LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General
User Name
Password
Linux - General This Linux forum is for general Linux questions and discussion.
If it is Linux Related and doesn't seem to fit in any other forum then this is the place.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 12-15-2002, 07:20 PM   #1
SML
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2002
Location: US
Distribution: Intel Clear Linux
Posts: 381

Rep: Reputation: 30
Linux in a Microsoft-based company?


I am a linux user and currently studying at uni.

What happens when I return to the workforce and join a company using Microsoft products.

Will I be forced to use Microsoft again?

Would it feasible to tell the sysadmin that I will personally take responsibility of my IT issues? Would I be heading for a disaster?

Would there be any difficulties connecting up to MS servers?
 
Old 12-15-2002, 07:32 PM   #2
trickykid
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2001
Posts: 24,149

Rep: Reputation: 256Reputation: 256Reputation: 256
I think your type of question could only be answered by whatever company you end up working for and how they utilize their own IT infrastucture.

Well one solution, don't try to get a job where they use only M$ products and services. Most large companies usually in most cases have a mix of all different types of systems.
 
Old 12-16-2002, 01:45 AM   #3
gigsvoo
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Posts: 100

Rep: Reputation: 15
Talk to them nicely, as long as your Linux box can do the same work as other Windows machine does, I dun see any reason unless they are so stingy or they simply jelous????

I am using Linux for my daily work, connected to servers with Windows, Solaris, Windows shared printer and files, MS Exchange email server, as well as doing remote terminal service client. I responsible with my own Linux box, I not even reported any problem to helpdesk ever I started using Linux.

The ratio of Linux running compared to MS Windows is 1: ~1000 Windows 98/NT/2000/XP mixed.
 
Old 12-16-2002, 02:58 PM   #4
XavierP
Moderator
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Kent, England
Distribution: Debian Testing
Posts: 19,192
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 475Reputation: 475Reputation: 475Reputation: 475Reputation: 475
It all depends on the company you work for - if the company has forked over a fortune in Windows licences and employs people who support Windows then it is unlikely that they will let you have a Linux box. If the IT support is outsourced, then their contract probably states that the IT company 'owns' the hardware and software. In this scenario you would only be allowed to connect Windows box(es) to the network. Remember, every box that the contractor doesn't support means that they aren't being paid for it, or your hiring company will be paying a fee for a box which is unsupported. As well as all that, you could cause your company to breach the contract - and that would not make you popular!

Added to which, if you do manage to have a Linux box and your job requires specialised software, how will you persuade the hypothetical third party to install and update/maintain it - assuming the software is able to be ported to Linux.

I would say your best bet is to have your personal laptop visible with Linux running - try to do it by stealth. You may even persuade your hiring company to pilot it.
 
Old 12-16-2002, 04:47 PM   #5
deesto
Member
 
Registered: May 2002
Location: NY, USA
Distribution: FreeBSD, Fedora, RHEL, Ubuntu; OS X, Win; have used Slackware, Mandrake, SuSE, Xandros
Posts: 448

Rep: Reputation: 31
Unfortunately, if and when you join a large company, they will be telling you what OS/platform/SW you'll be using, not the other way around! In fact, workstations are stringently regulated in some companies, to the point where you can't install your own screensaver if you don't know your machine's administration info (or unless you kiss up to you IS/IT department to find out).
Linux is coming around, and some very big corporations are now using it, but it's still not the "norm" in the business world. As with any new situation, go into it with an open mind and see what the working environment has to offer. If it doesn't suit you, hope that they too are open-minded and will see your point of view. And if all else fails, like XavierP said, you can always pull in your Linux laptop and hijack the corporate network!
 
Old 12-16-2002, 08:03 PM   #6
gigsvoo
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Posts: 100

Rep: Reputation: 15
Yes, both XavierP and deestro has some point, now i am in that kind of company. But things just turned when all the upper bosses realized what Linux can do by better...

Asia is the best grooming region of Linux software market. M$ has its ass burned where both China and Japan already making Linux to be official implementation locally. The percentages are going down for MS domination across Asia, including Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia as well as the Phillipines, Thailand and India.

Only left those population that uses Windows are from non-IT sectors and some minor populations of unwareness or "lucky persons" (haven't had a chance to depressed by Windows).

I could say that in the coming 5 years, the balance of both rival software usage in Asia continent will be grately changed to a either balanced or Linux will overcome MS market in some like 60 - 40 portion.
 
Old 12-16-2002, 08:07 PM   #7
deesto
Member
 
Registered: May 2002
Location: NY, USA
Distribution: FreeBSD, Fedora, RHEL, Ubuntu; OS X, Win; have used Slackware, Mandrake, SuSE, Xandros
Posts: 448

Rep: Reputation: 31
That's deesto... I'm not a distro
BTW, I'm currently part of a 'mammoth' company that won't budge from Windows, so I understand your frustration. But that will change for me in a few months....
 
Old 12-16-2002, 08:19 PM   #8
gigsvoo
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Posts: 100

Rep: Reputation: 15
Frankly, frustration is not a point to me, I just got things running, and now I am using Linux to write to this forum in my office during office hours.
 
Old 12-17-2002, 12:28 AM   #9
SML
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2002
Location: US
Distribution: Intel Clear Linux
Posts: 381

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
Thanks guys ... some good aspects to consider.

From the experience of my past three employers (of a size with a total of about 1000-2000 employees), I think my plan would have worked if I used my own notebook in the office, although obviously the one huge problem would have been the Primavera project planning software that I used. Mr.Project would certainly not have the capability. The Primavera software is only MS supported.

I can certainly imagine the difficulties of convincing the sysadmin to let me format his desktop and install linux, but with my own notebook, the plan probably would have worked with those employers (particularly easily if I didn't even bother asking anyone.)

Guess I will find out later in the year when I re-enter the workforce and find my new employer who-ever that will be?
 
Old 12-17-2002, 12:31 AM   #10
gigsvoo
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Posts: 100

Rep: Reputation: 15
Yeah... i m too broke to own a laptop... if I had I would do the same thing too... using my own laptop will be the best. No argue.
 
Old 12-17-2002, 04:22 AM   #11
Nelleh
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Distribution: SuSe/Redhat
Posts: 94

Rep: Reputation: 15
At my old company you wouldnt have been allowed to plug non corporate kit into the network let alone choose your OS. We had NT with locked down profiles so you couldn't even change the cursors, we also had contractual uptime of 99.9% a quarter on the site (1000 odd position contact centre) so anything that might increase that was never going to get in.

If you are allowed to plug your own kit into the network then that tends to be easier. This is my laptop I use in the office and it is in a constant state of turmoil switching between windoze and linux, but then being one of the sysadmins doesnt hurt .

Asking to reformat the corporate workstation to linux would have got you on our hitlist at my old company.
 
Old 12-17-2002, 04:26 AM   #12
gigsvoo
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Posts: 100

Rep: Reputation: 15
Then be my guest that Windows is so fragile that need protection.

99.9% uptime does not means totally lockdown, to secure production boxes, there must be a development profiling like developers, migrators and production implementors.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My cable company doesn't support linux voltare Linux - Newbie 3 04-15-2004 11:26 AM
microsoft vs a pillow company .nyteshyft General 6 01-23-2004 05:34 AM
Tried to switch my company to Linux dj28 LinuxQuestions.org Member Success Stories 3 08-09-2003 02:49 PM
Linux Support/Help Company cokeonice General 9 06-17-2003 07:59 PM
I want a Linux Company in the UK to contact premmons Linux - General 3 06-20-2002 06:15 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:38 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration