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Old 05-01-2006, 07:34 AM   #1
michapma
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Registered: Oct 2003
Location: Zürich
Distribution: Debian
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shutting down after init=/bin/bash


Hi all,

Today I decided to upgrade my Testing version of Debian, which I haven't used in a while. I haven't figured out how to give sudo rights for APT to non-root members yet (irrelevant), and I forgot the root password. It's written down somewhere I don't have easy access to today, so I decided to try something I'd never done before and change it. I followed Google here:
http://aplawrence.com/Linux/lostlinuxpassword.html

I used init=/bin/bash with GRUB and mounted / and also /usr (to get passwd). When I wanted to shut down I also found I needed to mount /var. No problem, but I finally got an error message I couldn't get past:
Code:
# shutdown -h now
shutdown: timeout opening/writing control channel /dev/initctl
init: timeout opening/writing control channel /dev/initctl
I got the same error whether I used "init 0" or "init 6".

I also tried mounting more partitions, but nothing worked. I consulted a printed Linux manual and looked at my /etc/inittab, which was fairly opaque, and finally just used CtlAltDel, which worked.

After searching for a bit on Google the discussions I find on initctl are not very clear to me. I understand that init starts all other processes and I understand from the linked article that by specifying init=/bin/bash to the kernel argument it "dumps me to a bash prompt much earlier than single user mode." I'm not sure, however, what the /dev/initctl is about.

According to this LQ post, I need to init(ialize) init, but that still doesn't tell me what initctl is. Does anyone have a reasonably dumbed-down article for me to read, or care to quickly explain it?

Thanks,
Mike
 
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Old 05-01-2006, 10:18 AM   #2
bulliver
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Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Edmonton AB, Canada
Distribution: Gentoo x86_64; Gentoo PPC; FreeBSD; OS X 10.9.4
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This bit:
Quote:
init/telinit always assumes it is already running on root filesystem. /dev/initctl is a FIFO that init listens to. When you ask init/telinit to let's say switch runlevels for example, it is fed to init via this FIFO. So if init isnt already running using the *same* root filesystem, nobody is at the other end of the pipe to pickup this information. Hope that explains the timeout.
from this thread:
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...ad.php?t=39056

seems to be germain to your situation.
 
Old 05-02-2006, 04:15 AM   #3
ioerror
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By the way, when you do init=/bin/sh (or bash), it isn't strictly necessary to reboot afterwards (well, depending on what you change I suppose), you can just do an 'exec /sbin/init' to continue the boot process. Make sure the state of the system is as it would normally be though (e.g. umount /usr, make / readonly again etc).
 
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Old 12-21-2015, 05:13 AM   #4
bts145
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Registered: May 2012
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First you must activate the magic SysRq option:

echo 1 > /proc/sys/kernel/sysrq

When you are ready to reboot the machine simply run the following:

echo b > /proc/sysrq-trigger


http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/rebooting-magic-way
 
Old 12-21-2015, 08:56 AM   #5
Habitual
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Registered: Jan 2011
Location: Yawnstown, Ohio
Distribution: High Sierra
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bts145 View Post
First you must activate the magic SysRq option:

echo 1 > /proc/sys/kernel/sysrq

When you are ready to reboot the machine simply run the following:

echo b > /proc/sysrq-trigger


http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/rebooting-magic-way
09 year old necropost. ;(

Double-Secret Probation!
 
Old 10-28-2017, 07:16 PM   #6
jovanmal
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Registered: Oct 2017
Distribution: Fedora 26
Posts: 1

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Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ioerror View Post
By the way, when you do init=/bin/sh (or bash), it isn't strictly necessary to reboot afterwards (well, depending on what you change I suppose), you can just do an 'exec /sbin/init' to continue the boot process. Make sure the state of the system is as it would normally be though (e.g. umount /usr, make / readonly again etc).
I had exactly same problem and your tip worked for me

Thank you ioerror


Quote:
Originally Posted by Habitual View Post
09 year old necropost. ;(
This is still current command on most Linux distros. I dont see the problem with posting after so many years, if problematics is actual. I recently had the same problem

Cheers
 
1 members found this post helpful.
  


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