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Having trouble installing a piece of hardware? Want to know if that peripheral is compatible with Linux?

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Old 04-07-2013, 10:56 PM   #16
haertig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
Does it matter which slot?
Any slot it will fit in is fine. Smaller cards can be used in larger slots. But larger cards obviously will not fit into smaller slots. Generally, you put the card in the smallest slot it will fit in, just so you have the larger slots available for larger cards that actually need them. But you can always rearrange what is in what slot later, so basically, "put it anywhere it fits".

[edit]Wait, maybe you were talking about which PCI slot to install in (my response above was regarding the PCIe x1 and x16 slots). Regarding the standard PCI slots, you can install whatever you want into either one.[/edit]

Last edited by haertig; 04-07-2013 at 11:01 PM.
 
Old 04-07-2013, 10:59 PM   #17
haertig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
Which DIMM slot would I choose to put in additional RAM?
Check you motherboard manual (that link I provided) regarding memory installation. Some setups require you to install memory in pairs, others do not. There will be a maximum memory size that your motherboard can support. And you will need to buy the appropriate memory and speed. The manual will cover this.
 
Old 04-08-2013, 02:00 AM   #18
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
Tried to run lshw:
Code:
ztcoracat@:~$ su
Password: 
root@:/home/ztcoracat# lshw
bash: lshw: command not found
root@:/home/ztcoracat#
I would have got it, its a tiny program that can be useful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
I'm in a dual boot with Win's Xp maybe "System Information" will provide some information (a friend suggested looking) regarding the motherboard if not I'll just reboot to my fav distro-
No, it wont, but you can try. If XP system info was any good people wouldnt d/l CPU-Z and simialr programs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
I don't have a static kit so I will have to purchase one-
You dont 'need' an antistatic kit. I've worked on computer hardware for well over 15 years, and I've used one once.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
And the PCI 2.......is obviously where I'd place the new PCI Wireless adapter card I want to purchase- However:
Does it matter which slot?
PCI2 is a particular slot. Its the slot I'd probably use unless you have no video card installed (I always try to keep as much space as possible between cards, video cards inparticular as they can get quite hot).

Quote:
Originally Posted by haertig View Post
Any slot it will fit in is fine. Smaller cards can be used in larger slots. But larger cards obviously will not fit into smaller slots. Generally, you put the card in the smallest slot it will fit in, just so you have the larger slots available for larger cards that actually need them. But you can always rearrange what is in what slot later, so basically, "put it anywhere it fits".

[edit]Wait, maybe you were talking about which PCI slot to install in (my response above was regarding the PCIe x1 and x16 slots). Regarding the standard PCI slots, you can install whatever you want into either one.[/edit]
I wouldnt give Ztcoracat advice like this as its far more complex than just physical PCIe size.

Quote:
Originally Posted by haertig View Post
Check you motherboard manual (that link I provided) regarding memory installation. Some setups require you to install memory in pairs, others do not. There will be a maximum memory size that your motherboard can support. And you will need to buy the appropriate memory and speed. The manual will cover this.
I havent seen a motherobard that required memory installed in pair since the 90s. Its just not true of 99%+ of the motherboards avaible now and over the last few years.

What you would be think of haertig is dual channel memory, which is on pretty much everything from the last 5-7 years. You will only get single channel memory if you install odd numbers of RAM sticks.....but it will work.

No, the manual does NOT cover memory type or speed required. It just gives you a rather useless url.

Ztcoracat- you are doing things the hard way, and getting ahead of yourself as well.

Cheap advice- Opening a case will not cause any issues (apart from possibly breaking 'warranty seals' or stuff like that which dont matter). Dont trust software if you can check hardware. Dont race ahead- make sure you have the correct model number for your board, then check the manufacturers website for the technical specs. If you are going to use a forum for advice, including all relevant info is by far the best idea....

To use the current situation, you seem to want to put more RAM in as well as install a wireless card. Well, maybe you can, maybe you cant. We need to know the exact motherboard model (dont trust MS-XXXX numbers, I've seen them be wrong in the past.....which is one reason why I always check with eyeballs). Also-
how much RAM you already have installed, how those sticks are laid out (e.g 2 x 2GB or 4 x 1GB), current RAM speed....
 
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Old 04-08-2013, 12:08 PM   #19
Ztcoracat
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Quote:
You dont 'need' an antistatic kit. I've worked on computer hardware for well over 15 years, and I've used one once.
Thanks for the confirmation on that.

Quote:
Dont race ahead- make sure you have the correct model number for your board,
Got it; I need to be certain and from what I am learning from you the only sure way is to open the case.

Here's what the manufacturer that made my system put in an illustration.
This is my exact tower. I'm going to give them a call if I have trouble opening the case-
ZT Systems
http://www.ztsystems.com/Default.aspx?tabid=1461

Quote:
dont trust MS-XXXX numbers, I've seen them be wrong in the past.....which is one reason why I always check with eyeballs).
I know wise council when I hear it-
Heed taken-

I have a large wood table to clear off that I plan on using to put the tower on.
It's covered with wrapping paper but that shouldn't matter; right-
And the floor is solid wood so no carpet to generate any static charge-
Is there anything else I need to keep in mind once that case is open and all the hardware is exposed?

Never done this before and I have to trust you cascade as I do not have any other help.
(a friend has offered to help but he's never cracked open a case either)
Unless I want to pay a tech and that can get pretty pricey--
 
Old 04-08-2013, 01:08 PM   #20
haertig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
Is there anything else I need to keep in mind once that case is open and all the hardware is exposed?
If you decide to not purchase/use a static kit, at least keep one hand in firm contact with the metal frame of your computer. And remove your shoes and socks. I would consider working on a computer without static protection and not damaging sensitive components to be more luck than anything else. Static can totally destroy a component on the first zap. But more likely is that it causes deterioration of components that you may not notice right away. Or you may blame a failure months/years down the road on a bad component when it was actually perpetuated by static damage over time. I have been in electronic manufacturing for years and I know all about static. Just because you appear to have dodged the bullet not using protection, does not mean that you actually have. But the choice is of course yours.
 
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Old 04-08-2013, 01:32 PM   #21
Ztcoracat
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Thanks, haertig--

I will err on the side of caution and use a static kit to be on the safe side.
I'd rather be safe than sorry.

I wouldn't want to build a new system or have to purchase a new Desktop.

Quote:
But more likely is that it causes deterioration of components that you may not notice right away.
Didn't know that could happen:-

Taking my time with this and sitting back and thinking now before I do anything-
 
Old 04-10-2013, 11:23 PM   #22
Ztcoracat
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Update:

I'm not an expert with wireless but my WUSB54gc Linksys USB Adapter that communicates with my wireless modem down the hall is failing. For the last 3-5 weeks I have been online and suddenly loose my internet connection.
I grew tired of that and went to the computer store today.

I purchased a Netis WF-2113 300 Mbps Wireless-N PCI-E Adapter for my Desktop today.
http://www.microcenter.com/product/3...chable_Antenna

I took a picture of my motherboard with me to show the tech what I have.
The tech that builds Desktops took me to the side, opened a tower and personally showed me where and how to install the card.

Before leaving I asked a Manager that if I can not install it correctly or if I do successfully install it and it doesn't work could I bring it back. The Manager confirmed yes I can bring the PCI card back but within 30 days.

The Computer Tech confirmed that if I can not install the card correctly they could for a fee.
He also confirmed that there is a disc in the box with drivers on it.
I hope the driver works for Debian as that is my primary OS on the Desktop.
I only use Win's XP once every few months-



Cascade and Haertig:

I have taken heed to what you both have taught me; Thank You!

Still a tad nervous to proceed. However, I need to proceed as the connection keeps failing and I can't have that:-

I've planned a day (maybe Tuesday) next week to install the card.

Last edited by Ztcoracat; 04-10-2013 at 11:24 PM.
 
Old 04-11-2013, 09:17 AM   #23
rknichols
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
I purchased a Netis WF-2113 300 Mbps Wireless-N PCI-E Adapter for my Desktop today.
http://www.microcenter.com/product/3...chable_Antenna
The datasheet from Netis lists Linux as a compatible OS, but on newegg.com, one of the reviews says that card has, "Poor Linux compatibility."
 
Old 04-11-2013, 01:10 PM   #24
haertig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
...my WUSB54gc Linksys USB Adapter that communicates with my wireless modem down the hall is failing. For the last 3-5 weeks I have been online and suddenly loose my internet connection.
Could be the network adapter, could be your router, could just be that there is interference on the channel your router is set to - change the channel on the router and everything may be fine. Did your neighbor possibly just buy a router and has it set to the same channel? Did your neighbor just get into HAM radio and set up a gigantic antenna array with a high power transmitter? Do you have other computers in your house that stay solidly connected to wireless? What if you move that USB adapter to another computer, does it work OK there? How is the signal strength reading at the computer where you are having issues? Once your connectivity drops, does it automatically reconnect? What do you do to get it working again? Not enough information to determine the cause of your wifi connectivity problems.

If the WiFi card that you just bought comes with drivers, no doubt those are drivers for Windows, not for Linux. Chances are you can find something in Linux that will support your new card, but it probably won't come from the manufacturer of the card though.
 
Old 04-11-2013, 01:18 PM   #25
haertig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rknichols View Post
but on newegg.com, one of the reviews says that card has, "Poor Linux compatibility."
I wouldn't get frightened about that just yet. Many reviewers are not intellectual giants, so you can never assume a review is accurate. This particular reviewer simply says "poor Linux compatability" with no more details than that. So initially, I don't give much credibility to his review. A decent reviewer and a knowledgeable Linux person would have most likely told you why.
 
Old 04-11-2013, 05:27 PM   #26
Ztcoracat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haertig View Post
Could be the network adapter, could be your router, could just be that there is interference on the channel your router is set to - change the channel on the router and everything may be fine. Did your neighbor possibly just buy a router and has it set to the same channel? Did your neighbor just get into HAM radio and set up a gigantic antenna array with a high power transmitter? Do you have other computers in your house that stay solidly connected to wireless? What if you move that USB adapter to another computer, does it work OK there? How is the signal strength reading at the computer where you are having issues? Once your connectivity drops, does it automatically reconnect? What do you do to get it working again? Not enough information to determine the cause of your wifi connectivity problems.

If the WiFi card that you just bought comes with drivers, no doubt those are drivers for Windows, not for Linux. Chances are you can find something in Linux that will support your new card, but it probably won't come from the manufacturer of the card though.


Not sure about my neighbor (router?) but his/her wireless connections shows in my Network Manager when I look.

Yes, I have 2 other computers in my house that stay connected to the wireless connection via the internal card that's in them and the wireless modem is good. I don't have a router--

The signal strength to the Desktop that I am using that adapter with is 97% but that fluctuates all the time on and off. All four bars that show my connection are not always colored in sometimes only 2 bars.
To get it working again I have to re-boot Debian after the 'Authentication For Wireless' and the password is typed in 3 times. After the 3rd try sometimes it re-connects and sometimes I have to re-boot--

I'll start looking for a Linux driver today or tomorrow for the card.
Not sure what to Google but I'm not giving up yet-
 
Old 04-11-2013, 05:32 PM   #27
Ztcoracat
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BTW, that Linksys adapter is about 3-4 years old and maybe age is why it's failing.

My laptop is in the same room as the Desktop and it never looses the wireless connection.

The Toshiba laptop down the hall in the other room never losses it's wireless connection and my Sony Playstation stays online w/o fail as well.

The Tech mentioned in passing that he just recently suggested this exact same card for another customer running Linux and that Linux user has not complained to the Tech as of yet-

I'm thinking it can't hurt to install the new wireless PCI card.
Worse case; it doesn't work and I get a full refund from Micro Center:-

Last edited by Ztcoracat; 04-11-2013 at 05:35 PM.
 
Old 04-12-2013, 01:15 AM   #28
haertig
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Agreed. With the additional info you provided, I'd say the USB WiFi adapter is the most likely culpret.
 
Old 04-12-2013, 06:51 PM   #29
Ztcoracat
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I'll install the card next week and let you know how it goes.

Hope I can find a Linux driver for it--

Code:
ztcoracat@:~$ uname -a
Linux mock 2.6.32-5-amd64 #1 SMP Mon Feb 25 00:26:11 UTC 2013 x86_64 GNU/Linux
ztcoracat@:~$
I think this one of these is the right one for the version of the kernel I'm running.
Quote:

Realtek RTL8192DE-VC Wireless LAN Adapter Linux Driver for kernel 2.6.24 (and later, up to 3.2.x),
http://www.wireless-driver.com/realt...r000512302011/
Or this is the right driver:
2.6 kernel:
Fedora Core, Debian, Mandriva, Open SUSE, Gentoo,

http://www.wireless-driver.com/realt...river-ver0019/

Driver's aren't easy to find or at least it's a tad confusing--
 
Old 04-12-2013, 07:26 PM   #30
Ztcoracat
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Scratch that last post.
I found the driver.
It's a zip sitting in my Downloads folder-
Quote:
netis AD-1103
Driver v1.0 for Linux.zip
http://www.netis-systems.com/en/prod...dapter/95.html

Have the weekend to figure out what to do after I unzip/extract the driver.
Running Debian I should be able to use 'apt' to install the driver-
 
  


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