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Old 07-26-2011, 08:38 PM   #1
theKbStockpiler
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Can't Change CPU fan speed form High.


I have a Abit Lg95Z board that has pwm and a four wire fan and I can't get the speed to change. Any ideas? Fan is inserted into CPU plug as well and not the sytem one.

Thanks in advance!

Last edited by theKbStockpiler; 07-26-2011 at 08:40 PM.
 
Old 07-26-2011, 09:38 PM   #2
theKbStockpiler
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partially solved: Smart fan works now.

I set the (CPU Slope Select PWM/C way down to 4 I think and set (CPU Start PWM Value) to 50. CPU temp is hovering at about 48 Celsius. I can't even imagine what the first setting is for. I'm assuming it is dynamic. It might change the PWM as the CPU temp changes but I'm pulling this out of thin air. There really should be the (delta T) symbol in the expression if this guess is correct.Any enlightening will be appreciated! The (CPU Start Value) is most likely initial fan speed at immediate start up. What good would this do?

Last edited by theKbStockpiler; 07-26-2011 at 10:03 PM.
 
Old 07-27-2011, 06:43 PM   #3
teckk
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You might want to scale the CPU. This is for Arch but you'll get the idea.
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php...quency_Scaling
 
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Old 07-27-2011, 06:58 PM   #4
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Most mainboards nowadays have an automatic control for the CPU fan, so that you don't have to put in values manually. There should either be an option for training the fan, so that the BIOS can learn when the fan stops and when it has reached its maximum speed, or there is an option to give a target-temperature for the CPU or you can choose between modes like "Slow", "Fast", "Automatic", "Silent" or something similar.
It may help when you post a photo of that particular page in your BIOS.
 
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Old 07-28-2011, 02:10 PM   #5
theKbStockpiler
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Picture of the case as well

I bought this case in a bare bonz kit and did not use it because of the low quality but did decide to use it as a test server. It has an air inlet in the side with duct that extends inside the case towards the CPU fan so it draws air in the case as well. Such a great idea I expect to see it on all cases but for some reason it is not. I just thought the hardware members would think it was interesting. It has an oversized stock style CPU cooler which has good looks and function, like everything should be.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg PICT0275.jpg (252.9 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg PICT0276.jpg (256.3 KB, 4 views)

Last edited by theKbStockpiler; 07-28-2011 at 02:46 PM.
 
Old 07-29-2011, 06:43 AM   #6
cascade9
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Hmm, I actually checke tehabit site, hoping that the motherboard manual would give me a bit more info. Seems that board was made after abit started to go 'bad' and the manual I saw was pretty much a joke.

I'm semi-guessing at exactly what some of the functions of that fan control are. You might have to play around to get the results you want.

Start PWM Value = The speed the fan is spinning when it starts (value 0-127)
Fan Start Temp = The temp at which the fan starts spinning.
Fan Limit Temp = The temp at which the fan is spining 100%.
Slope Select = A value that changes the 'ramp' from fan start to maximum. A higher value should ramp the speed up faster (I think! )

Quote:
Originally Posted by theKbStockpiler View Post
I bought this case in a bare bonz kit and did not use it because of the low quality but did decide to use it as a test server. It has an air inlet in the side with duct that extends inside the case towards the CPU fan so it draws air in the case as well. Such a great idea I expect to see it on all cases but for some reason it is not. I just thought the hardware members would think it was interesting.
I can see why you like the 'side mounted fan over the CPU area' idea, but its not for everyone.

I prefer to have airflow a different way through the case (IMO it works better, depending on your fan/airflow setup). Those side fans also make filtering the air going into the system a bit more fiddly.
 
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Old 07-29-2011, 07:00 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theKbStockpiler View Post
I bought this case in a bare bonz kit and did not use it because of the low quality but did decide to use it as a test server. It has an air inlet in the side with duct that extends inside the case towards the CPU fan so it draws air in the case as well. Such a great idea I expect to see it on all cases but for some reason it is not. I just thought the hardware members would think it was interesting.
Wouldn't work for me, I don't use a top-down heatsink, I use a tower heatsink.
 
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Old 07-29-2011, 09:28 AM   #8
catkin
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Is there a "Super I/O" chip on the board allowing temperature measurement and fan control? The lmsensors package would probe for one -- and could be set up to control fan speed if the hardware supports it.
 
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Old 07-29-2011, 02:17 PM   #9
theKbStockpiler
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I could complain about bad documentation all day.

The board has a high build quality and the manual is not all that informative. If the slope is set above four it basically runs at full speed from the start. The best info I could find on it was a search for PWM slope that was translated from Russian but I lost the link. I think your guess work on the settings is very logical but I don't think Abit used the right descriptions for the settings. I have Lm installed but have never looked into how to use it.



I like using CPU spring kits which can't be used with extravagant heat sinks because of clearance. The silly fan mounts on 775 board puts pressure on the CPU-pins. Not all of the boards are the same thickness so I think there are a lot of CPUs installed with the improper pressure on the Pins. Another CPU cooler design that I think introduces negatives is that on most of them the fins are separated from the base too much (copper pipe style) so the cooler can dissipate more heat but at a higher temperature. Plain copper pipe does not have a large area-contact to air so the longer the pipes the higher the temp before it is dissipated. I just think that if an overkill cooler set up is used it introduces risk with no pay off for the average desktop. What if you install a liquid cooler and it leaks for example? If your over clocking then defiantly go with the BlackWidow. I personally would like to build a static only style of cooler (no fan) but it of coarse would be impractical, interesting but would probably destroy the computer at some point. I also like having a large fan on the CPU side of the case so in case the CPU fan stops you still get some protection and this same fan brings room air into the case. I like the (do the most with the least approach) but whatever fills our needs is the best.

Last edited by theKbStockpiler; 07-29-2011 at 02:18 PM.
 
Old 08-01-2011, 07:35 AM   #10
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theKbStockpiler View Post
The board has a high build quality and the manual is not all that informative. If the slope is set above four it basically runs at full speed from the start. The best info I could find on it was a search for PWM slope that was translated from Russian but I lost the link. I think your guess work on the settings is very logical but I don't think Abit used the right descriptions for the settings. I have Lm installed but have never looked into how to use it.
Abits later manuals (and boards for that matter) aent up to the level the earlier maunals. Abit used to make just about the best manuals around.

The settings could be in binary (0-127) or they could be in decimal, etc.. Like I said, you will probably need to do some playing with the settinsg to get the effect you want.

LM-sensors, I had to actually think to get that one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by theKbStockpiler View Post
I like using CPU spring kits which can't be used with extravagant heat sinks because of clearance. The silly fan mounts on 775 board puts pressure on the CPU-pins. Not all of the boards are the same thickness so I think there are a lot of CPUs installed with the improper pressure on the Pins. Another CPU cooler design that I think introduces negatives is that on most of them the fins are separated from the base too much (copper pipe style) so the cooler can dissipate more heat but at a higher temperature. Plain copper pipe does not have a large area-contact to air so the longer the pipes the higher the temp before it is dissipated. I just think that if an overkill cooler set up is used it introduces risk with no pay off for the average desktop. What if you install a liquid cooler and it leaks for example? If your over clocking then defiantly go with the BlackWidow. I personally would like to build a static only style of cooler (no fan) but it of coarse would be impractical, interesting but would probably destroy the computer at some point. I also like having a large fan on the CPU side of the case so in case the CPU fan stops you still get some protection and this same fan brings room air into the case. I like the (do the most with the least approach) but whatever fills our needs is the best.
Heatpipe (not 'copper pipe') cooling works really well. They can be a bit 'meh' at very low temps, due to the way that heatpipes work, but there is no real risk in using heatpipe coolers.

I actually ran water cooling for several years, never had a leak. I ran the watercolling fanless (in winter) and also had a aircooled fanless system.

Black Widow, which one? There has been several. Dynapower, coolermaster and thermaltake have all made 'black widow' cases, and thats just the ones I remember offhand....

Last edited by cascade9; 08-01-2011 at 07:37 AM.
 
  


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