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Old 12-28-2007, 08:43 PM   #1
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fstab + hardware = small puzzle


Hi all,

I am configuring my new MEPIS 7.0 system. I am trying to get the system to recognize my dvdburner (hdc) and dvdreader (hdd).

Normally (in prior MEPIS) I put the following in fstab - static:

/dev/hdc /mnt/dvdburner udf,iso9660 noauto,users,dev,ro 0 0
/dev/hdd /mnt/dvdreader udf,iso9660 noauto,users,dev,ro 0 0

I did that and su to console and successfully made directories. However, after reboot I tried to mount but the system said:

"special device /dev/hdc does not exist"
"special device /dev/hdd does not exist"

Now, in the fstab - dynamic I noticed the following:

/dev/cdrom /media/cdrom udf,iso9660 noauto,users,exec,ro 0 0
/dev/scd0 /media/cdrom udf,iso9660 noauto,users,exec,ro 0 0
/dev/cdrom1 /media/cdrom1 udf,iso9660 noauto,users,exec,ro 0 0
/dev/scd1 /media/cdrom1 udf,iso9660 noauto,users,exec,ro 0 0

In console I could successfully mount:

/dev/cdrom
and
/dev/cdrom1

I didn't bother with scd0 and scd1 and don't know what they are. Still, the mounting seemed to work fine, so I am a bit puzzled.

QUESTION 01: Why wouldn't my system recognize my earlier method which had worked in early versions of this distro?
QUESTION 02: What is the difference between:

"udf,iso9660 noauto,users,dev,ro 0 0"
and
"udf,iso9660 noauto,users,exec,ro 0 0"
 
Old 12-28-2007, 08:51 PM   #2
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I remember a while back there were some serious issues with the way that the Linux Kernel handled DVD writers. I think that this new standard has something to do with addressing that, however, I can't shed much more light on that.

Sadly I now no longer have time to keep up to date on all the latest kernel issues, I just have to let my package manager patch them all for me
 
Old 12-28-2007, 09:31 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzzyworm View Post
I remember a while back there were some serious issues with the way that the Linux Kernel handled DVD writers. I think that this new standard has something to do with addressing that, however, I can't shed much more light on that.

Sadly I now no longer have time to keep up to date on all the latest kernel issues, I just have to let my package manager patch them all for me

It is a new DVD burner. However, I never had trouble with my old DVD burner. Again, it seems to work using the 2nd approach - as listed in the fstab - dynamic document.

Just curious if anyone knew why and if anyone knew what the difference between the "dev" and the "exec" were.
 
Old 12-29-2007, 12:08 AM   #4
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The newer kernels use the sdX format for everything(sata and pata) and have dropped the hdX format. The hdX format was a hack to do pata and was not originally meant to be long term (it just worked out that way). The idea is to bring everything into one format so we do not need specialized tools for each type of drive. There are "issues" with certain chipsets (Nvidia for one) where the actual transfer speeds (as opposed to hdparm test) show a significant speed drop (40% plus) on pata drives. Unfortunately we are back to the usual situation where the manufactures will not develop a driver and they will not release the specs(sitting on thumbs).

Just another reason to go pure sata.

Good Luck
Lazlow
 
Old 12-29-2007, 01:34 PM   #5
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2 followup questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by lazlow View Post
The newer kernels use the sdX format for everything(sata and pata) and have dropped the hdX format. The hdX format was a hack to do pata and was not originally meant to be long term (it just worked out that way). The idea is to bring everything into one format so we do not need specialized tools for each type of drive. There are "issues" with certain chipsets (Nvidia for one) where the actual transfer speeds (as opposed to hdparm test) show a significant speed drop (40% plus) on pata drives. Unfortunately we are back to the usual situation where the manufactures will not develop a driver and they will not release the specs(sitting on thumbs).

Just another reason to go pure sata.

Good Luck
Lazlow

1) So when I edit fstab or write in console, I should use "sdX" instead of "hdX", correct?

2) What is "pata"? I know what sata is (referring to hdd, I assume). My hdd use the old master / slave set-up and so do my dvdburner / dvdreader.
 
Old 12-29-2007, 01:56 PM   #6
lazlow
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Basically ide is pata.

Yes, use sdX. The stuff is still in flux so the order can SOMETIMES change. Your pata disk can show up as sda or some other sdX. I have seen setups where a sata was added to a existing pata setup and the pata drive went from sda to sdb (which can raise a lot of hate and discontent in a system). I have also seen kernel updates flop the drive order (major PITA). The initial change over to sdX was in June of 07(?) I suspect as we approach the anniversary things will be more stable (at least as far as drive flopping).
 
Old 12-29-2007, 04:25 PM   #7
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Thanks lazlow. By chance would you (or anyone else reading) know the difference between:

1) "udf,iso9660 noauto,users,dev,ro 0 0"
2) "udf,iso9660 noauto,users,exec,ro 0 0"

Thanks again.
 
  


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