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Old 11-13-2003, 06:25 PM   #16
radiomouse17
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i appreciate all that you are doing for me

i cant believe how helpful this forum actually is

thanks
 
Old 11-13-2003, 09:27 PM   #17
SiriusAB
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I'm confused. Did we resolve the hardware question?

From the Dell website:

It's either a --
1.) Integrated 5.1 Audio with Dolby® Digital 5.1 capability
2.) Optional: Sound Blaster® Live!TM 5.1 Digital Sound Card with Dolby® Digital 5.1 capability
3.) Optional: Sound Blaster® AudigyTM 2 Sound Card with DVD Audio and Dolby® Digital 5.1 capability

Presumably the first, since lspci produces the output it produced. The Dimension 4600 mobo is based off a i865PE chipset, but I couldn't identify the exact component Dell uses in the box. I found Epox and Abit boards based off the chipset, both of which featured integrated sound. The Intel version has this reference:

http://www.hardwarezone.com/articles...aid=688&page=3
"A common feature found in a lot of Intel desktop boards would be the on-board audio codec. Using the Analog Devices' AD1985 audio codec, the board is equipped with 5.1-channels of surround audio capabilities. All the analog output ports have been made available at the rear I/O deck and even S/PDIF digital coaxial and optical connections were also integrated at the rear panel. What's good about the AD1985 is its unmistakeably rich software bundle that's part of the SoundMax 4's features. Supporting a whole host of audio standards including EAX 1.0, EAX 2.0, Aureal A3D 1.0 and IA-SIG I3DL2, SoundMax also offer a 360-instrument Yamaha DLS by XG sound sample set that allows it to work like any standard MIDI playback device."

Anyway, ALSA appears to cover the item, both AD1980 and AD1985:
http://www.alsa-project.org/alsa-doc/

Lemme know if this helps!
 
Old 11-13-2003, 11:59 PM   #18
radiomouse17
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great! maybe this is what i need

but how do install these drivers on linux

thats the part i dont really get

like once i find a driver for my sound, how do i install on linux
 
Old 11-14-2003, 01:03 PM   #19
amos
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Hi radiomouse.

If you're sitting comfortably then we'll begin.

There are a number of ways of getting the alsa drivers but I would bet that you've already installed them. Open up the Install/Unistall manager (I think its in one of the menus) and enter alsa as a search term. The packages you apparently need are:

alsa-driver
alsa-lib
alsa-utils

As I'm not sure whether the kernel modules will be loaded automatically maybe you should remove them and get hold of the sources. Which would be

alsa-driver-0.9.8.tar.bz2 available here: ftp://ftp.alsa-project.org/pub/driver
alsa-lib-0.9.8.tar.bz2 available here: ftp://ftp.alsa-project.org/pub/lib
alsa-utils-0.9.8.tar.bz2 available here: ftp://ftp.alsa-project.org/pub/utils

If you have no internet connection on that machine or you will have problems getting these files onto the linux box then they may be available on magazine coverdisks.

You will see many files which end: xxxxx.tar.bz2 bz2 is a compression format (like Winzip in windows), tar comes from the acronym Tape ARchive I think, it basically packs a series of files into one file retaining there directory structure.

Similar files have the ending xxxxx.tar.gz or xxxxxxxx.tgz both of which are tar archives which have been compressed using gzip instead of bz2.

Files which end xxxxx.rpm are binary files which will install precompiled binaries onto your system. There are other package systems such as deb or one which uses tgz, but Mandrake use RPM.

Anyway you should go here:

http://www.alsa-project.org/alsa-doc...odule=intel8x0

and follow the instructions which are the ones designated for your card.

I have no time right now to do an in-depth walkthrough of what you will need to do. If you want to have a go on your own first then things to note are:

1. You will need to be SU (super user) to do the steps illustrated.

2. Where it says:

cp /downloads/alsa-*

substitute the path to the directory where you actually placed the files.

On mine this was:

/home/amos/downloads/alsa/

with alsa-* on the end.

3. If you treat:

./configure;make;make install

as three seperate commands:

./configure (press enter)

make (press enter)

make install (press enter)

You'll get on better.

Cheers
Amos
 
Old 11-14-2003, 04:50 PM   #20
radiomouse17
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this is what i got when i tried to configure the driver

[root@own30563rn root]# cd alsa
[root@own30563rn alsa]# ls
alsa-driver-0.9.8/ alsa-lib-0.9.8.tar.bz2
alsa-driver-0.9.8.tar alsa-utils-0.9.8.tar.bz2
[root@own30563rn alsa]# bunzip2 alsa-lib-0.9.8.tar.bz2
[root@own30563rn alsa]# tar alsa-lib-0.9.8.tar.bz2
tar: Old option `b' requires an argument.
Try `tar --help' for more information.
[root@own30563rn alsa]# tar -xf alsa-lib-0.9.8.tar.bz2
tar: alsa-lib-0.9.8.tar.bz2: Cannot open: No such file or directory
tar: Error is not recoverable: exiting now
[root@own30563rn alsa]# ls
alsa-driver-0.9.8/ alsa-lib-0.9.8.tar
alsa-driver-0.9.8.tar alsa-utils-0.9.8.tar.bz2
[root@own30563rn alsa]# cd -xf alsa-lib-0.9.8.tar.bz2
bash: cd: -x: invalid option
cd: usage: cd [-L|-P] [dir]
[root@own30563rn alsa]# cd alsa-driver-0.9.8/
[root@own30563rn alsa-driver-0.9.8]# ./configure --with-cards=intel8x --with-sequencer=yes;make;make install
checking for gcc... no
checking for cc... no
checking for cc... no
checking for cl... no
configure: error: no acceptable cc found in $PATH
make all-deps
make[1]: Entering directory `/root/alsa/alsa-driver-0.9.8'
make[1]: Nothing to be done for `all-deps'.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/root/alsa/alsa-driver-0.9.8'

Please, run the configure script as first...

rm -f /snd*.o /persist.o /isapnp.o
make[1]: Entering directory `/root/alsa/alsa-driver-0.9.8/support'
Makefile:9: ../Makefile.conf: No such file or directory
Makefile:27: /Rules.make: No such file or directory
make[1]: *** No rule to make target `/Rules.make'. Stop.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/root/alsa/alsa-driver-0.9.8/support'
make: *** [install-modules] Error 1
[root@own30563rn alsa-driver-0.9.8]#
 
Old 11-14-2003, 07:24 PM   #21
amos
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It seems to be saying that gcc isn't installed. Please type:

whereis gcc

at your shell prompt, if all you get is:

gcc:

then we're buggered.

Cheers
Amos

PS Have drunk copious amounts of alcohol. Please excuse serious negativity!
 
Old 11-16-2003, 11:54 AM   #22
amos
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Right, have looked again at the output above.

We'll start from scratch get rid of all of the files in /usr/src/alsa and recopy them over, you should have three files

alsa-lib-0.9.8.tar.bz2
alsa-driver-0.9.8.tar.bz2
alsa-utils-0.9.8.tar.bz2

we'll start with alsa-driver-0.9.8.tar.bz2

If we type the following

bunzip2 alsa-driver-0.9.8.tar.bz2

and then hit enter it will uncompress alsa-driver-0.9.8.tar.bz2 and leave us with a file called:

alsa-driver-0.98.tar

now if we type:

tar -xf alsa-driver-0.9.8.tar

it will extract the tar archive and should leave us with a directory called:

alsa-driver-0.9.8

I'm not on my linux box now so I can't check, but I can't remember whether these commands will delete the original files or not.

An alternative would be to start with:

alsa-driver-0.9.8.tar.bz2

and type

tar jxvf alsa-driver-0.9.8.tar.bz2

which should decompress the file and then un-tar the archive, this definitely doesn't remove the original file.

Alternatively if the original file ended xxxxxxxxxx.tar.gz or xxxxxxxxxx.tgz we could type:

tar zxvf xxxxxxxxxxx.tar.gz (Hopefully you know that the xxxxxxx... are shorthand for any filename you care to supply)

to decompress and extract the files.

I would find it highly unlikely that you haven't got gcc installed. Typing gcc in a shell will probably give you a response. If it doesn't then post back here and we'll see what we can do.

Cheers
Amos

Last edited by amos; 11-16-2003 at 11:57 AM.
 
Old 11-16-2003, 07:58 PM   #23
radiomouse17
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[root@own30563rn alsa]# whereis gcc
gcc:
[root@own30563rn alsa]# gcc
bash: gcc: command not found
[root@own30563rn alsa]#
 
Old 11-18-2003, 02:03 PM   #24
amos
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Can you open the "Install Software" program from one of the menus (the equivalent of Windows' Start Menu)? On Mandrake 9.0 it was divorced from the "Remove Software" program but they may have reamalgamated them. It might also be referred to as Package Manager, it used to have a red icon which was a picture of a box.

If you can open it then look for installed software called GCC, if its not there (installed) then try and install it (if you can work out how). The hardest it gets is that you have to make sure things are ticked/highlighted.

Cheers
Amos
 
Old 11-18-2003, 11:31 PM   #25
radiomouse17
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[root@own30563rn alsa-driver-0.9.8]# ./configure --with-cards=intel8x0 --with-sequencer=yes;make;make install
checking for gcc... gcc
checking for C compiler default output... a.out
checking whether the C compiler works... yes
checking whether we are cross compiling... no
checking for executable suffix...
checking for object suffix... o
checking whether we are using the GNU C compiler... yes
checking whether gcc accepts -g... yes
checking for ranlib... ranlib
checking for a BSD compatible install... /usr/bin/install -c
checking how to run the C preprocessor... gcc -E
checking for ANSI C header files... yes
checking for gcc option to accept ANSI C... none needed
checking for an ANSI C-conforming const... yes
checking for inline... inline
checking whether time.h and sys/time.h may both be included... yes
checking whether gcc needs -traditional... no
checking for current directory... /root/alsa/alsa-driver-0.9.8
checking cross compile...
checking for directory with kernel source... /usr/src/linux
checking for kernel version... The file /usr/src/linux/include/linux/version.h does not exist.
Please, install the package with full kernel sources for your distribution
or use --with-kernel=dir option to specify another directory with kernel
sources (default is /usr/src/linux).
make all-deps
make[1]: Entering directory `/root/alsa/alsa-driver-0.9.8'
make[1]: Nothing to be done for `all-deps'.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/root/alsa/alsa-driver-0.9.8'

Please, run the configure script as first...

rm -f /snd*.o /persist.o /isapnp.o
make[1]: Entering directory `/root/alsa/alsa-driver-0.9.8/support'
Makefile:9: ../Makefile.conf: No such file or directory
Makefile:27: /Rules.make: No such file or directory
make[1]: *** No rule to make target `/Rules.make'. Stop.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/root/alsa/alsa-driver-0.9.8/support'
make: *** [install-modules] Error 1


im so confused
 
Old 11-19-2003, 12:30 PM   #26
amos
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I take it you successfully installed gcc, judging by the output you posted. Do not type:

./configure --with-cards=intel8x0 --with-sequencer=yes;make;make install

as one line. The semi-colons ( ; ) separate the three commands, whenever we install software from source (often referred to as a tarball due to it being in files ending tar.gz or tar.bz2 or tgz) we go through three stages(usually done separately).

./configure

make

make install

Unless we are compiling as root or doing our compilation in a directory which requires root access (This is what we are doing as /usr/src requires root access privileges) we will probably have to become the Super User (root) to perform the third step.

THIS IS NOT THE PROBLEM.

The first step will produce a configuration script which tells the make program where everything is and makes sure that everything you need to compile the program is present.

Typing:

./configure --with-cards=intel8x0 --with-sequencer=yes

should give you the same ouput as above up to the point where it asks you to install the kernel sources. This is giving you an error because the alsa driver package requires information that is in the kernel sources.

The parts which read:

--with-cards=intel8x0 --with-sequencer=yes

are options you are passing to the configure script in order that it can then pass them to the make program.

Assuming you followed my previous advice about installing gcc using the package manager, reopen that program, find the package which contains the kernel sources (this is the source code of the linux kernel), and install it. It will almost certainly install in the /usr/src directory probably giving you a directory called linux-2.4.xx-mdkyy, where xx and yy are numbers which identify the versions which are installed. There may also be a link in the /usr/src directory called linux which points to the new directory.

Try just running:

./configure --with-cards=intel8x0 --with-sequencer=yes

in the alsa-driver-0.9.8 directory again.

If it appears to work then type

make

sit back while it compiles don't expect it to be too quick, depending on the version of gcc you installed, what cpu you have, how much ram you have or whether you were born under the sign of Capricorn etc, it could take anywhere from a few minutes to a few hours. Watch a film, cook a meal etc. If it returns you to the command prompt without giving you any obvious errors then its probably worked. Now type:

make install

which will install your programs in the place they're supposed to be (Normally we would have to become the Super User before performing this step).

If this works then see if you can follow the rest of the steps for installing the alsa-utils and lib packages, and then try to change /etc/modules.conf.

Didn't I tell you that you'd learn loads doing this.

The:

./configure
make
make install

dance is applicable almost every time you install software from source. I usually keep a directory in my home directory called downloads for compiling etc, so I'd usually do something like get a tarball called:

foo-1.2.3-tar.gz

copy it to

/home/amos/downloads

probably using konqueror to do this part, then open up a shell, which would be as a normal user and type:

cd downloads

(Your shell normally opens with its present directory set to your home directory)

ls

(This lists the contents of the present directory)

tar zxvf foo-1.2.3-tar.gz

(This extracts the file and unpacks it probably into a directory called foo-1.2.3)

In konqueror I'd probably then move or delete the tarball, and change into the foo-1.2.3 directory to check any README's or INSTALL files. Then shifting the focus back to the shell I'd type:

ls

(To check what exactly the directory was called)

cd foo-1.2.3

(To change into that directory)

./configure

(Assuming that the README and the INSTALL files suggested that the default configuration was fine, otherwise I'd have to add things like: --with-cards=intel8x0 --with-sequencer=yes, if you want a list of options for configure you can type ./configure --help if everything goes fine then I'd go on to the next step.)

make

(When this exits normally the next step is usually to install the programs we've just compiled. These will 9 times out of 10 need to go into directories which require root privileges to access, so at this point we become the Super User.)

make install

(If everything goes well, and we need to run our newly installed program from the command line then typing exit will return us to normal user status before we proceed.)

I hope this hasn't been too long winded for you and has cleared up some things. A useful resource for you will probably be RUTE which apparently stands for Rute User's Tutorial and Exposition. You can find it here:

http://www.linuxman.com.cy/rute/rute.html

Cheers
Amos

Last edited by amos; 11-19-2003 at 12:32 PM.
 
Old 11-22-2003, 07:46 AM   #27
amos
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You haven't given up have you?

Cheers
Amos
 
  


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