root password)
The partition name is /dev/hda3

Last edited by OstermanA; 12-11-2006 at 01:11 AM.
 
Old 12-11-2006, 02:07 AM   #4
Wim Sturkenboom
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Roodepoort, South Africa
Distribution: Slackware 10.1/10.2/12, Ubuntu 12.04, Crunchbang Statler
Posts: 3,786

Rep: Reputation: 282Reputation: 282Reputation: 282
Code:
mkdir /mnt/ntfsdisk
mount -t ntfs /dev/hda3 /mnt/ntfsdisk
You can mount your disk anywhere. However, the mnt or media directory is usually used for it. Above I used the mnt directory.
The first command will create a subdirectory in the mnt directory (called ntfsdisk; you can use a name that suites you). You only have to do this once.
The second command will mount the ntfs disk there.

You need root permissions for above.

Writing NTFS is (to my knowledge) still a dangerous business that might result in permanent loss of data.

PS You can make the mount permanent so it will be mounted at boot; I'm however not familiar with FC6.
 
Old 12-11-2006, 03:37 PM   #5
OstermanA
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Location: Seattle, WA
Distribution: CentOS 8
Posts: 99

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 20
Ok, that makes sense. However, I don't know how to run terminal commands as root.
 
Old 12-11-2006, 07:10 PM   #6
Dither
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Location: The Netherlands
Distribution: Fedora 6.0
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by OstermanA
Ok, that makes sense. However, I don't know how to run terminal commands as root.
If you want to run Terminal as root you have two options. The first is to run Terminal entirely as root:

Code:
$ su root
You'll be asked for the root password and you'll run Terminal as root. However, this may be dangerous, as you can really mess up the system as root if you don't know what you're doing.

The other option (and much safer one) is to run only a certain command as root:

Code:
$ su -c 'command'
Be sure to enclose the command between the two apostrophes. After you press Enter, you'll be asked for the root password and only the command is performed as the root user. After the command is performed you'll no longer be root.

Last edited by Dither; 12-11-2006 at 07:12 PM.
 
Old 12-12-2006, 02:00 PM   #7
Wim Sturkenboom
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Roodepoort, South Africa
Distribution: Slackware 10.1/10.2/12, Ubuntu 12.04, Crunchbang Statler
Posts: 3,786

Rep: Reputation: 282Reputation: 282Reputation: 282
Instead of su root it's often easier to use su - root. Advantage of the last one is that the environment is initiated as well, so you don't have the problem that certain commands can not be found.
 
Old 12-14-2006, 10:43 PM   #8
OstermanA
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Location: Seattle, WA
Distribution: CentOS 8
Posts: 99

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 20
I keep getting the following error:
Code:
mount: unknown file system type 'NTFS'
This happens regardless of whether or not I type 'ntfs' in capital letters or not. Anyone got any ideas?

What I'm trying to do with this is get several files onto the partition in a format that my Norton Ghost boot disk can comprehend. What I'm going to try to do is use GParted to make the partition ext3, then convert it to NTFS, but I have serious doubts.
 
Old 12-14-2006, 10:57 PM   #9
mrsims
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2006
Distribution: Red Hat, Fedora, SUSE
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: 0
On FC6 you'll likely need to install ntfs-3g

Code:
yum install ntfs-3g

As an alternative, you could try to mount with type cifs

Code:
mount -t cifs /dev/sda1 /mnt/ntfsdisk
The ntfs-3g package is experimental (still beta) but works pretty well in my experience in writing to NTFS partitions.
 
Old 12-15-2006, 12:15 AM   #10
OstermanA
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Location: Seattle, WA
Distribution: CentOS 8
Posts: 99

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 20
still doesn't work...

maybe a fat32...
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mounting ntfs in Fedora core 6 bob3dan Fedora 17 01-18-2007 04:16 AM
Writing into ntfs from Fedora Core 4 vaithy Fedora 1 07-24-2006 05:40 AM
How Fedora Core 4 Support NTFS? regnox Linux - Newbie 6 08-16-2005 08:57 PM
ntfs support in fedora core 3 einstien Linux - Newbie 1 02-08-2005 02:22 PM
Fedora Core 1, 2.6 and NTFS FrenchTouch Fedora 4 01-02-2004 03:18 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Hardware

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:53 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration