LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Hardware
User Name
Password
Linux - Hardware This forum is for Hardware issues.
Having trouble installing a piece of hardware? Want to know if that peripheral is compatible with Linux?

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 10-22-2008, 10:15 AM   #1
taylorkh
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: North Carolina
Distribution: CentOS 6, CentOS 7 (with Mate), Ubuntu 16.04 Mate
Posts: 2,005

Rep: Reputation: 165Reputation: 165
How to determine region code of DVD drive?


The subject about says it all. I am running Ubuntu 8.04 on a Dell PC with an NEC Optiarc DVD drive (which I installed after purchase of the PC). In Windows I can examine the properties of the DVD drive and determine what region code (if any) the drive is set to and change the region code if needed.

How can I do this in Ubuntu?

Thanks,

Ken
 
Old 10-22-2008, 10:36 AM   #2
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 741Reputation: 741Reputation: 741Reputation: 741Reputation: 741Reputation: 741Reputation: 741
I'll bite---what is the "region code"?

Does this give any useful info?
dmesg|grep CD
 
Old 10-22-2008, 10:40 AM   #3
Total-MAdMaN
Member
 
Registered: May 2008
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 306

Rep: Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany View Post
I'll bite---what is the "region code"?
The region code is what determines what region's DVDs you can play using that DVD player. See here for more details.

DeCSS ignores the region code, so Linux uses don't need to worry about which region their DVDs come from.
 
Old 10-22-2008, 12:14 PM   #4
tredegar
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Debian "Testing"
Posts: 6,116

Rep: Reputation: 416Reputation: 416Reputation: 416Reputation: 416Reputation: 416
Quote:
How can I do this in Ubuntu?
Try installing regionset
 
Old 10-22-2008, 12:47 PM   #5
knudfl
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2008
Location: Copenhagen DK
Distribution: PCLinuxOS2020 CentOS6.10 CentOS7.7 + 50+ other Linux OS, for test only.
Posts: 17,385

Rep: Reputation: 3601Reputation: 3601Reputation: 3601Reputation: 3601Reputation: 3601Reputation: 3601Reputation: 3601Reputation: 3601Reputation: 3601Reputation: 3601Reputation: 3601
http://linvdr.org/projects/regionset/

Usually the region code can be changed a couple of
times ( max 3 times for the drives I know )
Then the drive is locked to use only "the last setting"

Regards
 
Old 10-22-2008, 01:58 PM   #6
taylorkh
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: North Carolina
Distribution: CentOS 6, CentOS 7 (with Mate), Ubuntu 16.04 Mate
Posts: 2,005

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 165Reputation: 165
Thanks! I will give regionset a try. I am aware of the limitations re. changing the region. I only want to see if a region is set or not. I have another drive of the same model in an XP machine and it has not been selected to a region. I can burn a copy of a double layer DVD OK however, it often cannot read it after burning. The drive in the Ubuntu machine can read the disk in question so I though I would see if a region had ever been set on that drive.

Thanks again!

Ken
 
Old 10-23-2008, 03:14 AM   #7
H_TeXMeX_H
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: $RANDOM
Distribution: slackware64
Posts: 12,928
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 1292Reputation: 1292Reputation: 1292Reputation: 1292Reputation: 1292Reputation: 1292Reputation: 1292Reputation: 1292Reputation: 1292
Maybe you should try flashing an RPC1 firmware to make it region-free. It is dangerous, but if you watch a lot of movies using the drive (and don't want to rip the VOBs) then it might be worth the risk.
 
Old 10-23-2008, 09:42 AM   #8
taylorkh
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: North Carolina
Distribution: CentOS 6, CentOS 7 (with Mate), Ubuntu 16.04 Mate
Posts: 2,005

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 165Reputation: 165
Thanks folks! I have confirmed that the NEC/Optiarc drive in my Ubuntu box is Region Code 1 (and has 4 changes available). The old Mad Dog in my multi boot test box is also Region 1. Both of those will read double layer DVDs written in my XP box with an NEC/Optiarc which has not had the region code set - and will sometimes not read the double layer disks it has written.

I do not know what all this means. I will probably put it down to a hardware issue with the offending drive. I purchased 2 of them a couple of years ago and made 3 returns under warranty. I guess at $29 each a couple of issues are part of the price :-)

Ken
 
Old 10-31-2008, 07:30 AM   #9
cgtueno
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Posts: 363

Rep: Reputation: 50
October 31,2008

With the passing of time, and level of use, the laser in an optical drive can degrade.
This results in write and read errors.

The quality of your writable media is also a factor, as is the cleanliness of the lens assembly in the drive.

There are calibration CDs and DVDs about which you can use to determine read accuracy.
Cleaning kits also exist.

As a rule I have found that it is often better to retire optical drives when they exhibit possible write errors, and replace them. In the end it often saves quite a lot of valuable time (usually spent testing, swearing, and barking knuckles).

There may, of course, be other factors affecting you ability to consistently write to optical media. Such factors could include: buffer under-runs, buggy drive firmware, other processes clocking up CPU time and delaying the continuous data transfer process, bus contention (ensure that the optical drive and any HDDs are on separate channels), poor electrical connections, unstable power supply voltages, damaged data cables, and buggy drivers and application software.

At a pinch I suggest that you systematically check the situation by replacing the data cable (the cables can often be damaged without the damage being easily seen), and perform test write and reads repeatedly, with a minimum of processes running on the machine (to reduce CPU and bus contention, etc). Alternatively swapping the drive into another machine and re-testing is also a suggestion, that would eliminate possible "other" hardware complications.

Also check the optical drive manufacturer's site for a firmware update.
I don't recommend updating the firmware unless absolutely necessary; given that a failed firmware upgrade could convert the device from a drive to an expensive "brick" with the greatest of ease.

I also recommend that you examine the hardware health of the PC as well.
If the system is heavily loaded by a large number of devices then the power supply voltage rails may exhibit voltage instability when the optical drive pulls extra current during the write process.

Lastly, make sure that the case has good airflow.
I have a nice DVD-RW drive that I was given as scrap. It was reported to produce write errors on a random basis (which I observed happening). The cause of the fault, it turned out, was simply lack of airflow around the drive which caused it to overheat (hot to the touch). Installing it in another machine with good airflow and bingo - a rock solid reliable drive

Hope some of that helps

Regards

Chris

PS. Replacing the data cable sounds daft, but you would be surprised how often drive cabling is at fault.
 
Old 11-01-2008, 09:24 AM   #10
taylorkh
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: North Carolina
Distribution: CentOS 6, CentOS 7 (with Mate), Ubuntu 16.04 Mate
Posts: 2,005

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 165Reputation: 165
Thanks Chris. I have experienced hard drive issues from a bad data cable - hardly the first thing which comes to mind to check. The DVD drive in question has burned hundreds of single layer DVDs and CDs with very few problem. The only issues have come with the double layer DVDs - and when I use Memorex media (about $.40 each) vs. Verbatim media (about $1.50 each). Perhaps that has something to do with it.

Ken
 
Old 11-02-2008, 12:23 AM   #11
cgtueno
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Posts: 363

Rep: Reputation: 50
November 02, 2008

Hi Ken



It could be that the laser in the drive is marginal if it is only occurring with double layer media.
If there is even the slightest difference in the refractive index of plastic used in the two brands, and the laser is marginal, then that might explain why one brand seems to reliably whilst the other doesn't work.

I suggest that you shoot an email to the customer service group at Memorex, and let them know the details, eg your DVD drive model, and the Memorex media details (product code, batch number (if printed on the bottom of the box, etc), where purchased, and date of purchase.

Ask for their advice.
Most of the manufactures are very happy to be notified of problems.
Media batch manufacture problems are not unknown, and it has been my experience (with floppy disk, CD-R, CD-RW media, etc) that the manufacturers are usually happy to check their records for reported problems (yes even for old media).

Ask them to mail you a couple of (free) samples of their current stock to allow you to determine if it's the batch you bought that is faulty or your DVD.

Ask them if there is a burning diagnostic program that you can download and burn an ISO test image to disc and mail it back to them for their QA inspection. Or alternatively if they would like you to mail a blank disc to them for analysis. (Note: When manufactured, batches of media are tested with a very very very expensive media analyzer machine for QA).

Also check out their www site to see if your drive has been listed as a known problem, or requires a recommended firmware upgrade; and also check out the drive manufacturer's site for the same.

During my career I found that if you approach media manufacturers the right way about possible problems with their products, then more often than not they are only too happy to have a chat and see if they can help.

Oh. Also check out some of the "media" media reviews (surf the www and you will find them), you will often find quality comments from independent batch testing of different manufacturer's media products.

A long time back (he scratches at his beard) there were a lot of problems with CD-R media batches from different manufacturers. One of the magazines here did a feature story - they got hold of an industrial media analyzer and tested batches different manufacturer's products that they purchased. The results were very interesting. I think that the magazine was Australian Personal Computer (But I'm not sure - it was a long time back).

Unit price isn't always a reliable indicator of quality (often it is - it reflects the QA on the plastics, etc).

Wishing you luck

Chris

PS. Yep cables can be a real pain when fault finding. Hairline cracks that open up and open circuit tracks on PCB (as the device warms up) are worse though - lol
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[SOLVED] How to switch DVD drive region code within Linux? kaz2100 Linux - General 11 07-13-2008 03:24 AM
Removing region code from a DVD copy? neilgunton Linux - Desktop 5 01-28-2008 05:10 AM
How to determine if my DVD player is Region Free? General Linux - Hardware 1 07-09-2006 05:13 PM
Copying a DVD and changing the region code kenkajoto Linux - Software 4 03-19-2006 03:27 AM
DVD region code problem SGFHK321 Linux - General 3 07-12-2004 02:55 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Hardware

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:12 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration