LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General
User Name
Password
Linux - General This Linux forum is for general Linux questions and discussion.
If it is Linux Related and doesn't seem to fit in any other forum then this is the place.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 07-10-2019, 02:12 PM   #1
linustalman
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Location: Ireland
Distribution: Debian 9 Stable (Stretch) x64
Posts: 3,496

Rep: Reputation: 378Reputation: 378Reputation: 378Reputation: 378
Question What makes some tech savvy people decide to give GNU/Linux a try and others never even bother?


Hi.

I wonder why this is. Are us GNU/Linux folk simply more open-minded? More curious, etc?

What do ye think?

Thanks.
 
Old 07-10-2019, 02:32 PM   #2
jbuckley2004
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Distribution: Fedora (KDE spin)
Posts: 180

Rep: Reputation: 61
I would guess that "tech-savvy" people are slightly less afraid of messing things up when trying something that's a bit more cutting edge.
Perhaps the reason businesses have been reluctant to change to FOSS is because businesses have a lot to lose when things get messed up, even more than people.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-10-2019, 06:56 PM   #3
berndbausch
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2013
Location: Tokyo
Distribution: Redhat/Centos, Ubuntu, Raspbian, Fedora, Alpine, Cirros, OpenSuse/SLES
Posts: 3,099

Rep: Reputation: 811Reputation: 811Reputation: 811Reputation: 811Reputation: 811Reputation: 811Reputation: 811
Quote:
Originally Posted by linustalman View Post
Hi.

I wonder why this is. Are us GNU/Linux folk simply more open-minded? More curious, etc?

What do ye think?

Thanks.
While I use a lot of Linux, my main PC runs Windows 10. Why?
- it just works
- hard to do my job without MS Office, mostly because of the investment in existing Powerpoint presentations (no, they don’t display correctly in {Open,Libre}Office) and the Office requirement of my business partner
- hard to do my job without Camtasia

I think one can be open-minded without using Linux. There are only so many hours in a day, and you have to pick the things you want to deal with.

By the way, GNU/Linux is a misnomer. It should be Apache/MariaDB/Oracle/KDE/..../GNU/Linux. Linux as an abbreviation works for me. If you prefer, we can also call it Richardix.
 
Old 07-10-2019, 07:00 PM   #4
evo2
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Location: Japan
Distribution: Mostly Debian and CentOS
Posts: 5,895

Rep: Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365
Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by berndbausch View Post
By the way, GNU/Linux is a misnomer. It should be Apache/MariaDB/Oracle/KDE/..../GNU/Linux. Linux as an abbreviation works for me. If you prefer, we can also call it Richardix.
If you build an LFS system you may change your opinion on that.

Evo2.
 
Old 07-10-2019, 07:59 PM   #5
frankbell
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Ubuntu MATE, Mageia, and whatever VMs I happen to be playing with
Posts: 15,086
Blog Entries: 25

Rep: Reputation: 4263Reputation: 4263Reputation: 4263Reputation: 4263Reputation: 4263Reputation: 4263Reputation: 4263Reputation: 4263Reputation: 4263Reputation: 4263Reputation: 4263
Define "tech savvy."

I've known persons who were very adept at using complex, intricate applications (such as, just to pick a couple, Adobe nDesign and Active Directory) that are quite savvy about the tech that they use, but they have no notion of what's going on behind the scenes of the tech that they know. I think that persons who are attracted to Linux are not just tech savvy; they are also tech curious.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-11-2019, 01:37 AM   #6
berndbausch
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2013
Location: Tokyo
Distribution: Redhat/Centos, Ubuntu, Raspbian, Fedora, Alpine, Cirros, OpenSuse/SLES
Posts: 3,099

Rep: Reputation: 811Reputation: 811Reputation: 811Reputation: 811Reputation: 811Reputation: 811Reputation: 811
Quote:
Originally Posted by evo2 View Post
Hi,

If you build an LFS system you may change your opinion on that.

Evo2.
Quite possibly, yes. However, I don't use LFS (shouldn't you call it GNU/LFS?), but Apache/MariaDB/Oracle/KDE/..../GNU/Richardix.
 
Old 07-11-2019, 02:17 AM   #7
pan64
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Mar 2012
Location: Hungary
Distribution: debian/ubuntu/suse ...
Posts: 12,830

Rep: Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033
I was actually forced to try/use a lot of them (including different linux and unix distros).
 
Old 07-11-2019, 03:44 AM   #8
evo2
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Location: Japan
Distribution: Mostly Debian and CentOS
Posts: 5,895

Rep: Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365Reputation: 1365
Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by berndbausch View Post
Quite possibly, yes.
I was genuinely surprised to find that other than the Linux kernel, pretty much everything at the core is GNU.

Quote:
However, I don't use LFS (shouldn't you call it GNU/LFS?)
LFS is the name of the project, not a description of the OS.

Quote:
, but Apache/MariaDB/Oracle/KDE/..../GNU/Richardix.
You're naming applications. There is a difference.

Evo2.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-11-2019, 06:40 AM   #9
hazel
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2016
Location: Harrow, UK
Distribution: LFS, AntiX, Slackware
Posts: 3,061
Blog Entries: 8

Rep: Reputation: 1619Reputation: 1619Reputation: 1619Reputation: 1619Reputation: 1619Reputation: 1619Reputation: 1619Reputation: 1619Reputation: 1619Reputation: 1619Reputation: 1619
I would describe myself more as technophobic than tech-savvy! I get paranoid having to use tech that I don't understand. With Windows you never know what the damn' machine is doing or why it's doing it. Linux is well documented and doesn't do things behind your back (or at least the distros I have preferred to use don't do that).
 
Old 07-11-2019, 07:11 AM   #10
pan64
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Mar 2012
Location: Hungary
Distribution: debian/ubuntu/suse ...
Posts: 12,830

Rep: Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033Reputation: 4033
Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
I would describe myself more as technophobic than tech-savvy! I get paranoid having to use tech that I don't understand. With Windows you never know what the damn' machine is doing or why it's doing it. Linux is well documented and doesn't do things behind your back (or at least the distros I have preferred to use don't do that).
That is not that simple. The software are planned/designed/written/implemented by people. So they contain errors.
In windows probably harder to identify and fix them, but they "available" on linux too. Most of the programmers make errors. And new software (which were only developed in the last few months/years) are [almost] always buggy on linux too.
 
Old 07-11-2019, 07:26 AM   #11
BW-userx
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Sep 2013
Location: Somewhere in my head.
Distribution: Slackware 14.2 current / ArcoLinux / Void Linux
Posts: 8,881

Rep: Reputation: 1854Reputation: 1854Reputation: 1854Reputation: 1854Reputation: 1854Reputation: 1854Reputation: 1854Reputation: 1854Reputation: 1854Reputation: 1854Reputation: 1854
that is a question that only the persons you're asking about can answer, otherwise it is purely speculation, and if you enjoy living your life on speculation.

Why would you do that?
 
Old 07-11-2019, 07:34 AM   #12
berndbausch
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2013
Location: Tokyo
Distribution: Redhat/Centos, Ubuntu, Raspbian, Fedora, Alpine, Cirros, OpenSuse/SLES
Posts: 3,099

Rep: Reputation: 811Reputation: 811Reputation: 811Reputation: 811Reputation: 811Reputation: 811Reputation: 811
Quote:
Originally Posted by evo2 View Post
You're naming applications. There is a difference.
I hope you see that I am not entirely serious. On the other hand, the border between system utilities and applications is not really that well defined.
 
Old 07-11-2019, 08:16 AM   #13
teckk
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Distribution: FreeBSD Arch
Posts: 2,167

Rep: Reputation: 437Reputation: 437Reputation: 437Reputation: 437Reputation: 437
Quote:
With Windows you never know what the damn' machine is doing or why it's doing it.
No, you sure don't. I like to have a little input in what my machine does.
Quote:
Linux is well documented and doesn't do things behind your back
It sure is, and unless you have software that is made to report things, it doesn't report anything.

Some of the reasons for looking at tech other than windows is philosophy. Different view of what makes freedom.

The same thing that makes some people say "If you aren't doing anything wrong then you should not care who listens/knows."

While others might say "Are you kidding? I don't want you listening to anything of mine."

Linux users might just be a more self reliant people. They want to do "it" themselves. Not have something do "it" for them. That makes you free-er. You can't take "it" away from me because I have the knowledge about "it" in my brain now. I'll do "it" the way I want to do it. And maybe get a little joy and a cense of accomplishment from learning things.

Then some of it would be laziness or lack of time. They were introduced to windows in kindergarten, that's what they have been use to for 10 years, are barely able to click an icon and get a application to open. They are not about to try and learn something new.

Any of you ever have to provide tech support for your average office worker? Sorry for being rude but...gosh. And that's with windows that does almost everything for you. Imagine, having to do Slackware tech support for an average office full of data entry people....I would sooner take up pig farming for a living.

We have a fair size group of people in the US that have a philosophy of "I'm stupid and I am proud of it". Just do it for me. Windows takes care of some of that. You may have to actually edit a config file to use Linux. (The horror)

That is something that microsoft did, they brought it down to the lowest common denominator so that even granny can email. Although windows 10, whenever I have to use it, still looks like a mess to me.
 
Old 07-11-2019, 08:31 AM   #14
MensaWater
LQ Guru
 
Registered: May 2005
Location: Atlanta Georgia USA
Distribution: Redhat (RHEL), CentOS, Fedora, CoreOS, Debian, FreeBSD, HP-UX, Solaris, SCO
Posts: 7,785
Blog Entries: 15

Rep: Reputation: 1640Reputation: 1640Reputation: 1640Reputation: 1640Reputation: 1640Reputation: 1640Reputation: 1640Reputation: 1640Reputation: 1640Reputation: 1640Reputation: 1640
For me its a matter of what I "need" to learn. Back when DOS and Lotus 123 were big and I was a bean counter I learned both because they helped me do my work. As time went by I began working as a "power user" on a Unix system because it was what that job had. I learned things like Paradox because by then I was a "PC expert" in a company that had none. That moved me into being designated as the installer of Novell Netware and the network it used.

I used various other systems in other jobs such as Xenix in the Caribbean and in fact was hired for that bean counter job specifically because of my systems knowledge.

Once I left that and went into IT full time I learned the AT&T UNIX to the extent I became that company's system admin (as well as Sr Tech for all the client sites' escalations). There we moved to NCR UNIX then SCO (I know...) and a smattering of others. I first used HP-UX and Solaris there and variants most people never heard of (NEC Astrix, not to be confused with the FOSS PBX). I also learned the programming language to the point I was able to write data definitions for files which the developers hadn't bothered. Also I learned a new ticketing software along with emacs (bleh!) as well as Informix which it lived on.

After that I went to a job that used HP-UX and Sybase and also Anderson's Case tool, Foundation, which I became the administrator of (including it's Informix DB on HP-UX and its developer workstations on OS/2 requiring me to learn that). Later we migrated from HP-UX/Sybase to Solaris/Oracle so I learned that. I was first introduced to Linux as a workstation then.

In later jobs apps started moving to Linux so that by the time I got here 15 years ago we were mostly UNIX but had a few Linux systems. Over the last 15 years we've moved everything from UNIX to Linux so I've learned all about that.

Along the way I've also had to learn and administer related things like big SANS including the disk arrays and switches, backup software like NetBackup, BIND DNS administration etc...

I often tell people the great thing about my work is I've had essentially the same job function (System Administrator) since 1991 but the job requirements force me to learn something new every day. Accounting requires intelligence to understand but it bored me because much of it is routine. IT on the other hand has some routine but a lot of change that keeps it from getting boring.

Last edited by MensaWater; 07-15-2019 at 09:14 AM.
 
Old 07-11-2019, 08:53 AM   #15
fatmac
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2011
Location: Upper Hale, Surrey/Hants Border, UK
Posts: 3,036

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
By the way, GNU/Linux is a misnomer.
You're right, it should be FOSS/GNU/Linux. back in the days when it was only a basic terminal system, GNU/Linux was correct.

I'm a bit 'tech savvy' since I started using Linux & BSD, but I came to it because it was free, to obtain & use, MS wanted to charge me for everything!

In the spirit of 'RS', I give back to the community were I can, hence my presence on forums, as I'm not a programmer.
 
  


Reply

Tags
discussion, linux adoption, linux uptake


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Open Source needs more tech-savvy lawyers, Linux Foundation says jeremy Linux - News 0 10-23-2013 03:29 PM
LXer: Open source needs more tech-savvy lawyers, Linux Foundation says LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 10-23-2013 02:00 PM
Should Debian even bother doing "stables"? wartstew Debian 8 04-24-2005 09:54 AM
Code Red--Should I Even Bother? green_dragon37 General 12 06-29-2003 05:15 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:05 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration