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Old 07-03-2009, 09:40 PM   #1
SHENGTON
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Exclamation Does Power Supply, supply power? --> Need comments


I need comments for my article. Do you agree what I wrote or not? and Why?




The term power supply is a bit of a misnomer. Allow me to illustrate my arguments with the following:

Deep Well >> Water Pump >> Pressurized water Tank>>Gate valve >> Pipe >> Faucet

Now, Let the items i.e. water tank, Gate valve, pipe and faucet be a one (1) process called A_unit and let the Water pump be an action or a connector of the two (Deep well & A_Unit).

Now, which of the two units (Deep well and A_unit) supplies/provides water to the household to drink? When I say supplier/provider - that means without it there would be totally no water at all.

From the illustration above, without “A_unit” - Your household would be a mess.

The same with PSU, without PSU - your system will be toasted due to improper voltage supply (a mess in water illustration above) thus, PSU does not supply power but controls and regulates the power supply to avoid the mess.

A PC’s power supply does not actually supply any power. Just as with any electrical appliance, the power for a PC is supplied by the wall socket, which is connected to your local electrical grid., which is supplied electricity by a power company. What the power supply in a PC actually does is act as a step-down transformer. That means that it converts high-voltage alternating current into low-voltage direct current. Generally, a PC uses 12-volt current to power motors on devices like hard drives and CD-ROM drives, and 5-volt and 3.3-volt current to support onboard electronics.

Source (From my Blog site)
 
Old 07-03-2009, 10:39 PM   #2
Quakeboy02
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If you're going to try to redefine terms, your followers will have a difficult time in discussions with people who actually know this stuff. Power Supply is the proper term. Why not stick with it?
 
Old 07-04-2009, 12:41 AM   #3
nigelc
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Hmmm its not that simple.
Most modern pcs have switch mode psu.
The mains comes in depending on which country. It is then rectified i.s made into DC, then it has a high frequency superimposed on it. It goes through the transformer and is rectified again. Out
comes the different dc volts.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply
If it was not a switch mode power supply it would be huge. The power supply is the term that has been used for years and years whether is linear or switch mode or batteries.
 
Old 07-04-2009, 09:25 AM   #4
onebuck
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Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHENGTON View Post
I need comments for my article. Do you agree what I wrote or not? and Why?


The term power supply is a bit of a misnomer. Allow me to illustrate my arguments with the following:

Deep Well >> Water Pump >> Pressurized water Tank>>Gate valve >> Pipe >> Faucet

Now, Let the items i.e. water tank, Gate valve, pipe and faucet be a one (1) process called A_unit and let the Water pump be an action or a connector of the two (Deep well & A_Unit).

Now, which of the two units (Deep well and A_unit) supplies/provides water to the household to drink? When I say supplier/provider - that means without it there would be totally no water at all.

From the illustration above, without “A_unit” - Your household would be a mess.

The same with PSU, without PSU - your system will be toasted due to improper voltage supply (a mess in water illustration above) thus, PSU does not supply power but controls and regulates the power supply to avoid the mess.

A PC’s power supply does not actually supply any power. Just as with any electrical appliance, the power for a PC is supplied by the wall socket, which is connected to your local electrical grid., which is supplied electricity by a power company. What the power supply in a PC actually does is act as a step-down transformer. That means that it converts high-voltage alternating current into low-voltage direct current. Generally, a PC uses 12-volt current to power motors on devices like hard drives and CD-ROM drives, and 5-volt and 3.3-volt current to support onboard electronics.

Source (From my Blog site)
There are several holes to your explanation. If you are indeed re-defining and adhere to your definition. Then you could possibly get someone to pass the error ridden definitions that you are trying to pass.

Quote:
simple excerpt from 'What is power supply unit PSU?';

A PSU is a part of a computer that supplies power to the rest of the computer. A cord is plugged into the wall that leads to the Out side of the computer and is plugged into the PSU. The PSU then distributes the power through out the system internally, to hard drives, DVD/CD drives, floppy drives, GPU's, the motherboard and any other parts as well.
Simple but correct.

A modern computer PSU is generally a switched-mode power supply (SMPS) that will supply multi-rail source for the computer relative to the load requirements. The 'PSU' is not a step-down transformer but does utilize step down transformers in the first stages of each rail. You should read the above link for a good definition.
Big iron is expensive, both in cost and weight.
 
Old 07-04-2009, 10:46 AM   #5
business_kid
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As has been said, your explanation is flawed. That doesn't mean it will be an unsuccessful article - it will generate a significant negative postbag.

The illustration about the well simply doesn't fit. Don't treat readers as idiots by suggesting mains be put to the low voltage lines.

The power supply does actually convert power. But the designer called that part a power supply, because it provides the power your pc wants from the available sources (11. or 220V).

My advice: Resist the urge to publish until you have something useful to say. Grab a windows 7 beta and slag that. Suffer through a linux from scratch without any automated tools. Don't write <expletive deleted>
 
  


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