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Old 04-25-2011, 05:22 PM   #16
NirvanaII
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
You will find connectors for PSU-fans mostly on mid-range and high-end boards. Most cheaper boards do not have them.
I've found my board here but have yet to work out whether it has the functionality:
http://reviews.cnet.com/motherboards...-32076438.html

So without this connection it is impossible to buy a PSU that doesn't run at a fixed speed, I guess. If that's the case here i'd better hope I can get quiter fans than the one I have, or that it is simply in need of a ceaning!

Last edited by NirvanaII; 04-25-2011 at 05:26 PM.
 
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Old 04-25-2011, 05:42 PM   #17
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If you don't go for the cheapest PSU it should have an temperature controlled fan. I would go for a brand like beQuiet, Antec or Thermaltake.
 
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Old 04-25-2011, 08:38 PM   #18
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I'll take a deeper look into those recommendations, TobiSGD: from what i've seen online already - and if I can find one to buy! - I could probably get away with getting a relatively old unit, and it still be 'silent' (just saw a YouTube review for a ThermalTake Xaser Silent that runs at 17dBA)

Thanks to everyone that replied here. (I read the link on cpufreq you posted, snowpine - seems i'd cpufreq and its modules/governers are installed already!)
 
Old 04-26-2011, 03:32 AM   #19
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I forgot to put this in last time-

If you system has always been this loud, its probably just the way it is. If its got louder over time, that could be due to the fan bearings getting old. More likely your system has got some dust/dirt in the case, and a bit of dust and dirt in the PSU, CPU heatsink or GPU heatsink can make temps rise. Becaseu higher temps can increase the fan speed, your system could possibly be cured of its noise with a bit of a clean.

Get some cotton buds (err, US lingo is "q-tips" I think), some alcohol (metho or isopropyl). Pop the side off the case, put the cotton bud in a bit of metho, then clean out the 'fins' in the CPU and GPU heatsinks.

For the PSU, you can go sticking the cotton bud into the fan from outside. It works, but it can take a while, and wont clean the dust and dirt off the heatsinks, etc., inside the PSU. A "can of air" blown into the PSU should get a lot of the dust and dirt out. Dont blow in from 'outside' the case, that will just blow the dust into teh case. Blow the PSU out from 'inside' the case, that wawy the dust gets blwon out of the case. Be warned, you can get a LOT of dust out of the PSU that way, try not to be standing behind the PSU exhaust when you do it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MTK358 View Post
That's true. Although many motherboards have a "PSU fan" plug on them, I've never seen a PSU that actually could use it (i.e. have a fan cord sticking out rather than having the fan internally hard-wired).
I've had a few PSUs that have a lead for a PSU fan plug. All the versions I've seen just have a single wire, for speed reporting, but I *think* there has been a few PSUs that actually take the fan power from the motherboard SU fan plug.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
You will see that mostly on expensive high-power PSUs, and even there it is rather rare.
Rarer these days than it used to be.

I've got a 'midrange' Antec PSU thats probably 6-8 years old with a PSU fan reporting lead, some newer (and much nicer) PSUs I've used and seen dont have that reporting lead.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NirvanaII View Post
Right, I did that: there was a 3 pin connector marked SYS FAN on the motherboard, but no plug coming from the PSU.

Could this connector feasibly be used for anything other than a PSU fan? I'd guess 'system fan', only I don't know if such a thing exists, or indeed that a PSU fan might be categorised as such.
You can hook up the PSU fan, or PSU fan speed reporting wire to the 'System fan' header.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NirvanaII View Post
So without this connection it is impossible to buy a PSU that doesn't run at a fixed speed, I guess. If that's the case here i'd better hope I can get quiter fans than the one I have, or that it is simply in need of a ceaning!
TobiSGD has pretty much answered this already, but just to spell it out- that PSU fan connector is virtually never used for actually controlling the speed of the PSU fan. If it is used, its normally just for speed reporting.

As long as you get a decent quality PSU it should control the fan speeds based on temps and/or load.

BTW, if you really want quiet 'seasonic' makes some great, quiet PSUs. Not cheap but very high quality. The really nice ones to get are the X-Gold series (X-650, X-750, X850) More power than you will need for that system, but they are very quiet...at low loads the PSU fan shuts down totally. You cant get much more quiet than that.

Also, some brands of PSU are 'rebranded' seasonic. The corsair HX-520 I'm using is one of them. Same quality, but sometimes cheaper than seasonic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NirvanaII View Post
I'll take a deeper look into those recommendations, TobiSGD: from what i've seen online already - and if I can find one to buy! - I could probably get away with getting a relatively old unit, and it still be 'silent' (just saw a YouTube review for a ThermalTake Xaser Silent that runs at 17dBA)
I'd be careful of older PSUs.

Older PSUs had much more power avaible on the 5v rail, more modern PSUs have smaller 5v rails and more power onthe 12v rails. They did that due to changing demands, older systems used the 5v rail much more than modern systems.

With your hardware it still should be alright to use a fair sized 'older' PSU, but I wouldnt. The CPU should be fine, Celeron E1400s dont draw that much power, but the video card could be an issue...7900s were pretty power hungry cards.
 
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Old 04-26-2011, 11:34 AM   #20
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Thanks for the lowdown, cascade9. Your suggestion of using a can of compressed air is one I might opt for before delving deep for a new PSU.
 
Old 04-27-2011, 01:42 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NirvanaII View Post
Thanks for the lowdown, cascade9. Your suggestion of using a can of compressed air is one I might opt for before delving deep for a new PSU.
No problems, gald it helped.

BTW, there is a chpeaer option than the can of air- a normal air compressor.

I've used one at places I've worked to blow out PSUs. Once or twice I've used the air compressor at a service station as well.

The only problem with using a compressor is that they can 'spit' water in the air. If the compressor has a decent water ttrap, that shouldnt happen, but lots of places never empty the water trap. So if you do take this option, blow the compressed air though some clean rag (white rag is the best for this). If you can see or feel water in the rag after blowing the air through, its probably got a full water trap.

You can still use a compressor if its blowing a bit of water, but its not worth the risk IMO. There is a chance that you will get corrosion problems, the water can combine with the dust to make some sort of evil mud that sticks everywhere. If you do get water in the PSU and dont let it dry before powering on you could blow the PSU or the whole system... ..

Last edited by cascade9; 04-27-2011 at 07:57 AM. Reason: typo
 
Old 04-27-2011, 07:34 AM   #22
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Canned "air" (it's not really air) can also spit out liquid occasionally, but I think that it's the "air" in liquid form that hasn't evaporated yet, not water. But I still heard that it can do damage.
 
Old 04-27-2011, 08:08 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MTK358 View Post
Canned "air" (it's not really air) can also spit out liquid occasionally, but I think that it's the "air" in liquid form that hasn't evaporated yet, not water. But I still heard that it can do damage.
Yep, your right, they can spit liquid, and the liquid is the same as the 'air' the cans blow out, normally a fluorocarbon, some versions might still be using hydrocarbons.

I've never heard of any damage myself, but I wouldnt be surprised if it happened. Its more likely to cause problems with heat expansion rather than electrical shorting.
 
Old 04-27-2011, 08:34 AM   #24
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I think is was in some magazine that I read that the liquid that can sometimes shoot out of "canned air" is so cold, that it can damage chips if it hits them. I don't know if that's true.
 
Old 04-27-2011, 08:53 AM   #25
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Yeah, its possible that it could happen.

It would probably be more likely to happen with chips that have no heatsink. A heatsink should give the chip some protection against thermal difference, because they are pretty good at speading heat (or cold in this case). A unheatsunk chip would have more difference in temprature over the area of the chip, and the heat difference can lead to chips cracking, etc..

Last edited by cascade9; 04-27-2011 at 08:56 AM.
 
Old 04-27-2011, 12:12 PM   #26
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You've both pre-empted my next discussion, cascade9 and 9MTK358, being that I checked a couple of shops today, and indeed, saw for myself that these 'air cans' - short of being held upright which would will be useless - shoot out some chemical; I chose not to take the risk.

My local computer guy had an Alpine Silent Power Supply (500w; less than 20 dAB), but i've yet to check how good these are, so am not buying for now.

Last edited by NirvanaII; 04-27-2011 at 12:51 PM.
 
Old 04-27-2011, 07:21 PM   #27
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For anyone reading this thread, here's an interesting article on factors to consider when purchasing a PSU:
http://whirlpool.net.au/wiki/psu_recommendations

And a rather handy calculator that works out a suitable PSU wattage based on the power your machine draws.
http://www.extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine
 
Old 04-28-2011, 01:54 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NirvanaII View Post
For anyone reading this thread, here's an interesting article on factors to consider when purchasing a PSU:
http://whirlpool.net.au/wiki/psu_recommendations
Heh, they have updated the whirlpool PSU list since I saw it last. Nice page, lots of good links and some decent info.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NirvanaII View Post
And a rather handy calculator that works out a suitable PSU wattage based on the power your machine draws.
http://www.extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine
Those PSU calculators are inaccurate at best. If you have no idea how much power the system will use, its not a bad tool, but they always give you a number that is higher than the real power consumption.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NirvanaII View Post
You've both pre-empted my next discussion, cascade9 and 9MTK358, being that I checked a couple of shops today, and indeed, saw for myself that these 'air cans' - short of being held upright which would will be useless - shoot out some chemical; I chose not to take the risk.
Its not a problem to move the comptuer aroudn so that you can spray into the PSU with the can in an upright position.

As long as the machine is switched off, there is very little chance that you will cause any problems, even if the some of the liquid does get into the PSU.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NirvanaII View Post
My local computer guy had an Alpine Silent Power Supply (500w; less than 20 dAB), but i've yet to check how good these are, so am not buying for now.
Looks like a "Yum Cha" generic, cheap power supply to me. I had a quick look around and didnt find any more info on the PSU though.
 
Old 04-29-2011, 01:50 PM   #29
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Yeah, I didn't find much on the Alpine PSU either.

What do you reckon to this?

http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php...=Story&reid=64

It carries 33A/396W in the 12v rail, and the fan doesn't kick till the load reaches 400w. It should fit in my machine, right? The connectors are standardized?

Thanks again!
 
Old 04-29-2011, 02:03 PM   #30
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It is a standard ATX-PSU, so it will fit into your machine.
This PSU should be fine for your system, regarding the power-output.
 
  


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