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-   -   Shell bypass to graphical environment (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-general-1/shell-bypass-to-graphical-environment-4475/)

Stephanie 07-19-2001 11:01 AM

Shell bypass to graphical environment
 
When my MDK 8.0 system boots up, it displays a command line first, then it switches to a graphical login. Now I like graphical logins, but how do I make it so that it does not display a command prom first, and just starts X immediately?

trickykid 07-19-2001 11:32 AM

It pretty much does that on all distro's I have seen. It flashes really quickly the command prompt like your gonna login from there, then it goes and then starts X. Its just the way I guess it starts up.

Stephanie 07-19-2001 11:48 AM

Do you know of a way around this?

Doom666 09-03-2004 11:11 AM

Oh, that's easy fixed... install Windows! Next you'll get a Mac and complain the Terminal is included.
But seriously, if you can't deal with the fact there are terminals and unix goings-on that your desktop runs on top of, why use unix?

trickykid 09-03-2004 12:06 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Doom666
Oh, that's easy fixed... install Windows! Next you'll get a Mac and complain the Terminal is included.
But seriously, if you can't deal with the fact there are terminals and unix goings-on that your desktop runs on top of, why use unix?

You do realize that this thread is almost 3 years old.
Secondly you should at least give an insightful answer instead of being a smartass about it. This is a legit question which just never got a full answer and I do know Stephanie realizes that her desktop runs on top of of a command line, etc.

One of the rules we like here.. post constructively or don't post at all. ;)

Doom666 09-05-2004 12:35 PM

Yes I realise it's an old post, but I was googling for something more useful. Then again I should've noticed the fact this is a site for questions as well their answers. I'm cranky what can I say.
Ok, in case it's ever useful...

init (the first process to be run once the kernel is loaded) is responsible for the startup of each of the vt's (virtual terminals).
It can be instructed to start fewer or even no vt's at all, by altering the file /etc/inittab. I personally don't recommend having no vt's however, because if X (the graphical environment) doesn't start, there's no way of logging in to fix the problem, other than telnet or ssh from another machine (and if that's also broken...?) But if you really want them all gone, don't let me stop you. :)

Anyway, here's an example, an excerpt from the /etc/inittab on my girlfriend's computer which only has one vt, as she has no use for them, and it's a rather old system (every little bit helps).
Each of these lines represents the allocation (startup) of a vt. They are usually listed in order of appearance, but a line ending with tty1 represents the first, tty2 the second and so on. Commenting out a line (putting a '#' before it) will disable that vt. This is preferable to deleting the line, so it can be easily restored if needed.

Code:

1:2345:respawn:/sbin/getty 38400 tty1
#2:23:respawn:/sbin/getty 38400 tty2
#3:23:respawn:/sbin/getty 38400 tty3
#4:23:respawn:/sbin/getty 38400 tty4
#5:23:respawn:/sbin/getty 38400 tty5
#6:23:respawn:/sbin/getty 38400 tty6


Doom666 09-05-2004 12:56 PM

I should also mention that changing the number of vt's doesn't alter the vt X appears on (it's also considered a vt), or the key combination for switching to it.
This is controlled by the script that starts X (note this is not startx). In Debian, this is the file /etc/X11/xinit/xserverrc. You want the vtN option.

For example, on my system that has four vt's, and X on the fifth (Ctrl-Alt-F5), my xserverrc looks like this:
Code:

#!/bin/sh
exec /usr/bin/X11/X vt5 -dpi 75 -nolisten tcp $*

PS, I'm a smartarse? Why thankyou, it's nice to be appreciated. ;)


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