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Old 06-19-2012, 08:49 AM   #1
rblampain
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Keyboard or screen behaving strangely.


I had a problem with my old Toshiba Tecra laptop (over ten years old), what I typed was suddenly showing in another line on my screen. As the text was broken on the screen in the middle of a word or sentence, I kept investigating if I could have accidentally pressed one of the arrows but often my fingers were far away from this area when the line broke.

The electricity supply came from solar panels, through a battery bank and an old sine wave inverter which died a few months ago. One of the experts at LQ mentioned in another post the line break problem could have been caused by a dying inverter.

Since my satellite Internet connection was very slow, I decided to buy a new notebook (Asus notebook model X532) after buying a new and bigger true sinewave inverter but I am having the same problem: as I type, text is unexpectedly continued on another line or in the wrong place on the same line in Gedit.

The notebook and the Internet modem plus a light are the only electrical appliances used through the inverter when the problem occurs. I have a large 12 volt Danfoss compressor running a fridge/freezer all the time, connected to the battery bank.

Now and more puzzling to me, the same problem should have happen twice or trice while I typed this but it has'nt.

Any suggestion?

Thank you for your help.
 
Old 06-20-2012, 01:14 AM   #2
RandomTroll
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You don't need an inverter to power a laptop. It's inefficient to use one. I ran on solar power for years. I built a dc-dc converter that turned the 10-17 VDC output of the solar panels (batteries after dark) to the 17 volts that laptop needed, then 16 v for the next laptop.

Laptops all have switching power supplies. They don't need sine wave input. If they are properly made they don't even need AC input: you can power them from 100 VDC.
 
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Old 06-28-2012, 11:18 AM   #3
rblampain
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Thank you for your answer and my apologies for the delay as I was hoping a hint of what the problem could have been.

As the laptop and the inverter are new, I can only guess what is causing the keyboard problem is the satellite Internet modem, this would also explain the slow connection the unit provides (subject of another thread).

I like to build "kits", my only experience in electronics, and I am tempted to follow your suggestion because I have a number of gadgets running from this inverter.

I assume I would need at least 2 converters, one step-down for voltages below 12VDC and another, a boost for voltages above 12VDC which would provide the bulk of the power at around 144W.

Googling for a solution to this problem gives very little except straight converters or diagrams for 12 to 24VDC although I can find 12VDC to 5VDC converters and diagrams.

I would prefer to buy factory-made appliances but except for the modem 24VDC input (if available) and the 2 phones @ 5VDC, the other power supplies need to be taylor-made, 8.5VDC, 19VDC and 32VDC (if I understand my situation).

Can you suggest how to deal with this? And how to find diagrams (I am prepared to pay for these).

Here is what the inverter is running:
Asus notebook 19VDC @ 3.42A
HP Deskjet printer 32VDC @ 1.56A
Internet modem 8.5VDC @ 1.8A
Internet modem 24VDC @ 1.2A
VoIP 5v @ 2A
Satellite mobile phone 5v @ 0.5A
LG flat screen TV 240VAC @ 0.7A (will leave out of this project).
Excluding TV, consumption is 144W above 12VDC and 27.5W below 12VDC

The battery bank is 1.5KW @ 12V

Thank you for your help.

---------- Post added 06-29-12 at 12:18 AM ----------

Thank you for your answer and my apologies for the delay as I was hoping a hint of what the problem could have been.

As the laptop and the inverter are new, I can only guess what is causing the keyboard problem is the satellite Internet modem, this would also explain the slow connection the unit provides (subject of another thread).

I like to build "kits", my only experience in electronics, and I am tempted to follow your suggestion because I have a number of gadgets running from this inverter.

I assume I would need at least 2 converters, one step-down for voltages below 12VDC and another, a boost for voltages above 12VDC which would provide the bulk of the power at around 144W.

Googling for a solution to this problem gives very little except straight converters or diagrams for 12 to 24VDC although I can find 12VDC to 5VDC converters and diagrams.

I would prefer to buy factory-made appliances but except for the modem 24VDC input (if available) and the 2 phones @ 5VDC, the other power supplies need to be taylor-made, 8.5VDC, 19VDC and 32VDC (if I understand my situation).

Can you suggest how to deal with this? And how to find diagrams (I am prepared to pay for these).

Here is what the inverter is running:
Asus notebook 19VDC @ 3.42A
HP Deskjet printer 32VDC @ 1.56A
Internet modem 8.5VDC @ 1.8A
Internet modem 24VDC @ 1.2A
VoIP 5v @ 2A
Satellite mobile phone 5v @ 0.5A
LG flat screen TV 240VAC @ 0.7A (will leave out of this project).
Excluding TV, consumption is 144W above 12VDC and 27.5W below 12VDC

The battery bank is 1.5KW @ 12V

Thank you for your help.
 
Old 06-28-2012, 11:29 AM   #4
rblampain
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I seem unable to edit.
The values given above are those of the power supplies, all accept 100 to 240VAC.
Sorry for the duplication of the text above.
Please relocate if necessary.

---------- Post added 06-29-12 at 12:29 AM ----------

I seem unable to edit.
The values given above are those of the power supplies, all accept 100 to 240VAC.
Sorry for the duplication of the text above.
Please relocate if necessary.
 
Old 06-29-2012, 05:25 PM   #5
RandomTroll
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rblampain View Post
I can only guess what is causing the keyboard problem is the satellite Internet modem
I don't see how this makes sense. I don't think you have keyboard
problems. You imagine that you command your computer. The keyboard
seems like the 'command module'; your computer misbehaves, you blame
the keyboard.

The first power supply for the computer puts out 19 VDC. Nothing in
your computer uses 19 VDC. It has an internal power supply that puts
out 5, 3.3 (or whatever the CPU uses), something like 12 for the
display, perhaps some other voltages. Both power supplies are
switching power supplies. They don't care whether the input voltage
is AC or DC. The first probably needs no more than 25 Volts to work -
as long as it gets enough current. I would hope that defects in the
input power would be eliminated before they get to circuits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rblampain View Post
I assume I would need at least 2 converters
I built one for each device. I never used an inverter. I wired the
home in DC.

I don't know what's on the market. I bought an all-purpose power
supply for my computer for the car that puts out a variety of
voltages. I think it was an SDR-70W. I can't put my hands on it at
the moment. It was about $15 10 years ago. It's made to plug into a
cigarette lighter socket. It would be cheaper to make one for home
use in a simpler format but there may not be much market for them.

I more wanted to make the point that electronic devices have switching
power supplies these days and don't care much about input power: it
can be AC, DC, 50 HZ, 60 HZ, 1,000 HZ. They don't benefit from a sine
wave inverter. If you're already inverting and happy with that, have
your house wired with that, don't have battery power distributed - I
wouldn't bother make DC-DC converters. I told my story to emphasize
that I don't think power is a problem and a sine-wave inverter is
unecessary for devices with switching power supplies. If you think
the inverter could be the problem you can test the hypothesis by
bypassing it.

Your TV probably has a DC input in it somewhere. I had to open up my
devices that had internal power supplies to wire DC power directly.
 
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Old 06-30-2012, 01:35 AM   #6
rblampain
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Thank you for your explanation, I will wait till I get the new satellite Internet gear and see if it solves the problem.
 
  


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