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Having trouble installing a piece of hardware? Want to know if that peripheral is compatible with Linux?

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Old 09-02-2008, 02:27 AM   #16
H_TeXMeX_H
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snarf53563 View Post
Most self-proclaimed kernel building experts recommend specifying *your* cpu-type in the make config.
Oh, I recommend it too, that will lead perhaps to the greatest speedup. I never said not to re-compile your kernel for your processor. I highly recommend that you do that. Instead I said don't waste your time trying to squeeze out more performance by recompiling packages for your processor. If you really wanted performance that badly, go for 64-bit, it most cases it leads to a much greater speedup than you would get by recompiling with different CFLAGS. The new SEE* registers aren't even available in 32-bit mode anyway. Also, why don't you try Gentoo if you really firmly believe that CFLAGS are your friend.

Last edited by H_TeXMeX_H; 09-02-2008 at 02:28 AM.
 
Old 09-02-2008, 11:20 AM   #17
Snarf53563
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Thanks for the input guys, regardless of how useful it proves to me;
and,
sorry if I came off like someone who's feather's were ruffled by flamers in a political forum.

Maybe a more appropriate question would have been:

When your cpu is so new that Linux doesn't recognize it yet,
what other options are worth trying for best results?
(with considerations for potential gains/pitfalls)

I also appreciate that my inappropriate semantic "emulating" was an inaccurate way to refer to "backward compatibility" was mentioned.

FYI;
I bought this computer like any typical shopper;
in that I tried to get the most I could find within a given budget,
and this one was quad-core for near the price of dual-core.

My plans for it are to experiment with programming and system administration;
use of shared binaries will be very limited,
preferring those that can be compiled locally.

It just felt like I was settling for a (presumed) less than optimal OS kernel,
if I went with the safe from-the-box default;
and a little disturbing that not getting past square-one (identifying your specific hardware when configuring the kernel) in a confident manner would nag my conscience.

Admittedly, I am kind of rusty at this stuff;
(used to swim in C/unix ... 15 years ago)
but, I like to know/learn how to do things myself.
 
Old 09-02-2008, 12:19 PM   #18
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What kernel version are you trying to compile, if it's too old it won't have it as an option. Try a newer kernel from kernel.org
 
Old 09-03-2008, 09:42 AM   #19
Snarf53563
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I installed the most recent Slackware distribution (12.1),
which contains the 2.6.24.5 Linux kernel.

After contacting AMD about this, it appears best to avoid 64-bit Linux;
as my computer system does not have 64-bit devices/drivers.

So, my options appear limited to trying a newer Linux kernel.
(either doing it myself or waiting for a future Slackware release)

And, for a newer kernel to have a chance of solving this dilemma,
first I must update the GNU compiler collection on my computer.
(the latest GCC package *does* have support for my cpu-family)
Otherwise, re-compiling the kernel locally won't result in success.

Wish me luck
 
Old 09-03-2008, 10:50 AM   #20
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You should also take a look at this article, it's fairly recent:
http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...item=961&num=1

I've also heard that the Phenom series processors have issues (such as high error rate and instability running any OS).
 
Old 09-03-2008, 01:16 PM   #21
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Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snarf53563 View Post
<snip>

After contacting AMD about this, it appears best to avoid 64-bit Linux;
as my computer system does not have 64-bit devices/drivers.

<snip>
You are speaking of the chipset now? Which one?
 
Old 09-04-2008, 12:51 AM   #22
djjoshuad
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to further the OP's own metaphor and hopefully help him explain the difference...

You're building an OS that's designed for 32-bit on a 64-bit processor, yet you're worried about matching the family. Your 8-cyl car is running on 2 cylinders and you just want to be sure that the oil you put in comes from Chevy, not Ford. It's silly.

Family matching is great in that it enables all instruction sets that the family is capable of, but going back to the most recent relative to that family isn't a problem at all. Chances are that you won't find any new software that can use any of the new capabilities on that family until you move into the 64-bit world.
 
Old 09-05-2008, 12:23 AM   #23
Snarf53563
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Just hoping to configure my OS kernel so its tuned for the specific cpu it runs on.

For programming, I want to use CFLAGS: -mtune=native and -march=native
to help with source code portability, yet result in tuned object code wherever compiled.

Ideally, the kernel install process could use those CFLAGS ans save you the trouble;
but, it seems you need to research many hardware details to fine tune a kernel build.
 
Old 09-05-2008, 11:08 AM   #24
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snarf53563 View Post
Just hoping to configure my OS kernel so its tuned for the specific cpu it runs on.

For programming, I want to use CFLAGS: -mtune=native and -march=native
to help with source code portability, yet result in tuned object code wherever compiled.

Ideally, the kernel install process could use those CFLAGS ans save you the trouble;
but, it seems you need to research many hardware details to fine tune a kernel build.
As sated before you might want to do something of the sort but the limitation is that the processor set is newer. Therefore instructions within the newer set would not be implemented. You may want something but that cannot be done without a lot of effort on your part.

Anytime you create a new kernel you should be fully aware of the platform hardware and needs of the system.

That's why Intel, AMD must provide backwards compatibility to suit the processor within an existing operational platform. If they don't then the means to be used must be developed. Cross compiling is not always effective without tweaking or rewriting.

There are RISC that are developed for the speed, uniqueness but the cost for specialty exceeds what the consumer could nor should support.
 
  


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