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Old 07-27-2006, 03:01 AM   #1
alaios
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linux and double core cpus


Hi to everyone i was wondering if linux support multicore cpus... In my country many shops sell cpus with two cores..Do u know any compiler that can produce code for that kind of cpus?
Do u also know if windows support those feautures. I am not sure if the completely support of the cpu's feautures is an issue of compiler or the operating system. Thx a lot
 
Old 07-27-2006, 03:33 AM   #2
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Both linux and Windows support dual-core CPUs fine, a fact a very brief search would have revealed.
 
Old 07-27-2006, 04:01 AM   #3
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I want to explain me why they do support... Shouldnt the compiler produce assambly code for dual core cpus ?
 
Old 07-27-2006, 06:04 AM   #4
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Dual-core CPUs and motherboards with multiple CPUs are more often SMP (Symmetric Multiprocessing) systems and it's up to the operating system to provide support, not the compiler to generate assembly to support these.

Google is your friend and searching will provide you with a lot more information that I can. You should start with Wikipedia, it contains a wealth of information.
 
Old 07-27-2006, 10:30 AM   #5
Matir
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alaios
I want to explain me why they do support... Shouldnt the compiler produce assambly code for dual core cpus ?
No, as the instruction set is largely unchanged from their single core variants: therefore, the same code should be generated.
 
Old 07-28-2006, 05:46 PM   #6
alaios
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cs-cam
Dual-core CPUs and motherboards with multiple CPUs are more often SMP (Symmetric Multiprocessing) systems and it's up to the operating system to provide support, not the compiler to generate assembly to support these.

Google is your friend and searching will provide you with a lot more information that I can. You should start with Wikipedia, it contains a wealth of information.
Thx a lot so why windows do support dual core? Windows xp were written in a period that dual core was only a dream./. In which version linux started supporting dual core cpus?
 
Old 07-29-2006, 01:19 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alaios
Thx a lot so why windows do support dual core? Windows xp were written in a period that dual core was only a dream./. In which version linux started supporting dual core cpus?

Dual core might be relatively new, but SMP enabled oses is'nt. Its the responsiblity of the programmers however to take advantage of it, with multithreaded applications..
 
Old 07-29-2006, 05:14 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slantoflight
Dual core might be relatively new, but SMP enabled oses is'nt. Its the responsiblity of the programmers however to take advantage of it, with multithreaded applications..
But dual core isnt a kind of smp? In which version windows and linux started supporting that?
If u need special code to take advantage of smp why dont u use special code for dual core?
 
Old 07-29-2006, 08:19 AM   #9
Xena
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For quite some time now.

If you want to know exactly when, google is your friend.

But every version of linux I've used for the past few years has been dual-core friendly. Not sure about windows, but I think that has been too.
 
Old 07-29-2006, 11:20 AM   #10
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Quote:
In which version windows and linux started supporting that?
From memory:

The first of the x86 family to support multi-processor was the PentiumPro which came out around 1995, and I want to say a max of 4 could be used together.
(The last PentiumPro box I used was a 4way ppro200 Compaq Proliant around 1998 or so)

First x86 version of operating systems with SMP support (again from memory)
Linux 2.x 1996
WindowsNT4 1996
OS/2 Warp 3
 
Old 07-29-2006, 03:22 PM   #11
slantoflight
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alaios
But dual core isnt a kind of smp? In which version windows and linux started supporting that?
If u need special code to take advantage of smp why dont u use special code for dual core?
A program that takes of SMP is taking advantage of dual core. Not every program does, in fact, mostly only production programs, or some games take direct advantage of SMP. Otherwise it simply aids the multi-tasking ability of SMP enabled operating system, while the ordinary(non smp-enabled) program runs as if there was only one core, one processor. Perhaps some calls to the operating system are sped up, but generally non-multithreaded apps themselves don't benefit from multi-core cpus, but the user does benefit by being able to run more of these apps at the same time.
 
Old 08-23-2006, 05:26 PM   #12
alaios
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slantoflight
A program that takes of SMP is taking advantage of dual core. Not every program does, in fact, mostly only production programs, or some games take direct advantage of SMP. Otherwise it simply aids the multi-tasking ability of SMP enabled operating system, while the ordinary(non smp-enabled) program runs as if there was only one core, one processor. Perhaps some calls to the operating system are sped up, but generally non-multithreaded apps themselves don't benefit from multi-core cpus, but the user does benefit by being able to run more of these apps at the same time.
Thx a lot i do agree with u.. As far as i know must programmes dont take into account smp processors (cause its more difficult to code for them and more expensive) That means that not only os must support dual core but the executed programme too. Is that correct? Do u know if windows xp support dual core?
Recently in the market i have noticed many pcs and laptops with dual core inside. I am asking cause i think that people do buy them for the double performance benefit but unfortunately at this time are not supported from the most programmes in market..
Plz correct me if i am wrong
Thx a lot
 
Old 08-23-2006, 05:31 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alaios
Thx a lot i do agree with u.. As far as i know must programmes dont take into account smp processors (cause its more difficult to code for them and more expensive) That means that not only os must support dual core but the executed programme too. Is that correct? Do u know if windows xp support dual core?
Recently in the market i have noticed many pcs and laptops with dual core inside. I am asking cause i think that people do buy them for the double performance benefit but unfortunately at this time are not supported from the most programmes in market..
Plz correct me if i am wrong
Thx a lot
Windows XP and 2000 both support dual core cpus, as Linux has for a while.

Yes, programs must be ready to run on multiple cores, but you can still get a performance boost. Many people run more than one program at a time, and many programs that are heavily CPU-bound already have support for multi-threading or multi-processing (which is what is needed for the dual-core support).

You will never get 'double performance' from dual-core or dual-cpu systems as other problems have to be overcome that have some overhead (cache coherency, shared memory, disk resources, etc.).
 
Old 08-23-2006, 05:37 PM   #14
alaios
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matir
Windows XP and 2000 both support dual core cpus, as Linux has for a while.

Yes, programs must be ready to run on multiple cores, but you can still get a performance boost. Many people run more than one program at a time, and many programs that are heavily CPU-bound already have support for multi-threading or multi-processing (which is what is needed for the dual-core support).

You will never get 'double performance' from dual-core or dual-cpu systems as other problems have to be overcome that have some overhead (cache coherency, shared memory, disk resources, etc.).
Thx a lot but do u know such programmes to tell me? If the os supports dual core that means that can handle 2 different threads concurrently on the 2 different cpus? Do u know if today is worth bying a dual core cause not all the programmes are written for smp
 
Old 08-23-2006, 11:44 PM   #15
guzzi
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is dual core worth it

If you compile your own kernels and other big projects, with a single CPU, the compiling process uses most, if not all your CPU resources. However, with multiple CPU's, you can compile a kernnel, process a folding at home job and other things at the same time.

A multiple CPU system eliminates the need for multiple computers around your desk.

I find the big problem with multiple CPU systems is the noise of all the fans, and the heat. Otherwise, it's all good.
 
  


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