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-   -   How do I know my optical drive is an SCSI generic device? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/showthread.php?t=4175435565)

stf92 11-04-2012 09:12 AM

How do I know my optical drive is an SCSI generic device?
 
What's asked.

jefro 11-04-2012 10:01 AM

Kind of a trick question. Most modern linux view storage by using scsi access. That doesn't mean the real physical access is scsi. For that you'd need a scsi adapter and a scsi optical drive. That is not unheard of but kind of rare.

I suspect you have some sata drive or even ide that is simply being accessed by linux as a scsi device.

camorri 11-04-2012 10:09 AM

Just a suggestion, install the app lshw with the GTK front end. It does a nice job of listing hardware.

My optical drive is IDE, and linux sees it as scsi.

cascade9 11-04-2012 10:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stf92 (Post 4821925)
How do I know my optical drive is an SCSI generic device?

Eyeballs! Its the only way to be sure.

Quote:

Originally Posted by jefro (Post 4821952)
That doesn't mean the real physical access is scsi. For that you'd need a scsi adapter and a scsi optical drive. That is not unheard of but kind of rare.

Eyeballs! Its the only way to be sure. I know a techie who got badly cuaght out by IDE on SCSI (a couple of 'ACard IDE to SCSI Adapters' IIRC).

stf92 11-04-2012 10:48 AM

I ask because of the following (man page):


Code:

DESCRIPTION
      cdcd  allows  control of a CD player either directly off of the command
      line or in its own interactive query mode.  Invoking  cdcd  without  a
      command will cause cdcd to enter query mode.  Invoking cdcd with a com-
      mand will cause cdcd to execute that command and then terminate when it
      is finished.

OPTIONS
      --device DEVICE

      -d DEVICE
              Use  DEVICE as the CD device.  DEVICE is the device special file
              name of the CD-ROM device.  Do not  use  a  Linux  SCSI  Generic
              device.


David the H. 11-04-2012 01:24 PM

Actually, I believe that's really saying not to use generic scsi device addresses, the kind that use major and minor numbers. Only use the standard /dev/sr* style device entries.

It used to be common for some cd-rom drive controlling programs to require direct device addressing, but that's rarely needed any more.

stf92 11-04-2012 05:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by David the H. (Post 4822080)
Actually, I believe that's really saying not to use generic scsi device addresses, the kind that use major and minor numbers. Only use the standard /dev/sr* style device entries.

It used to be common for some cd-rom drive controlling programs to require direct device addressing, but that's rarely needed any more.

I still use cdrecord thus: cdrecord <some_parameters> dev=1001,0,0 <some_other_parameters>. If I address the device as, say, /dev/hdc, then it complains, although accepts it anyways. Is this what you mean? Although in cdrecord syntax 1001,0,0 are scsibus, target, lun.

jefro 11-05-2012 02:50 PM

Nothing to do with eyes. Use lsmod | grep sg

cascade9 11-06-2012 03:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jefro (Post 4822877)
Nothing to do with eyes.

If you have IDE HDDs or CD/DVDs drives being run on a SCSI controller, it appears to be a SCSI drive with all the hardware tools I tried.

I havent tried checking with linux hardware tools. If I had a IDE to SCSI Adapter or 5 I've give it a shot.


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