LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General
User Name
Password
Linux - General This Linux forum is for general Linux questions and discussion.
If it is Linux Related and doesn't seem to fit in any other forum then this is the place.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 12-27-2005, 07:34 AM   #1
live_dont_exist
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Location: India
Distribution: Redhat 9.0,FC3,FC5,FC10
Posts: 257

Rep: Reputation: 30
Unformatted space?


Hey Guyz,

Was just wondering..is there any way to see how much unformatted space I have while booted into Linux?I mean :-

fdisk -l is going to give me a list of partitions that I have and I can figure out how much space they take but it doesnt show me how much space I have left on my disk if I want to install another OS.

df -kh will give me free space left on my existing partitions.I just want to know how to do this while in Linux. I know I can just pop a CD in to the drive and find out the necessary using the Linux installer but is there any other way?

Any pointers r appreciated...
Thnx
Arvind
 
Old 12-27-2005, 08:42 AM   #2
PTrenholme
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Location: Olympia, WA, USA
Distribution: Fedora, (K)Ubuntu
Posts: 4,186

Rep: Reputation: 346Reputation: 346Reputation: 346Reputation: 346
Look at qtparted.

Caution: If any of your disks are NTFS formatted, be aware that NTFS uses (and requires) "unpartitioned" space as a sort of "swap" space. This usually shows up as a 1 to 2 mB "free" area at the end of any disk containing a NTFS partition.

Edit: Not quite right. See comment below.

Last edited by PTrenholme; 12-28-2005 at 10:12 AM.
 
Old 12-27-2005, 09:47 AM   #3
xgreen
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Slackware,Ubuntu
Posts: 389

Rep: Reputation: 30
as root

cfdisk /dev/hdx
 
Old 12-27-2005, 11:11 AM   #4
michaelk
Moderator
 
Registered: Aug 2002
Posts: 16,820

Rep: Reputation: 2072Reputation: 2072Reputation: 2072Reputation: 2072Reputation: 2072Reputation: 2072Reputation: 2072Reputation: 2072Reputation: 2072Reputation: 2072Reputation: 2072
Windows uses a file for swap called pagefile.sys (NT and later).

The info from fdisk will display the size of the drive in addition to the size of the partitions.
fdisk -l (that is a small L)
 
Old 12-27-2005, 02:56 PM   #5
PTrenholme
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Location: Olympia, WA, USA
Distribution: Fedora, (K)Ubuntu
Posts: 4,186

Rep: Reputation: 346Reputation: 346Reputation: 346Reputation: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelk
Windows uses a file for swap called pagefile.sys (NT and later).

The info from fdisk will display the size of the drive in addition to the size of the partitions.
fdisk -l (that is a small L)
This is, of course, quite true.

And I was incorrect to refer to it as a "swap area."

But, as I said, the NTFS requires a small, hidden, area at the end of any NTFS formatted partition, and any attempt to use that space can, potentially, cause unrecoverable problems with NTFS. I believe that repartitioning tools usually deal with this NTFS strangeness.

From http://www.linux-ntfs.org/
Quote:
4.2. Notes
4.2.1. Other information

Everything is a file in NTFS. The index to these files is the Master File Table (MFT). The MFT lists the Boot Sector file ($Boot), located at the beginning of the disk. $Boot also lists where to find the MFT. The MFT also lists itself.

Located in the centre of the disk, we find some more Metadata files. The interesting ones are: $MFTMirr and $LogFile. The MFT Mirror is an exact copy of the first 4 records of the MFT. If the MFT is damaged, then the volume could be recovered by finding the mirror. The LogFile is a journal of all the events waiting to be written to disk. If the machine crashes, then the LogFile is used to return the disk to a sensible state.

Hidden at the end of the volume, is a copy of the boot sector (cluster 0). The only Metadata file that makes reference to it is $Bitmap, and that only says that the cluster is in use.
(Emphasis added.)

Just a "heads up" for those using the Windows XP or 2000 (or NT) operating systems and looking at disk partitions. Especially "dual booters."
 
Old 12-28-2005, 12:14 AM   #6
live_dont_exist
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Location: India
Distribution: Redhat 9.0,FC3,FC5,FC10
Posts: 257

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
Thnx guys ..appreciate the assistance given..that serves the purpose beautifully...and just for anyone else reading this thread...qtparted is a GUI utility based on a CLI utility called 'parted' so if you wanna stay CLI you can use parted...

Cheers
Arvind
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
grub won't load fedora 4, rescue disk says partition is unformatted! bean.art Linux - Software 29 12-01-2005 06:33 AM
K3B won't recognise a unformatted dvd+rw when inserted into drive. jackstoage Linux - Software 1 01-29-2005 04:13 PM
viewing an unformatted hard drive nitaish Linux - General 8 10-16-2004 11:40 PM
Holy christmas batman! where'd my unformatted hd space go? newjuan Linux - Newbie 9 05-05-2004 10:43 AM
Fortran unformatted file conversion from Solaris to linux SenorPedo Programming 2 02-29-2004 11:13 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:59 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration