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Old 03-30-2011, 06:32 PM   #1
Lola Kews
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Measuring a case fan?


This is probably a simple question but I really don't know!

How do you measure a case fan to know it's true deminsions whe one is talking about them or whatever?

For an example lets use an 80 mm fan, is it measured from the "Frame" size witch is the total size of the fan or what?

Last edited by Lola Kews; 03-30-2011 at 06:34 PM.
 
Old 03-30-2011, 06:38 PM   #2
serafean
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Hi,
Yes, you measure the frame side size, which should be a little bit more than the fan's diameter.

Serafean
 
Old 03-30-2011, 07:08 PM   #3
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lola Kews View Post
This is probably a simple question but I really don't know!

How do you measure a case fan to know it's true deminsions whe one is talking about them or whatever?

For an example lets use an 80 mm fan, is it measured from the "Frame" size witch is the total size of the fan or what?
Checkout Computer fan. You should find all the information to aid in understanding fans as related to your computer.
 
Old 03-31-2011, 05:26 AM   #4
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For square fans, the stated fan size = frame size. E.G., a 120mm fan will have a 120mm x 120mm frame. Well, to be totally accurate, its normally a mm or so under the stated frame size, so almost all 120mm fans will be 119mm x 119mm, and the same goes for 92mm fans, 80mm fans, etc.. This isnt always true though, I have seen 80mm fans that were bigger than 80mm (81mm x 81mm x 25mm IIRC), and I only noticed because they were a right pain to install in the 80mm fans mounts on the case I was using at the time. If I had of being using screw mounts I would never have noticed.

The real size of the fan will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer for any given fan size, depending on the frame design.

Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
Checkout Computer fan. You should find all the information to aid in understanding fans as related to your computer.
That pretty much covers everything.
 
Old 03-31-2011, 05:15 PM   #5
Lola Kews
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade9 View Post
For square fans, the stated fan size = frame size. E.G., a 120mm fan will have a 120mm x 120mm frame. Well, to be totally accurate, its normally a mm or so under the stated frame size, so almost all 120mm fans will be 119mm x 119mm, and the same goes for 92mm fans, 80mm fans, etc.. This isnt always true though, I have seen 80mm fans that were bigger than 80mm (81mm x 81mm x 25mm IIRC), and I only noticed because they were a right pain to install in the 80mm fans mounts on the case I was using at the time. If I had of being using screw mounts I would never have noticed.

The real size of the fan will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer for any given fan size, depending on the frame design.



That pretty much covers everything.
Thanks Cascade, I tried to answer you in a longer way but the moderator evodently doesn't like my remarks and bombed me out!
 
Old 03-31-2011, 08:19 PM   #6
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lola Kews View Post
Thanks Cascade, I tried to answer you in a longer way but the moderator evodently doesn't like my remarks and bombed me out!
Who bombed you out? Please be specific.
 
Old 04-03-2011, 09:29 AM   #7
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What makes you think that human activity was involved at all?
 
Old 04-03-2011, 11:01 AM   #8
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by archtoad6 View Post
What makes you think that human activity was involved at all?
I was asking for specifics. I did not think it was human related but to start fishing one needs to know some directions or specifics to start with.
 
Old 04-03-2011, 04:15 PM   #9
Lola Kews
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade9 View Post
For square fans, the stated fan size = frame size. E.G., a 120mm fan will have a 120mm x 120mm frame. Well, to be totally accurate, its normally a mm or so under the stated frame size, so almost all 120mm fans will be 119mm x 119mm, and the same goes for 92mm fans, 80mm fans, etc.. This isnt always true though, I have seen 80mm fans that were bigger than 80mm (81mm x 81mm x 25mm IIRC), and I only noticed because they were a right pain to install in the 80mm fans mounts on the case I was using at the time. If I had of being using screw mounts I would never have noticed.

The real size of the fan will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer for any given fan size, depending on the frame design.



That pretty much covers everything.
I appreciate the positive response. I'll have to measure all the fans (4) in the "Lian Li PC 60" to see exactly what they all measure and if/how much bigger I can/could go! It doesn't appear from just looking (sitting on dinning room table) that there is much variation in there sizes if any, but I really don't know.

While we are on the subject, is there a coating that can be put on the fan "Blades" them selves to deter dust buildup?

Last edited by Lola Kews; 04-03-2011 at 04:23 PM.
 
Old 04-03-2011, 04:31 PM   #10
MTK358
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I have a Lian Li PC-60FNW case for my main desktop (http://www.lian-li.com/v2/en/product...26&ss_index=69), and it has a built-in washable filter in the front fan. It hasn't been cleaned since I put it together 2-3 years ago and there is hardly any visible dust inside.
 
Old 04-03-2011, 05:31 PM   #11
theNbomr
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There are a small number of industry standard sizes. You don't need to try to distinguish between fans that are 2 or 3 millimeters different. There is no doubt some variation in dimensions from one manufacturer to another, or even between models made by a single manufacturer. As long as they are the same nominal size, they will be interchangeable. This doesn't imply anything about performance characteristics, however.

--- rod.
 
Old 04-03-2011, 06:31 PM   #12
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Hi,

You can purchase different sizes of filter frames to place on the outside of the chassis for input fans. You can also purchase 5 1/4 input filter frames for the bay area.

Be sure to balance the input & output flows for the fans. For some earlier builds I would seal the side panel access when cooling was a problem. I did not want leaks around the side panels. Even the bong area was controlled by a single speed control. This way I could control flow within the chassis.

You might consider a duct for the CPU instead of a side panel fan.
 
Old 04-10-2011, 08:27 AM   #13
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
You can purchase different sizes of filter frames to place on the outside of the chassis for input fans. You can also purchase 5 1/4 input filter frames for the bay area.

Be sure to balance the input & output flows for the fans. For some earlier builds I would seal the side panel access when cooling was a problem. I did not want leaks around the side panels. Even the bong area was controlled by a single speed control. This way I could control flow within the chassis.
You dont have to put the filters outside of the case, it only really helps with cleaning. I have been known to run old stockings filters on the inside of fan direction of travel, then just cut them off to replace them when they got dirty. Thats pretty nasty though, a better way is to have a removable filter that accessible from outside the case. I've run a case with a filter I made from a coat hanger and old stockings that was invisible on the outside, and it was a 5 second job to lift the front of the case and pull out the filter for cleaning.

Balancing the inputs/outputs, I see some people do it, but again you dont have to. Unless the case is pretty well sealed apart from a filtered air intake, running more exhaust fans than intakes will tend to fill your case with dust and grit (negative air pressure will pull in the junk). Running more intakes will slightly increase the internal air pressure, and should mean the inside is cleaner, but the air intakes on a lot of cases means that you arent really increasing airflow over hot parts (video card and CPU in particular).

What setup you should run as far as fans (inake and exhaust), and filters really depends on the case, and what environment the case will be running in IMO.

BTW, 'bong area'? Not a term I've run across with aircooling before, I've heard of it with watercooling. Though in that case its just an evaporative water cooler variant with a more edgy name.
 
Old 04-10-2011, 09:16 AM   #14
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade9 View Post
You dont have to put the filters outside of the case, it only really helps with cleaning. I have been known to run old stockings filters on the inside of fan direction of travel, then just cut them off to replace them when they got dirty. Thats pretty nasty though, a better way is to have a removable filter that accessible from outside the case. I've run a case with a filter I made from a coat hanger and old stockings that was invisible on the outside, and it was a 5 second job to lift the front of the case and pull out the filter for cleaning.

Balancing the inputs/outputs, I see some people do it, but again you dont have to. Unless the case is pretty well sealed apart from a filtered air intake, running more exhaust fans than intakes will tend to fill your case with dust and grit (negative air pressure will pull in the junk). Running more intakes will slightly increase the internal air pressure, and should mean the inside is cleaner, but the air intakes on a lot of cases means that you arent really increasing airflow over hot parts (video card and CPU in particular).

What setup you should run as far as fans (inake and exhaust), and filters really depends on the case, and what environment the case will be running in IMO.

BTW, 'bong area'? Not a term I've run across with aircooling before, I've heard of it with watercooling. Though in that case its just an evaporative water cooler variant with a more edgy name.
If you look at major server racks you will find input filters on all fans. Even in conditioned environments.

I personally put filter frames on input fans. Added level of maintenance and worth it. Plus filters on the input grill, whether on the front or top. I do like to provide separate ducts for the processor(s) if possible. If input then a filter is placed on that duct. I have used nylon as a pre-filter.

As to the 'bong': A converging nozzle that will direct the air flow. Nothing but a duct style that concentrates flow. Air or water, viscose is the difference. A converging nozzle could be used to control the fluidity of flow for either.

You do not need any of this from some peoples perspective. Essential if you wish to maintain a system in a controlled sense from my point of view. Necessary, if you value the systems condition over time.
 
Old 04-10-2011, 09:35 AM   #15
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
If you look at major server racks you will find input filters on all fans. Even in conditioned environments.

I personally put filter frames on input fans. Added level of maintenance and worth it. Plus filters on the input grill, whether on the front or top. I do like to provide separate ducts for the processor(s) if possible. If input then a filter is placed on that duct. I have used nylon as a pre-filter.
Agreed, 100%. Servers almost always have filters these days. I've seen some older rackmount servers without filters that were filthy. Normally they had at least 1 fan per PSU, + at least one other exhaust fan. So they would get the 'negative pressure' problem. Even in a controlled environment, there are normal humans, and where there is humans there is dust- dead skins cells, the things that eat dead skin cells, etc.. The amount of filth that can be produced by even one human body is pretty amazing...

Its not that hard to design in the tiny amount of space that a filter needs, the server boys (and girls!) like seeing that amount of attention to detail. When you pay that much for a system or case, its understandable.

I pretty much always use filters these days, and I wouldnt buy a case without filters. The last 2 cases I bought have mounts for filters or the filters preinstalled, and I bought the older one in 2002. I try to recommend cases that have filters for other people as well, but sometimes it not really possible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
As to the 'bong': A converging nozzle that will direct the air flow. Nothing but a duct style that concentrates flow. Air or water, viscose is the difference. A converging nozzle could be used to control the fluidity of flow for either.
OK, I'll try to remember that. I try to avoid nozzles myself, they tend to reduce airflow and create more noise. But if you've got one part that needs the air, and a ducting and/or nozzle will direct the air into that area, its probably a good idea.

BTW,the 'bong' water coolers do tend to have a nozzle, but its not really needed. I've seen 'waterfall' style evaporative water coolers that are pretty much the same thing as 'bong' coolers. Its a tradeoff between headheight, pressure, size and what value you place in a name (a nozzle should disperse the water better, more dispersed water = better cooling, but it comes at a cost of pressure and headheight reduction)
 
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