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Old 10-13-2004, 12:05 PM   #1
webwolf70
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DSL(Broadband) Problems


I just got Frontier DSL. I am using a Speed Stream 5200 Ethernet/USB ADSL modem. it works fine. I have it connected to my Ethernet card. My connection max is 1/MBS. I have run several speed tests But......

Now I understand The server is the wild card. Just becuase I can download a megabyte a second doesn't mean that the server can keep up. But When I had Verizon DSL my max was 185/KBS and that is what I usually downloaded at. Now the problem I am having now is that my max download speed is only 150/kbs no matter what I download. I have tried dozens of different ftp/http sites. Small files and large alike. So I am thinking that I may need to tweak something on my computer. I am using a Compaq Presario with 512 MB of memory and an AMD Athalon XP 2800+. I have 512 L2 Cache also. Mandrake 10.0 Official. This is the same computer and OS I used with Verizon.

I need help and suggestions on what to do, or how to do it or where to find the right info to help me.

Thanks


Webwolf

Last edited by webwolf70; 10-13-2004 at 12:08 PM.
 
Old 10-13-2004, 01:03 PM   #2
J.W.
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I'd call your ISP first, and ask them what kind of download speed you should be seeing; it's entirely possible that 150Kbs is the top speed that they offer. Given that you've got a working connection, running at a respectable speed (150Kbs isn't bad) and your hardware is rated for even higher speeds, it seems that the most likely factor for any slowness would be that your ISP is simply not pumping the data down the wire any faster than 150Kbs. It may be that if you want faster speeds, you would need to upgrade your service. I don't know what your monthly DSL bill is, but if you're getting 150Kbs for, say $40/month, you may need to select a more expensive plan to get higher speeds.

Either way, the first thing I'd do would be to call your ISP. I would not mess with the computer at this point. As they say, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Good luck with it -- J.W.
 
Old 10-13-2004, 01:47 PM   #3
webwolf70
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Quote:
Originally posted by J.W.
I'd call your ISP first, and ask them what kind of download speed you should be seeing; it's entirely possible that 150Kbs is the top speed that they offer. Given that you've got a working connection, running at a respectable speed (150Kbs isn't bad) and your hardware is rated for even higher speeds, it seems that the most likely factor for any slowness would be that your ISP is simply not pumping the data down the wire any faster than 150Kbs. It may be that if you want faster speeds, you would need to upgrade your service. I don't know what your monthly DSL bill is, but if you're getting 150Kbs for, say $40/month, you may need to select a more expensive plan to get higher speeds.

Either way, the first thing I'd do would be to call your ISP. I would not mess with the computer at this point. As they say, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Good luck with it -- J.W.


Thats what I did a few times already. I called back and asked them again and this is what they told me, keep in mind that I have tried a few online speed tests and they all say roughly between 800 KB/sec to 1000 KB /sec download and 213 KB /sec upload.

The man I talked to said that in both Windows XP and Linux you have two kb. What I mean is that if you are downloading at 5.0 kb /sec and 5.0 KB /sec that the first is 5.0 kb /sec but the second one is upper case KB and means 50 kb /sec. lower case(kb) and upper case(KB) means different download sizes. Another example is if it says I am downloading 85.0 KB /sec that it is actually 850 kilobytes a second. Does this sound right to anyone?

I am not sure If I explained that right or if that is actually true. Anyone have any thoughts or info on this?


Thanks


Webwolf
 
Old 10-13-2004, 04:07 PM   #4
webwolf70
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OK, I think I am udnestanding this, though it makes no sense. First the lower case kb and upper case kb is bullshit. Either this person didn't know what he was talking about or was hoping I was a mindless Microsoft user who would believe anything. Or maybe it is true for really high connections, don't know.

I talked to Frontier Tech Support several times until I finally talked with someone who explained to me what was going on. This is it.

If you get 1 MB/sec download that means if you go to download something your transfer rate is 100 kb/sec. Which means you are downloading at 100 kb/sec, not 1 MB/sec. The man I talked to on the phone has a 5 MB/sec download but his tranfer rate is 500 kb/sec. I called some family who have a 3 mb/sec download time but there transfer rate is 300 kb/sec.

What doesn't make sense to me is this. If you have a 1 MB/sec download connection but you are only downloading at 100 kb/sec, then why do they even say 1 megabyte download. If you never go past 100 kb then should'nt it be a 100 Kilobyte connection???????????


If anyone knows the answer please explain, becuase right now it sounds more like false advertising then product fact.


Webwolf

Last edited by webwolf70; 10-13-2004 at 04:10 PM.
 
Old 10-13-2004, 04:59 PM   #5
michaelk
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Isn't that 1mb/s really bits/sec and not bytes/sec? So your download speed would be 125Kbytes/sec
 
Old 10-13-2004, 05:09 PM   #6
webwolf70
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Quote:
Originally posted by michaelk
Isn't that 1mb/s really bits/sec and not bytes/sec? So your download speed would be 125Kbytes/sec

Ok, I think I am starting to get this. So when they say 1 MB/sec they mean bits not bytes. So in reality they should be telling us megabits not megabytes. So if my download is 1 Megabit a second then it is actually 125 kilobytes a second download time(Dividing 1,000 bits by 8.). So If my upload is 211 Kilobits then it is 26.375 Kilobytes a second. Am I understanding this correctly now?


Webwolf
 
Old 10-13-2004, 10:56 PM   #7
teckk
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webwolf

I have a 1.5 Meg. DSL connection and regularly download at 160 kB (kilo bytes) per second. That is if the server supports it. Some FTP or Http don't support that bandwidth.

8 bits are usually considered a byte, but that does not include the stop bits, or check sum, end of the blocks. You should count on 10 bits per byte to calculate transfer speeds.

1Mb (mega bits) / 9 or 10 = 100- 110kB (kilo bytes) per second transfer rate.

If you have a 1Mbit connection you should be able to bring a stream in at 100- 120 kB (kilo bytes) per second. If the sever you are transferring from supports that speed.
 
Old 10-14-2004, 02:44 AM   #8
webwolf70
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Re: webwolf

Quote:
Originally posted by teckk
I have a 1.5 Meg. DSL connection and regularly download at 160 kB (kilo bytes) per second. That is if the server supports it. Some FTP or Http don't support that bandwidth.

8 bits are usually considered a byte, but that does not include the stop bits, or check sum, end of the blocks. You should count on 10 bits per byte to calculate transfer speeds.

1Mb (mega bits) / 9 or 10 = 100- 110kB (kilo bytes) per second transfer rate.

If you have a 1Mbit connection you should be able to bring a stream in at 100- 120 kB (kilo bytes) per second. If the sever you are transferring from supports that speed.

Thanks. I see why I was confused at first. MB stands for Megabyte and Megabit. I wonder if that was what that guy was trying to explain, he just had it a bit mixed up. Maybe kb/mb is for kilobit/megabit and KB/MB is for Kilobyte/Megabyte. Makes sense, though I am probably one of the few who actually ask questions like this and want to know and understand why, lol.



Webwolf
 
  


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