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soda 11-29-2002 05:09 AM

Rebooting Linux quickly
 
Is there a way of rebooting Linux quickly without data loss and other complications?

qanopus 11-29-2002 05:27 AM

You are a real newbie ar'n't you. Don't matter, I was to (:)) . Just do "reboot" as root and you'l see you compu being reboot

Donald1000 11-29-2002 05:33 AM

For reboot try: shutdown -r "now"
For halt try: shutdown -h "now"

soda 11-29-2002 05:37 AM

Hi,

thanks but I wasn't asking for a simple reboot. I am not that new to Linux :-)
I was asking for a QUICK reboot (like reboot -f) but without data loss and other things that could cause problems for the linux system etc.

Thanks

qanopus 11-29-2002 06:13 AM

I don't understand what you mean.

stickman 11-29-2002 10:34 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by soda
I was asking for a QUICK reboot (like reboot -f) but without data loss and other things that could cause problems for the linux system etc.
It sounds almost as if your "regular" reboot comes with "data loss and other things that could cause problems". How exactly are you rebooting now?

trickykid 11-29-2002 10:54 AM

The quickest way to reboot that I know of is to do a ctrl-alt-delete !!

soda 11-29-2002 12:28 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by stickman
It sounds almost as if your "regular" reboot comes with "data loss and other things that could cause problems". How exactly are you rebooting now?
Just by typing "reboot". What I meant was there is the option 'shutdown -f' or 'reboot -f' which means fast reboot/shutdown. When I use regular reboot, it takes some time before the linux system actually reboots but when I use fast reboot by 'reboot -f' option it reboots immediately, but the next time booting into my linux system it will report errors, probably because important files were not saved before rebooting. Now: how could a safe reboot be used with the option -f ?

cmfarley19 11-29-2002 12:55 PM

Are the 30 seconds you save worth the hassle? Not to mention you add 3 extra keystrokes!!! That will comsume some of the 30 seconds you are saving!!!

soda 11-29-2002 03:47 PM

I was asking for a way to do this, not for your opinion whether you like it or not. This was an informational question.

cmfarley19 11-29-2002 04:03 PM

Lighten up, Buttercup.

trickykid 11-29-2002 04:08 PM

Alright, I wasn't going to say anything but keep it cool guys.

soda,

First off, this is a public forum and free to use. No matter if you like it or not, a question like yours and like many others, there is always going to be someone who might bring up their own opinion.

cmfarley19,

Don't call anyone names in anyway, shape or form. A post like yours is only going to be taken in the wrong way.

So I hope this thread stays on topic from this point on.

cmfarley19 11-29-2002 04:18 PM

Fair enough.

moses 11-29-2002 05:01 PM

The hard drives need to by synced and unmounted before reboot if you
don't want to worry about data loss. If you use a journaling filesystem
like ext3 or reiserfs, you don't have to worry as much about data loss
when you poweroff/reboot w/o syncing/umounting the disks. However,
to be safe, you need to kill all processes, sync, then umount the disks,
otherwise a process may write to disk after sync, possibly while you are
doing a poweroff/reboot. If that happens, there is possibility of data
corruption.
The real answer is that if you want to be able to shut down in a few
seconds, you are probably going to have to deal with the possibility of
data loss. Start using a journaling filesystem, and you'll reduce that
possibility, but you will probably never eliminate it.

Ciccio 11-29-2002 05:25 PM

Ok, I used to shutdown with the -f flag... but since my root partition's inodes got corrupted I stopped it...

However, if you accidentally overwrite some datablocks you can't recover them... but the superblock and inodes table have backups (by default) that can ve recoverd with fsck -b

If you do an unclean shutdown (without unmounting the drives) they'll be marked as not clear and when you start the next time fsck will run and scan them... that is the most important feature of the shutdown command (that it unmounts all the drives) And it kills all the processes.. so you are trading speed versus reliability.

As i see it, it is more important to keep our data safe than to save a few seconds each shutdown...

Save the penguin :Pengy:


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